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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Astronomy & Celestial Talk 
Thread started 17 May 2012 (Thursday) 17:01
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eclipse, conflicting information re. need of solar filter

 
swngdncr
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May 17, 2012 17:01 |  #1

I'm seeing conflicting advice in various locations re. the need for a solar filter to photograph the eclipse. I see some posts saying it is essential, and others saying 'don't worry about it, we take pictures with the sun in it all the time.'

So my question is this, assuming a max. reach of 400mm on a crop sensor, can you get a good shot of the eclipse alone w/detail, or would the better approach be to go wider and try for a shot of the eclipse as the background of some interesting foreground? If so, would not a solar filter render all the foreground black? So, do you shoot instead with no filter, or an ND filter?

From what I can tell, unless you have a gargantuan lens or are shooting through a scope or other specialized equipment, you are talking about a relative small sphere, with little detail. Your not going to get a shot like this with 400-500mm, correct? :

http://www.space.com …pse-photo-guide-2012.html (external link)

With 400mm on a crop sensor, can you get a shot of the eclipse alone with enough detail to be interesting, and in this case, is a solar filter then required? Thanks in advance for your help.


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hollis_f
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May 18, 2012 05:29 |  #2

swngdncr wrote in post #14447401 (external link)
With 400mm on a crop sensor, can you get a shot of the eclipse alone with enough detail to be interesting

You sure can. Remember the Sun is about the same size in the sky as is the Moon, and there are loads of examples of Moon photos at 400mm. Here's my Sun image with a 100-400...

IMAGE: http://www.frankhollis.com/temp/Solar%20Filter_20120202_006.jpg

To fill the frame on an APS-C you'll need around 1500mm.

swngdncr wrote in post #14447401 (external link)
and in this case, is a solar filter then required? Thanks in advance for your help.

Yes. Definitely. You will need a proper filter specifically designed for shooting the Sun. An ordinary ND will not block enough IR.


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5Dmaniac
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May 18, 2012 06:00 |  #3

I have read that you need the solar filter before and after the total eclipse but you need to take it off when the full eclipse occurs.




  
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hollis_f
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May 18, 2012 06:04 |  #4

5Dmaniac wrote in post #14449683 (external link)
I have read that you need the solar filter before and after the total eclipse but you need to take it off when the full eclipse occurs.

This is true for a total eclipse, where the whole of the Sun's disc is covered by the Moon. But on Sunday the eclipse is partial or annular - not all of the Sun will be hidden. Even a small sliver of naked Sun can cause damage to eyes and optics when magnified by a big lens.


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swngdncr
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May 18, 2012 10:44 as a reply to  @ hollis_f's post |  #5

Thanks for the information, this is very helpful. I've got a welders #14 glass which after looking around on the net, I think I'll be able to rig into a solar filter. Going to try that today and see if I can get a setup that works and test it out. I realize I'll need to do some major adjustments PP to get the colors right, but it was the only option I had at this late juncture, and in my budget.


You sure can. Remember the Sun is about the same size in the sky as is the Moon, and there are loads of examples of Moon photos at 400mm. Here's my Sun image with a 100-400...

IMAGE: http://www.frankhollis.com/temp/Solar%20Filter_20120202_006.jpg

To fill the frame on an APS-C you'll need around 1500mm.

Yes. Definitely. You will need a proper filter specifically designed for shooting the Sun. An ordinary ND will not block enough IR.[/QUOTE]

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hollis_f
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May 18, 2012 11:39 |  #6

swngdncr wrote in post #14450663 (external link)
Thanks for the information, this is very helpful. I've got a welders #14 glass which after looking around on the net, I think I'll be able to rig into a solar filter.

Just make sure there's no way the filter can fall off during use.


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sigma ­ pi
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May 18, 2012 17:51 |  #7

soooo a few ND filters and polarizer wont cut it?


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Mike ­ Deep
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May 19, 2012 00:31 |  #8

sigma pi wrote in post #14452423 (external link)
soooo a few ND filters and polarizer wont cut it?

They will if you're not into the whole "continued use of eyesight" thing.


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CameraMan
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May 19, 2012 12:09 |  #9

swngdncr wrote in post #14447401 (external link)
or would the better approach be to go wider and try for a shot of the eclipse as the background of some interesting foreground? If so, would not a solar filter render all the foreground black? So, do you shoot instead with no filter, or an ND filter?

I like this idea best. There's so much going on during a solar eclipse especially if you're looking at the ground on a wooded lot. The interesting shapes made by the shadows is quite surreal. I would go this route. The sun will be down by me when this happens so I won't get to experience it this time around.


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sigma ­ pi
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May 19, 2012 15:07 |  #10

Mike Deep wrote in post #14453705 (external link)
They will if you're not into the whole "continued use of eyesight" thing.

I was going to live view and not look in the eye piece :D .... so I am good? :lol:


Thanks for the info. I guess Ill just look at every one elses pics :D


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swngdncr
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May 19, 2012 21:28 |  #11

Still wondering, with the approach of the eclipse being the backdrop to an interesting foreground, so you are not zoomed in on the sun, what kind of filtering is needed? I did rig up a very successful solar filter by using silicon to attach it to a conkin 77mm adapter ring. I then just screw this on to the lens and get no light bleed or anything, but, it is so dark that you can't really get any foreground. If there is a silhouette against the sun itself, that is visible, but very tough to focus on the foreground, especially plant material with the wind blowing. Had trouble getting focus on the sun as well, but just not sure what to expect. This is sort of typical of some of the test shots I got this afternoon...

CameraMan wrote in post #14455234 (external link)
I like this idea best. There's so much going on during a solar eclipse especially if you're looking at the ground on a wooded lot. The interesting shapes made by the shadows is quite surreal. I would go this route. The sun will be down by me when this happens so I won't get to experience it this time around.


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J0eybb
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May 20, 2012 02:10 |  #12

This might be a dumb question. How is this any different than shooting a sunset?


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hollis_f
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May 20, 2012 04:38 |  #13

J0eybb wrote in post #14457862 (external link)
This might be a dumb question. How is this any different than shooting a sunset?

Lift your face up to the mid-day Sun. You can feel the warmth - that's the IR radiation, the stuff that can cause serious damage. Now (well, in several hour's time) turn your face to the setting Sun. You're unlikely to feel much warmth at all. That's because the IR light gets scattered and absorbed by the thicker layer of atmosphere. That's the main reason why you can shoot a sunset, or even look towards the setting Sun itself, and not have your sensor, or eyeballs, cooked.


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J0eybb
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May 20, 2012 18:06 |  #14

hollis_f wrote in post #14458051 (external link)
Lift your face up to the mid-day Sun. You can feel the warmth - that's the IR radiation, the stuff that can cause serious damage. Now (well, in several hour's time) turn your face to the setting Sun. You're unlikely to feel much warmth at all. That's because the IR light gets scattered and absorbed by the thicker layer of atmosphere. That's the main reason why you can shoot a sunset, or even look towards the setting Sun itself, and not have your sensor, or eyeballs, cooked.

Thank You!


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DanFaenza
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May 30, 2012 10:07 |  #15

Speaking of sunset, it appears that the Venus transit is going to be at it's best just before/at sunset here in FL. My question is what type of filter should I use so Venus is actually visible in front of the sun (if any filter at all)?

P.S. I'm thinking of making it a beach day that day and hang out for sunset, just fyi. :)


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eclipse, conflicting information re. need of solar filter
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