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Thread started 23 Jul 2009 (Thursday) 22:48
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The Film Thread (Red Ring not Required) A place for Analog Photography Nuts to Talk

 
TheBurningCrown
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May 08, 2012 15:05 |  #2971

Virto wrote in post #14398784 (external link)
I hear you on the creative funk issue. It's been hard to find time to shoot, let alone time to shoot something other than simple random snaps.

I'm there with you guys as well :(.

mikeCL wrote in post #14398801 (external link)
everyone keeps saying the foggy cloudy film is because it was not developed long enough?

Thin film (i.e. the *dark* areas on the film aren't that dark) is due to the film not being developed long enough. Foggy film (i.e. where the *clear* areas of the film aren't as light as they should be), on the other hand, is due to the film being exposed to too much radiation. This can happen in one fell dose (e.g. with an airport x-ray scanner) or over a long period of time (with naturally occurring radiation).

Old film fogs - that's probably what happened.

I shot a roll of reasonably old film (exp. maybe 2007 or so?) last week and still got some passable shots, but it's definitely fogged and overexposing by a full stop didn't help as much as I would-have liked.


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mikeCL
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May 08, 2012 15:18 as a reply to  @ TheBurningCrown's post |  #2972

Odd I don't see any expire dates on these films I have




  
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mikeCL
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May 08, 2012 15:27 as a reply to  @ TheBurningCrown's post |  #2973

hmm so my other films should pretty much come out the same way right? the others are maybe from '05-07 at least that's when I can remember using the film the most.




  
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DinosaurioAllie
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May 08, 2012 20:23 |  #2974

Tony-S wrote in post #14398739 (external link)
The magenta and yellow channels control contrast on multigrade papers. If that's what you're using (it's what I recommend) then you don't want white light. If you buy graded papers, then you can use white light.

It's a condenser. It makes it more difficult to control contrast, plus imperfections in the negatives, such as scratches and dust, will be amplified with it. I suggest you stick with the diffuser.

Hmm. 24mm. Don't think I've ever seen one of those. As a rule, here are the focal lengths of enlarging lenses for different formats:

50mm - 135 film
75mm - 6x4.5 cm
80mm - 6x6 cm
90mm - 6x7 cm
105mm - 6x9 cm
135mm - 4x5"

I've personally never used multigrade papers with colored light, only white light.

I assume that the projections are much easier to see in a darkroom. I've never used an enlarger with such soft projections as that with a diffuser. How does it make the contrast easier to control?

I've put in my 35mm negatives with the 24mm lens and it projects just fine. I don't have a 120 negative carrier so I'm not quite sure how those project.


Canon 7D | Canon 100mm f/2.8 | Canon 40mm f/2.8 | Mamiya RB67 | Mamiya Sekor 90mm f/3.8 | http://www.flickr.com/​mosbeckphotography (external link)
"There's a common misconception that all photographers want to photograph famous people, to be a paparazzi. To me that's like selling my soul. My photographs give thanks to people who have helped me out. Thats not selling my soul, that's gaining it." -Bob Campagna

  
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TheBurningCrown
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May 08, 2012 21:12 |  #2975

DinosaurioAllie wrote in post #14401731 (external link)
I've personally never used multigrade papers with colored light, only white light.

If you've ever used a multigrade paper with a filter, that's colored light. That's how multigrade papers work.

DinosaurioAllie wrote in post #14401731 (external link)
I assume that the projections are much easier to see in a darkroom. I've never used an enlarger with such soft projections as that with a diffuser. How does it make the contrast easier to control?

What do you mean by "diffuser"? I'm not sure I understand.

DinosaurioAllie wrote in post #14401731 (external link)
I've put in my 35mm negatives with the 24mm lens and it projects just fine. I don't have a 120 negative carrier so I'm not quite sure how those project.

If you see a comparison between the 24 and 50 - look at the distortion by the focal length. You might notice some softening near the edges if the projection lens isn't stopped down that much.


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DinosaurioAllie
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May 08, 2012 21:54 |  #2976

TheBurningCrown wrote in post #14401979 (external link)
If you've ever used a multigrade paper with a filter, that's colored light. That's how multigrade papers work.

What do you mean by "diffuser"? I'm not sure I understand.


If you see a comparison between the 24 and 50 - look at the distortion by the focal length. You might notice some softening near the edges if the projection lens isn't stopped down that much.

Ah, red filter. Completely forgot.

This is a diffuser: http://i541.photobucke​t.com …g361/47Frogs/ph​oto-65.jpg (external link)
I just Google searched it and that's basically the only image I've found.

I'll have to experiment with different settings.


Canon 7D | Canon 100mm f/2.8 | Canon 40mm f/2.8 | Mamiya RB67 | Mamiya Sekor 90mm f/3.8 | http://www.flickr.com/​mosbeckphotography (external link)
"There's a common misconception that all photographers want to photograph famous people, to be a paparazzi. To me that's like selling my soul. My photographs give thanks to people who have helped me out. Thats not selling my soul, that's gaining it." -Bob Campagna

  
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Tony-S
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May 08, 2012 22:52 |  #2977

DinosaurioAllie wrote in post #14401731 (external link)
I've personally never used multigrade papers with colored light, only white light.

Then your prints must be low-contrast. Multigrade papers are sensitive to two wavelengths of light, yellow and magenta. By dialing in those two colors on your color head, or by using a "polycontrast filter set" that has magenta and yellow filters, you control the contrast of the paper from 0 to 5. For instance, with my Beseler 67C dichroic color head, +70M, +15Y (cyan is always at 0 since the paper isn't sensitive to it) gives a contrast grade of about grade 3.5. +70Y, +10M gives a grade of about 1.

I assume that the projections are much easier to see in a darkroom. I've never used an enlarger with such soft projections as that with a diffuser. How does it make the contrast easier to control?

The diffuser along with your dichroic color head allows you to fine tune the contrast for different negatives. Most filter sets are in half-grade increments (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5, 4, 4.5, 5). The color head allows you to set many more increments and the diffuser reduces scratches and dust from the negative on the final print.


"Raw" is not an acronym, abbreviation, nor a proper noun; thus, it should not be in capital letters.

  
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DinosaurioAllie
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May 08, 2012 23:41 |  #2978

Tony-S wrote in post #14402501 (external link)
Then your prints must be low-contrast. Multigrade papers are sensitive to two wavelengths of light, yellow and magenta. By dialing in those two colors on your color head, or by using a "polycontrast filter set" that has magenta and yellow filters, you control the contrast of the paper from 0 to 5. For instance, with my Beseler 67C dichroic color head, +70M, +15Y (cyan is always at 0 since the paper isn't sensitive to it) gives a contrast grade of about grade 3.5. +70Y, +10M gives a grade of about 1.

The diffuser along with your dichroic color head allows you to fine tune the contrast for different negatives. Most filter sets are in half-grade increments (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5, 4, 4.5, 5). The color head allows you to set many more increments and the diffuser reduces scratches and dust from the negative on the final print.

How do you figure out the contrast grades of the different settings? Trial and error or is there a website that can help me out?


Canon 7D | Canon 100mm f/2.8 | Canon 40mm f/2.8 | Mamiya RB67 | Mamiya Sekor 90mm f/3.8 | http://www.flickr.com/​mosbeckphotography (external link)
"There's a common misconception that all photographers want to photograph famous people, to be a paparazzi. To me that's like selling my soul. My photographs give thanks to people who have helped me out. Thats not selling my soul, that's gaining it." -Bob Campagna

  
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TheBurningCrown
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May 09, 2012 01:33 |  #2979

Just developed and put up a whopping seven rolls of film to my Flickr account. Here's a link to my film set (clicky! (external link)) if you want to take a look. The new shots start about mid-way through the twelfth row.

Here are a few of my favorites:
#1

IMAGE: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8009/7163109030_c91d00bffd_z.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …/davidmadison/7​163109030/  (external link)

#2
IMAGE: http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7100/7163079892_ed24e89e25_z.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …/davidmadison/7​163079892/  (external link)

#3
IMAGE: http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7090/7163000606_5202a26c98_z.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …/davidmadison/7​163000606/  (external link)

#4
IMAGE: http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7078/7162976456_99de9edae7_z.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …/davidmadison/7​162976456/  (external link)

#5
IMAGE: http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7085/7162805050_4ff1d06caf_z.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …/davidmadison/7​162805050/  (external link)

#6
IMAGE: http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5234/7162767796_9dce32f210_z.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …/davidmadison/7​162767796/  (external link)

#7
IMAGE: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8021/7162840060_5a4798efc0_z.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …/davidmadison/7​162840060/  (external link)

#8
IMAGE: http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5234/7163038616_26ec85b956_z.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …/davidmadison/7​163038616/  (external link)

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mikeCL
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May 09, 2012 08:40 |  #2980

man love that last shot!




  
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Tony-S
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May 09, 2012 09:03 |  #2981

DinosaurioAllie wrote in post #14402722 (external link)
How do you figure out the contrast grades of the different settings? Trial and error or is there a website that can help me out?

They are printed on the package insert that comes with the box of paper. I use Ilford Multigrade IV and those settings are provided. Of course, that's only half the contrast story - the other half is how contrasty are the negatives. The best way to determine that is to use a densitometer, but they are really expensive. However, you can get an idea of how much contrast is in a negative by examining them on a light table, and with experience you learn where your starting point for the paper is. After that, you just fine tune until you get the contrast that you want.


"Raw" is not an acronym, abbreviation, nor a proper noun; thus, it should not be in capital letters.

  
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roosterslayer
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May 09, 2012 11:14 |  #2982

Dave- i love #4. nice work.


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TheBurningCrown
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May 09, 2012 14:44 |  #2983

mikeCL wrote in post #14404190 (external link)
man love that last shot!

roosterslayer wrote in post #14404851 (external link)
Dave- i love #4. nice work.

Thanks guys!


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agphotography
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May 10, 2012 15:04 |  #2984

Whats your guys' favorite old EOS SLR for manual focus? I think mine was the old old 630, it had a great uncluttered viewfinder that felt really large, kind of like the Olympus OM-1.

The 1N and 1V I used to work with also had great viewfinders and with the EC-B split-screen installed manual focus was a total breeze.

I may look for another 630 just to use my Zeiss 50mm on film, I want to see how it renders :D


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Tony-S
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May 10, 2012 15:39 |  #2985

I put a split-image/microprism focus screen in my EOS 3. Very nice to have. But the easiest focusing camera I have is my Bronica RF645. Its rangefinder is amazing.


"Raw" is not an acronym, abbreviation, nor a proper noun; thus, it should not be in capital letters.

  
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