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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Astronomy & Celestial 
Thread started 25 Apr 2012 (Wednesday) 11:53
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Milky Way is back...

 
CSMFoto
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May 04, 2012 13:48 |  #16

You took a photo for 30 seconds and your stars didn't have trails?


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AxPhoto
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May 04, 2012 14:13 |  #17

Yep. It all depends on how wide of a lens you are using. I think with my 14mm lens on my full frame, I'm able to take a shot for 42.8 seconds without trailing. A good way to figure this that I've learned along the way is take 600/focal length of the lens you will be using and that is the longest you can shoot without stars trailing. If you are using a lens on a crop body however, don't forget to use the 1.6 conversion on the focal length.


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Todd ­ Lambert
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May 04, 2012 17:15 |  #18

It can also depend on which direction your pointing at in the sky. Towards Polaris will allow you to go longer than say shooting towards the equator.




  
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stickman513
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May 05, 2012 17:56 as a reply to  @ Todd Lambert's post |  #19

Great shot AxPhoto!!
I like everything about it...the clouds work great in this.

Best,

doug


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Mahgnillig
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May 06, 2012 15:05 |  #20

I've never taken a shot of the Milky Way but would very much like to. I have read a bunch of how-to guides so I think I know technically how to do it... but I have a stupid question. I look at the sky and see stars... but which ones are in the Milky Way? Is there a particular direction to face or a constellation to find to ensure that I'm actually photographing the right bit of the sky?




  
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May 06, 2012 23:41 |  #21

Awesome shot!


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AxPhoto
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May 07, 2012 00:50 |  #22

Mahgnillig wrote in post #14388738 (external link)
I've never taken a shot of the Milky Way but would very much like to. I have read a bunch of how-to guides so I think I know technically how to do it... but I have a stupid question. I look at the sky and see stars... but which ones are in the Milky Way? Is there a particular direction to face or a constellation to find to ensure that I'm actually photographing the right bit of the sky?

No worries, it can be difficult to see at times, especially with even the slightest bit of light pollution. The camera picks it up so much better than what our eyes do. Always look to the south (at least from mine and your location) to see the core of the milky way. It always rises in the South East and Rotates around the North Star and sets in the Southwest. I've come across a program I use all the time when planning night shoots called Stelarium. This program is outstanding in showing you exactly what time the Milky Way will rise and set as well as where it is located in the sky. This time of year, the Milky Way isn't really rising until 1Am-ish at this time of the year. It will rise earlier in the evening as we get later into the summer months.

Hope this helps.


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jrader
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May 12, 2012 07:28 |  #23

Mahgnillig wrote in post #14388738 (external link)
I've never taken a shot of the Milky Way but would very much like to. I have read a bunch of how-to guides so I think I know technically how to do it... but I have a stupid question. I look at the sky and see stars... but which ones are in the Milky Way? Is there a particular direction to face or a constellation to find to ensure that I'm actually photographing the right bit of the sky?

If you have a smart phone, just download Google Sky. If not, the center of the Milky Way lies in Sagittarius (it looks like a tea kettle or a 5-point star), which is right next to Scorpio, a much easier constellation to pick out. If you are really unsure, take a test shot at highest ISO and lowest f/# for about 30 seconds or so. You'll see the "cloud" if you are shooting in the right direction (assuming minimal light pollution). The best thing to do is to wait for new moon, when the sky is darkest. That's when it is easiest to see.

Hope this helps.

John



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May 12, 2012 18:58 |  #24

jrader wrote in post #14420127 (external link)
If you have a smart phone, just download Google Sky. If not, the center of the Milky Way lies in Sagittarius (it looks like a tea kettle or a 5-point star), which is right next to Scorpio, a much easier constellation to pick out. If you are really unsure, take a test shot at highest ISO and lowest f/# for about 30 seconds or so. You'll see the "cloud" if you are shooting in the right direction (assuming minimal light pollution). The best thing to do is to wait for new moon, when the sky is darkest. That's when it is easiest to see.

Hope this helps.

John

And, get away from city lights! Out "in the country" the Milky Way can be obvous, but in town the light pollution can make it tough to spot!


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Milky Way is back...
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