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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 03 Apr 2012 (Tuesday) 00:43
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mike_d
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Apr 04, 2012 12:29 |  #16

Numenorean wrote in post #14208227 (external link)
But then the shadow would be more on the right, not the left. The shadow is from a light source slightly camera right.

I guess you could hold the camera backwards and get that but that would be awfully uncomfortable.

I've seen people hold it like that though. I think I've even seen threads about it.




  
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mike_d
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Apr 04, 2012 12:30 |  #17

digital paradise wrote in post #14208825 (external link)
Good call. There must have been a second light source like a lamp or something.

A lamp is unlikely to be that small and bright that close to the lens though.




  
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stsva
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Apr 04, 2012 14:35 |  #18

Numenorean wrote in post #14208227 (external link)
But then the shadow would be more on the right, not the left. The shadow is from a light source slightly camera right.

I guess you could hold the camera backwards and get that but that would be awfully uncomfortable.

That's the way I hold mine in portrait orientation - shutter button at the bottom, flash to the right of the camera. The difference is that I use my moveable flash head so that it still bounces the flash instead of firing straight ahead.


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Apr 04, 2012 22:10 as a reply to  @ post 14208924 |  #19

Numenorean wrote in post #14208227 (external link)
But then the shadow would be more on the right, not the left. The shadow is from a light source slightly camera right.

I guess you could hold the camera backwards and get that but that would be awfully uncomfortable.

I could imagine someone inexperienced or whatever actually turning the camera to portrait orientation but in the opposite direction than what we consider "standard", so that the flash is coming from camera right -- after all, your right hand can still hold the grip and the finger can stay on the shutter and you can still look through the viewfinder, it's not like turning the camera upside down, and I can imagine plenty of people don't know the "proper way" to hold the camera:)!


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Apr 05, 2012 07:54 |  #20

tonylong wrote in post #14211750 (external link)
I could imagine someone inexperienced or whatever actually turning the camera to portrait orientation but in the opposite direction than what we consider "standard", so that the flash is coming from camera right -- after all, your right hand can still hold the grip and the finger can stay on the shutter and you can still look through the viewfinder, it's not like turning the camera upside down, and I can imagine plenty of people don't know the "proper way" to hold the camera:)!

That's me - improper all the way! ;)


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Apr 05, 2012 11:58 |  #21

Numenorean wrote in post #14208227 (external link)
But then the shadow would be more on the right, not the left. The shadow is from a light source slightly camera right.

I guess you could hold the camera backwards and get that but that would be awfully uncomfortable.

Some folks like to rotate their cameras clockwise into Portrait orientation! :(


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Apr 05, 2012 12:03 |  #22

The side shadow to the left is caused by position of the flash, to the right of the camera. The side shadow could have been to the right, if the camera was rotated counter-clockwise to Portrait orientation (the more usual situation). Putting the flash on a bracket, which maintains flash position directly over the axis of the lens, would help with photos of people, because the shadow would fall behind the people where it cannot be seen by the lens; but in this situation of stair rail supports, it would not be the total solution.

A second flash would NOT fix the problem...it would merely add a second set of shadows!
Bouncing flash off the ceiling, which becomes a huge virtual source of light, would help to greatly reduce shadow definition (think of what happens on an overcast day...you don't see shadows!)


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shayneyasinski
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Apr 13, 2012 23:19 |  #23

After really looking I would say this is a crop censor specific problem, switch to FF and no more problems.


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Apr 13, 2012 23:26 |  #24

shayneyasinski wrote in post #14262696 (external link)
After really looking I would say this is a crop censor specific problem, switch to FF and no more problems.

huh?




  
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Apr 14, 2012 08:51 |  #25

Curious about that as well.


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Echo ­ Johnson
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Apr 14, 2012 09:03 |  #26

shayneyasinski wrote in post #14262696 (external link)
After really looking I would say this is a crop censor specific problem, switch to FF and no more problems.

???

Really struggling to see what you're getting at. The only thing I can think of is that no Canon fullframe cameras have a built-in flash, and thus either using an external flash or no flash at all, you'd be less likely to end up with the shadows shown in the OP. But if that's what you're thinking of, I think it's quite a stretch...


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Apr 14, 2012 09:19 |  #27

tonylong wrote in post #14211750 (external link)
I could imagine someone inexperienced or whatever actually turning the camera to portrait orientation but in the opposite direction than what we consider "standard", so that the flash is coming from camera right -- after all, your right hand can still hold the grip and the finger can stay on the shutter and you can still look through the viewfinder, it's not like turning the camera upside down, and I can imagine plenty of people don't know the "proper way" to hold the camera:)!

It isn't necessarily "wrong" to hold it that way with flash. I almost always shoot the conventional (shutter button high) way in portrait mode, but on a few occasions when I am shooting with a speedlight on camera, I may go the other way in order to position the flash at a more suitable angle. Depending on the angle to your subject, the flash can light them quite differently from being offset to your right instead of the left, particularly if you want to bounce it off the wall on that side.

Although I do avoid direct flash as a primary light source whenever possible, I do find it useful outside as a fill light and choose my "side" according to how I need to fill shadows or otherwise light the subject.

I agree, generally, with what you say but it sometimes pays to take the position of the flash into consideration. Oh, and my mates missus DOES use her camera upside down (admittedly it is only a compact not an SLR) because she is left handed and trying to use it normally finds she cannot squeeze the shutter button smoothly and tends to jerk the camera, so she uses it upside down and presses the release with her left thumb. Apparently it is what works best for her, but it does look damn peculiar. :lol:




  
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Numenorean
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Apr 14, 2012 09:27 |  #28

shayneyasinski wrote in post #14262696 (external link)
After really looking I would say this is a crop censor specific problem, switch to FF and no more problems.

After taking just a second looking at your post, I would say that you're completely and totally wrong.


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Apr 14, 2012 11:20 |  #29

tonylong wrote in post #14211750 (external link)
I could imagine someone inexperienced or whatever actually turning the camera to portrait orientation but in the opposite direction than what we consider "standard", so that the flash is coming from camera right -- after all, your right hand can still hold the grip and the finger can stay on the shutter and you can still look through the viewfinder, it's not like turning the camera upside down, and I can imagine plenty of people don't know the "proper way" to hold the camera:)!

Especially someone who uses a P&S where they have never had to use manual zoom or manual focus. When you are used to just holding the camera at arm's length to shoot, it doesn't really matter which way you rotate it for portraits.


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Apr 14, 2012 11:23 |  #30

shayneyasinski wrote in post #14262696 (external link)
After really looking I would say this is a crop censor specific problem, switch to FF and no more problems.

Numenorean wrote in post #14264261 (external link)
After taking just a second looking at your post, I would say that you're completely and totally wrong.

I'm sincerely hoping that he's trying to be funny (sarcastic)? :confused: He needs to learn what the emoticons are for. ;) :lol:


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