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Thread started 08 May 2012 (Tuesday) 14:24
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how do you shoot your videos

 
pkilla
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May 08, 2012 14:24 |  #1

Just interested to hear what do you use when your shooting video with your dslr do you use a rig or go handheld a tripod any special gear you bring along with you for your film music video etc...


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ben_r_
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May 08, 2012 16:05 |  #2

If you want professional results handheld is pretty much impossible for any camera in any situation. You really need some sort of rig, shoulder rig, stabilizer, flyer, tripod, crane, slider etc. And yes, all of these are used with DSLRs. Do some searching around here and youll find many threads on the various types and situations were they might be used.


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gibsonla
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May 09, 2012 11:39 |  #3

If you have specific questions we can answer them.

Otherwise.... read this: http://nofilmschool.co​m/dslr/ (external link)


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Mr ­ Rogers
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May 09, 2012 16:13 |  #4

I'm not saying that this is what you're doing... but do not make the mistake of thinking that the image is most important to a film.

I write, rewrite, re-re-write, then re-re-re-write a script.

Then I use my camera(t2i), the few lenses that I have been able to purchase in my budget, and a simple tripod with a fluid head. For special moving shots I am forced to be creative and make devices to help me achieve my vision.

I collaborate with other people who have purchased lights, and audio equipment.
Then we move into pre production planning phase where locations are found and permission granted during specific time and dates. Some time during this process I search for actors.
Then as a team me and a DP friend work through a detailed shot list from the script. This shot list is first made in sequential order as it would be seen in the film so that we can predict how the placement of specific shots convey meaning to the scene. Then this shot list is reorganized into a more efficient shot list to avoid multiple setups of the same situation.

Then there are rehearsals with the actors so that they can memorize lines and become more comfortable with the character they're playing.

Then shooting happens. I try to keep this as organized as possible. I also try to realistically judge how much can be shot in a single day.

Oh and I probably re-write the script again a few more times in the middle of this whole process.

I usually log footage and label it by day,scene, and take.

Then when the shooting is done it's on to editing.

In my experience (which is certainly limited in the light of other people) I have found that pre-production is grossly undervalued by most amateur filmmakers. When you plan, unforeseen problems do not effect the final product nearly as much.

most of this i have learned through making short films or working on other films. By no means is it the best way or the most efficient way. But this process(which will change i'm sure) has worked for me.


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Sickone
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May 10, 2012 09:02 |  #5

At the moment all I have is tripod, so I do the best I can with that. I started doing handheld but only because I needed that look for what i'm working on.

IMO someone can do magic with just a tripod if enough imagination is used.




  
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joeblack2022
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May 10, 2012 12:17 |  #6

gibsonla wrote in post #14404977 (external link)
If you have specific questions we can answer them.

Otherwise.... read this: http://nofilmschool.co​m/dslr/ (external link)

Where have I heard this one before? :D


Joel

  
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pkilla
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May 10, 2012 13:00 |  #7

Good stuff guys keep it coming.. yea I'm looking for a tripod myself but most of my work is done handheld and is not impossible nothing is impossible!!!


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helios 40-2/helios 44-2/mir 1b 37mm 2.8/supertak 135/
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ChasWG
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May 10, 2012 13:38 |  #8

Mr Rogers, WOW! Nicely written out. And yes, that is how it's done in the pro video and film world and the way it should be done for many projects of that scale. I agree that many people (myself included, though often times I have a script in my head that I shoot to) totally miss out on the planning process completely. They just pick up their camera, maybe a mic and start shooting. And the end product is what it is. Sometimes those films work out, often times they do not. There can never be too much pre-production work done, but on the other hand, at some point you just need to start shooting and get something under your belt.

I personally use a tripod a lot and with it I have my rail system and follow focus. I also have a dolly/slider that gets used as well as my latest home brew creation, my own small jib. Yet another way to move the camera as opposed to using a zoom. I also have a shoulder rig that I built, it needs more work to be really functional for long periods of use, but I rarely use it. These DSLRs that shoot video are more akin to film cameras or the electronic equivalent RED Epic, Scarlet or the One than handy-cams or a lot of the smaller camcorders out there right now. The DSLRs need a lot of support gear to really make them sing. They can be made to be used as a shoulder rig, but there is a lot that goes into making that a fully functional set-up. Take a look at some of the rigs in a thread in this forum called, "Show me Your Rigs."

I recently did a few shots for a project that I've been working on where I didn't use anything other than my camera body, a few lenses and my rear view screen lupe to help stabilize the shot a bit and to see that focus was achieved. So it can be done, but don't go out and think that you will be able to hand hold every shot. It just never works out as well as you think it will. I did my shots hand held because that was a look I wanted.

I mentioned it above, but getting one of the rear view screen lupe is a must have. They make focusing so much easier. Some folks use a small monitor to help frame, focus and just so you don't always have to have your eye near the camera body. They are nice things to have, but maybe not the first thing you should buy. Get a lupe first.

I guess my point is really this, what you want to shoot dictates how the camera will be supported or moved to get that shot.

Good luck and enjoy your camera!


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ben_r_
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May 10, 2012 13:49 |  #9

ChasWG wrote in post #14411436 (external link)
Mr Rogers, WOW! Nicely written out. And yes, that is how it's done in the pro video and film world and the way it should be done for many projects of that scale. I agree that many people (myself included, though often times I have a script in my head that I shoot to) totally miss out on the planning process completely. They just pick up their camera, maybe a mic and start shooting. And the end product is what it is. Sometimes those films work out, often times they do not. There can never be too much pre-production work done, but on the other hand, at some point you just need to start shooting and get something under your belt.

I personally use a tripod a lot and with it I have my rail system and follow focus. I also have a dolly/slider that gets used as well as my latest home brew creation, my own small jib. Yet another way to move the camera as opposed to using a zoom. I also have a shoulder rig that I built, it needs more work to be really functional for long periods of use, but I rarely use it. These DSLRs that shoot video are more akin to film cameras or the electronic equivalent RED Epic, Scarlet or the One than handy-cams or a lot of the smaller camcorders out there right now. The DSLRs need a lot of support gear to really make them sing. They can be made to be used as a shoulder rig, but there is a lot that goes into making that a fully functional set-up. Take a look at some of the rigs in a thread in this forum called, "Show me Your Rigs."

I recently did a few shots for a project that I've been working on where I didn't use anything other than my camera body, a few lenses and my rear view screen lupe to help stabilize the shot a bit and to see that focus was achieved. So it can be done, but don't go out and think that you will be able to hand hold every shot. It just never works out as well as you think it will. I did my shots hand held because that was a look I wanted.

I mentioned it above, but getting one of the rear view screen lupe is a must have. They make focusing so much easier. Some folks use a small monitor to help frame, focus and just so you don't always have to have your eye near the camera body. They are nice things to have, but maybe not the first thing you should buy. Get a lupe first.

I guess my point is really this, what you want to shoot dictates how the camera will be supported or moved to get that shot.


Good luck and enjoy your camera!

Right there really is the key point. Think about all the movies youve seen. Watch more. Focus on how shots and scenes look and feel and pick them apart. Then, youll need whatever gets you the looks and feel you liked and want to go for for youre own scene. In then end if you stay in it and really take it to a more professional level youll find that youll need EVERYTHING! lol A slider, a steadicam, a tripod, a crane, a shoulder rig, a handheld rig, etc. as at some point youre probably going to want all those types of looks for something! At least thats the conclusion I came to and I went broke buying it all! ha ha good luck!


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Gameface
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May 11, 2012 21:44 |  #10
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IT all depends on what you are shooting. I've used a slider, a tripod, a porta-jib, a shoulder rig, steadicam and handheld. As was said, the situation completely depends. Not everything is good for every situation. I own a tripod, monopod and a shoulder rig and rent anything else I need for the job.




  
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Channel ­ One
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May 12, 2012 13:59 |  #11

ChasWG wrote in post #14411436 (external link)
These DSLRs that shoot video are more akin to film cameras or the electronic equivalent RED Epic, Scarlet or the One than handy-cams or a lot of the smaller camcorders out there right now.

Think of it this way, HDSLR equals movie camera which equals cinema, whereas a camcorder equals video which equals television, similar technologies as both capture images and save them as files but they do so with two different purposes in life.

And yes like a square plug pounded into a round hole each of them can be shoehorned into the others application but the results are usually less than stellar.

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Gameface
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May 12, 2012 17:42 |  #12
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Channel One wrote in post #14421412 (external link)
Think of it this way, HDSLR equals movie camera which equals cinema, whereas a camcorder equals video which equals television, similar technologies as both capture images and save them as files but they do so with two different purposes in life.

This is quite possibly the dumbest thing I have ever read on this site.




  
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Channel ­ One
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May 13, 2012 01:18 |  #13

Gameface wrote in post #14422027 (external link)
This is quite possibly the dumbest thing I have ever read on this site.

Is it really a dumb statement or could it be you simply fail to understand the basic differences between the two platforms?

Himmm.

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FlyingPhotog
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May 13, 2012 01:38 |  #14

Gameface wrote in post #14422027 (external link)
This is quite possibly the dumbest thing I have ever read on this site.

I don't think you're correctly picking up on the key point...

You don't just pick up a dSLR and expect to shoot quality video any more than you just grab an Arriflex to shoot home movies.

Proper "Digital Cinema" requires more in terms of lighting, audio and support equipment than does your average "Handy Cam."

A dSLR forms the core from which you build a solid production tool. Right from the box, a dSLR is very difficult to work with and makes a poor "grab & go" solution.


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Gameface
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May 13, 2012 15:59 |  #15
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FlyingPhotog wrote in post #14423589 (external link)
I don't think you're correctly picking up on the key point...

You don't just pick up a dSLR and expect to shoot quality video any more than you just grab an Arriflex to shoot home movies.

Proper "Digital Cinema" requires more in terms of lighting, audio and support equipment than does your average "Handy Cam."

A dSLR forms the core from which you build a solid production tool. Right from the box, a dSLR is very difficult to work with and makes a poor "grab & go" solution.

That is no where near what he said.

I work in the film and television industry. I think I understand all this. Saying a dslr = cinema = film and a video camera = television is just wrong. We were mixing "video camera" footage with our 16mm film to be displayed on movie screen long before dslr video came out. Saying that a video camera is only worthy of tv and not cinema production is patently false.




  
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