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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 29 Mar 2012 (Thursday) 13:25
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Best lens for product photography

 
chtgrubbs
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1,675 posts
Joined Jul 2003
     
Apr 01, 2012 16:50 |  #31

Either the Canon 60 or the Zeiss 50 Makro_planar would do a superb job for your needs. Personally I really like autofocus in the studio. Your eyes can get very tired trying to focus on small detail when you are doing lots of shots in a relatively long day of shooting. Don't overlook the 24-70 zoom either. Being able to zoom and change framing an composition without moving the camera can save a lot of time, especially if you shoot mounted on a tripod.




  
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dhanson
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105 posts
Joined Apr 2011
     
Apr 02, 2012 14:07 |  #32

If you aren't getting the kind of detail you can see in the first images, I would look at lighting / technique before looking at new lenses. The 50mm f1.8 in particular should be able to give you spectacular detail in a studio setting with the right lighting and post-processing. Even the 18-55 when stopped down should be able to give you acceptable detail for web work.

Are you shooting from a tripod? Are you trying to shoot with the lens wide open but with extremely high shutter speeds or something?

If I were you, I would spend some time practicing and experimenting. Set up your shot as if you had a model there, and shoot something that will really show differences in resolution. Maybe make up a board with a whole bunch of fabrics of different textures or something, and then shoot them, trying various combinations of aperture and shutter speed. Then examine them in dpp or photoshop to get a better feel for how your current lenses perform.

If you're not happy with the results, rent a really good lens for a day and run through the same steps.

Also, do you know how to sharpen and clean up your images in post-processing? Most catalog images have probably gone through some post processing, so if you're comparing what came straight out of your camera with images that someone has spent some time optimizing, you aren't really getting a fair comparison.


Canon 60D | EF-S 15-85 IS f3.5-5.6 USM | Tamron 17-50 f2.8 non-VC | EF 50mm f1.8 | EF-S 55-250mm f3.5-5.6 | 430 EXII

  
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CrushnCo
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24 posts
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Apr 02, 2012 18:03 |  #33

dhanson wrote in post #14197405 (external link)
If you aren't getting the kind of detail you can see in the first images, I would look at lighting / technique before looking at new lenses. The 50mm f1.8 in particular should be able to give you spectacular detail in a studio setting with the right lighting and post-processing. Even the 18-55 when stopped down should be able to give you acceptable detail for web work.

Are you shooting from a tripod? Are you trying to shoot with the lens wide open but with extremely high shutter speeds or something?

If I were you, I would spend some time practicing and experimenting. Set up your shot as if you had a model there, and shoot something that will really show differences in resolution. Maybe make up a board with a whole bunch of fabrics of different textures or something, and then shoot them, trying various combinations of aperture and shutter speed. Then examine them in dpp or photoshop to get a better feel for how your current lenses perform.

If you're not happy with the results, rent a really good lens for a day and run through the same steps.

Also, do you know how to sharpen and clean up your images in post-processing? Most catalog images have probably gone through some post processing, so if you're comparing what came straight out of your camera with images that someone has spent some time optimizing, you aren't really getting a fair comparison.

Hey im using a 3 flash setup with umbrellas at the moment, ive been considering getting strobes but i'd need to learn how to use them first. by sharpening and cleaning up the image do you mean just using lightroom and playing with the various tools? i use it a bit playing wiht the contrast and a few other things. and no im not shooting from a tripod with the 50mm cuz i need to get closer sometimes to take pictures of buttons and the little details in some garments.




  
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Ken ­ Nielsen
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Apr 03, 2012 00:03 |  #34

chtgrubbs wrote in post #14192121 (external link)
Either the Canon 60 or the Zeiss 50 Makro_planar would do a superb job for your needs. Personally I really like autofocus in the studio. Your eyes can get very tired trying to focus on small detail when you are doing lots of shots in a relatively long day of shooting. Don't overlook the 24-70 zoom either. Being able to zoom and change framing an composition without moving the camera can save a lot of time, especially if you shoot mounted on a tripod.

This is a good idea.




  
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Frugal
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Joined May 2009
Location: Northern CA
     
Apr 03, 2012 00:47 as a reply to  @ Ken Nielsen's post |  #35

The 24-70 2.8 is a great lens and has it's uses, but if you're buying a lens specifically for this type work you don't need it. In fact on a crop body, and stopped down to get some DOF the Canon 60 would give you a bit higher resolution at a fraction of the cost. It just depends on what else you'll want to use the lens for in the future.


Richard
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David ­ C
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98 posts
Joined Jan 2010
     
Apr 03, 2012 14:23 |  #36

IMHO, I believe your lighting approach/setup is what you need to improve before considering lenses. Your current lenses are capable of excellent work. But working with cloth, the amount of light and direction of all the lights you use (whether 1 or even 4) create the reflections that make the textures stand out. Subtle shadow effects from the surface of the cloth make or break the appearance and apparent quality of the product. Experiment with light placement, number of lights, and amount of light from each of the lights.

Consider using Live View while tethered to a computer while you move the lights about to see the effects on your image.




  
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CrushnCo
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Joined Aug 2011
     
Apr 03, 2012 16:16 |  #37

David C wrote in post #14203845 (external link)
IMHO, I believe your lighting approach/setup is what you need to improve before considering lenses. Your current lenses are capable of excellent work. But working with cloth, the amount of light and direction of all the lights you use (whether 1 or even 4) create the reflections that make the textures stand out. Subtle shadow effects from the surface of the cloth make or break the appearance and apparent quality of the product. Experiment with light placement, number of lights, and amount of light from each of the lights.

Consider using Live View while tethered to a computer while you move the lights about to see the effects on your image.

is flash capable of achieving the looks im looking for or should i consider strobes?




  
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David ­ C
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98 posts
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Apr 06, 2012 00:11 |  #38

CrushnCo wrote in post #14204472 (external link)
is flash capable of achieving the looks im looking for or should i consider strobes?

Either should do the task. It just takes practice and experimenting. All the lights can be varied in intensity and placement to get the best picture. Just keep in mind that these type of catalog pictures have slightly different requirements than when a model gets equal attention (if not more) than the garment!

Here the garment must be presented at it best. How the garment is draped over a table, or folded, is very important. Your image must make the sale for the product. When using models whose face, hair, and body actions help carry the illusion of the perfect garment, you probably do not need as much texture detail to stand out, but you then have the task of getting the best from the model.

Enjoy - just practice and take notes of what works.




  
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Best lens for product photography
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