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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 13 May 2012 (Sunday) 02:06
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Watching other photographers....

 
madjack
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May 14, 2012 11:36 as a reply to  @ post 14429623 |  #16

Your argument has a lot of truth to it Wilt. Point well taken.


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whuband
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May 14, 2012 12:51 as a reply to  @ madjack's post |  #17

Since we have brought up baseball and burst shooting vs single shot, here are a couple of thoughts to ponder.
I rarely use burst on the pitcher or batter because if you are perpendicular to the path of the ball, a 90mph fastball moves 13 feet between each shot on a 10fps camera.
However, a play at one of the bases is different because it is slower and the fielder may drop the ball after the slide is complete. You will miss this if you shoot single shot. I personally always use burst on the bases.
Same in football, keep shooting the runner all the way to the ground. You never know what will happen.


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Channel ­ One
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May 14, 2012 18:41 |  #18

jra wrote in post #14423666 (external link)
Does anyone else enjoy watching other photographers?

Absolutely, and for a number of reasons most of which are for self education.

Wayne


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SOK
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May 14, 2012 19:32 as a reply to  @ Channel One's post |  #19

I enjoy watching other photographers...pros and amateurs alike. It's always interesting to see things they do differently/better/wor​se than you...

Much the same way I (as an amateur muso) enjoy watching/hearing other musicians.

And the same way I (as an amateur runner) enjoy watching other runners.


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golfecho
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May 15, 2012 07:25 as a reply to  @ SOK's post |  #20

A long running thread elsewhere in this section:

https://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=527090


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Bosscat
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May 15, 2012 13:53 as a reply to  @ golfecho's post |  #21

Last fall I was at my favourite local railroad photography spot, and its a scenic little marvel that is frequented by many photographers during the fall colour display. One fine morning I had already been there for about three hours, when suddenly a woman in her early 30's shows up, and starts shooting franticly, changing lenses, adding and removing filters, zooming, changing perspective and going through a huge amount of effort trying to overcome the fact that she was about 2 or more hours late from when the light was sweet.

I also used to laugh at the local dirt track when a few of the corner workers would ask why I was not down at the other end of the track like the 15 other togs on the infield clustered closely together and I replied "Monkeys and typewriters, monkeys and typewriters" as they all did the same basic shots.

I actually had heard through the grapevine that a number of them figured I sucked as a photographer, since I would fire a three shot burst, but when you are dealing with something that is bouncing and vibrating and you are using a low shutter speed, I'd rather have one of three be tack sharp, then zero of one.


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elrey2375
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May 16, 2012 03:06 |  #22

tonylong wrote in post #14427724 (external link)
Hey, that's a good, logical post, it's just that if you put it together with your first post it is a criticism of shooting in the burst mode.

Now, granted that if you have a lot of experience shooting a particular sport you get the knowhow of when you are likely to be able to snap the shutter and get a keeper. But even then, there are moments before and after that instant that may in fact yield something better that you could totally miss...

But also there is the fact that someone shooting baseball for the first time won't have the same experience that you have, no matter how good they are overall at photography. So judging them for using short bursts is, well, not very productive.

Also, at 61 I'm not as steady as maybe I once was, and so when I'm out shooting handheld, which is most of what I do, sure I fire off a short burst so that hopefully at least one of the two or three shots will be crisply sharp instead of blurry from camera shake. Now yes, a lot of times the first of the set will be just fine, because I do work at good technique, but there are times when I have to delete the first and settle on the second or third shot!

And, I've shot sports where the "moment" is just not that predictable, where something can change and you may not get it in a single shot, but in say a three-shot burst you can catch it!

This is why in sports. Even in portrait work, I will reel off a quick 3 or 4 shot burst. When you're working in thousandths of a second, there are minute differences from photograph to photograph and in sports it's the difference between THE shot and an OK or awkward shot. I do a lot of deleting in the field, so I don't get the huge number of pictures later. For baseball, between innings I always go back and look and delete the crap. Pretty much any time there's a lull in the action of whatever sport it is, I delete junk.


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elrey2375
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May 16, 2012 03:09 |  #23

whuband wrote in post #14430107 (external link)
Since we have brought up baseball and burst shooting vs single shot, here are a couple of thoughts to ponder.
I rarely use burst on the pitcher or batter because if you are perpendicular to the path of the ball, a 90mph fastball moves 13 feet between each shot on a 10fps camera.
However, a play at one of the bases is different because it is slower and the fielder may drop the ball after the slide is complete. You will miss this if you shoot single shot. I personally always use burst on the bases.
Same in football, keep shooting the runner all the way to the ground. You never know what will happen.

Yes, but I'm not shooting the ball, I'm shooting the pitcher and he's not moving quite that fast. And I'm also shooting well before he lets go of the ball.


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ShirleyWhite
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May 16, 2012 03:35 as a reply to  @ post 14429690 |  #24

I enjoy watching other photographs. You get an idea of how to shoot, and the different styles. There is something new to learn.


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cdifoto
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May 16, 2012 04:07 |  #25

I can't say I've ever really watched anyone that I didn't know and respect enough to want to mooch technique. Watching someone just to criticize their method seems a waste of time to me.


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Tessa
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May 16, 2012 05:56 as a reply to  @ cdifoto's post |  #26

Yes I watch other photographers shooting. No, not to criticize - how they shoot is their business. I watch them to learn: maybe they are using a lens/lighting I hadn't thought about using but seems better suited to the situation; maybe they have a much more interesting angle/viewpoint, etc.

I'm not trying to copy them, I'm just trying keep my mind open for new ideas. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't.




  
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elrey2375
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May 16, 2012 16:25 |  #27

cdifoto wrote in post #14439114 (external link)
I can't say I've ever really watched anyone that I didn't know and respect enough to want to mooch technique. Watching someone just to criticize their method seems a waste of time to me.

What about out of curiosity?


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cdifoto
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May 17, 2012 00:39 |  #28

elrey2375 wrote in post #14441988 (external link)
What about out of curiosity?

If I'm truly curious I'll strike up a conversation instead. Just watching doesn't accomplish anything. Most convos are to kill time though, not glean tips. And I seldom work where other photogs work.


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tonylong
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May 17, 2012 00:49 |  #29

I've watched other photographers on occasion -- they pointed the camera and either went "click" or maybe "click-click-click" -- almost as exciting as watching golf or Nascar racing!

Now I did notice once, this was back in the summer of '08, a Nikon shooter was next to me shooting a sporting event. I noticed that his Nikon in burst mode was a lot quieter than my 1D3...this was back when Nikon was breaking new ground -- I think he was shooting maybe a D300. But at the time the Nikon shooters still loved our 5D Classics and 1D3s, so it was all good.


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Watching other photographers....
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