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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Transportation Talk 
Thread started 09 Jun 2012 (Saturday) 15:42
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Issues with Suction Cups on paint

 
jrampton
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Jun 09, 2012 15:42 |  #1

Has anyone had any issues using suction cups on vehicle bodywork before ?

I had a situation today where the paint seemed to react to where the cup had been, like a deep groove around the ring and the centre turned to an orange peel effect

The orange peel effect disapeared after about 30mins and the ring became less but is still there, car was later taken to Porsche and they said that the defect seemed to be under the paint ?




  
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ahmad0420
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Jun 10, 2012 09:41 |  #2

Orange peel. Hmm I think that's because of the texture underneath the suction cup itself. You're using Avengers? I've no issue so far. I usually wax the area before and after the suction.

If it's a custom bodypaint, I'm not sure of the effect.


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jrampton
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Jun 10, 2012 10:30 |  #3

Yeah i'm using ARRI F1000 (Manfrotto) Cups

Nope standard paintwork done by Porsche (its a 996 GT3) it had a bonnet respray

I normally never have an issue, i have done loads of cars and never had anything like this happen




  
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jjphoto
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Jun 10, 2012 14:55 |  #4

jrampton wrote in post #14558438 (external link)
Yeah i'm using ARRI F1000 (Manfrotto) Cups

Nope standard paintwork done by Porsche (its a 996 GT3) it had a bonnet respray

I normally never have an issue, i have done loads of cars and never had anything like this happen

Rig Shots 8: Do Vacuum Cups damage paint or panels? (external link)

It's probably happened before but you just haven't noticed it.


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jrampton
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Jun 10, 2012 15:17 as a reply to  @ jjphoto's post |  #5

I always check the surface and have shot using them on many dark cars with no issue. This one however has been painted fairly recently !

If its just in the laquer then it should be able to be sanded and buffed out worst case its going to need to be stripped and repainted but i have insurance for that after my last close call




  
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john ­ owen
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Jun 20, 2012 04:33 |  #6

jrampton wrote in post #14559345 (external link)
I always check the surface and have shot using them on many dark cars with no issue. This one however has been painted fairly recently !

If its just in the laquer then it should be able to be sanded and buffed out worst case its going to need to be stripped and repainted but i have insurance for that after my last close call

Suction cups will mark fresh soft paint regardless of quality of work.

Suction cups will mark old hard paint too but much less noticable and will normally polish out


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jrampton
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Jun 20, 2012 04:40 |  #7

john owen wrote in post #14604766 (external link)
Suction cups will mark fresh soft paint regardless of quality of work.

Suction cups will mark old hard paint too but much less noticable and will normally polish out

I don't agree with that at all, most new vehicles i have done rigshots on have left a thin line of residue on the paint that you can wipe off with your finger / quick wax spray leaving no mark at all.

Like i said i've shot alot of cars and all bar two (one being this one) have left a mark.

In this case though a quick update: The owner took the car back to Porsche and they told him to take it too their recomended valeter who used a swisswax product on it for getting rid of bird lime, left it in the sun for a while and lightly buffed out, there is now no trace of a mark at all and the owner has since reckomended me to two of his friends.

Good outcome but highlights the importance of having insurance cover or to use a waver so that you don't end up having to pay out for repairs or for insurance excess.




  
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john ­ owen
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Jun 20, 2012 05:12 |  #8

New cars have normally been baked as part of the paint process and are less likely to mark. But you will get one that will at some point

If you get dust under the cup or on the paint as it draws in to make suction the hard edge of the cup will make a line, sometimes a ridge

As stated with soft/new paint this can happen and be really obvious - hence you original post fella ;-)a

The point i'm trying to make is it does and can happen, you need to be aware and take suitable precautions. On good hard baked paint chances are it will either rub off or polish out with mild polish

On soft paint, as you have discovered, it can leave a bad mark that may or may not polish out


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Jun 20, 2012 05:17 as a reply to  @ john owen's post |  #9

Think i'm going to stick to using the front and rear screens in future, they are cheaper to replace / repair :D




  
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john ­ owen
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Jun 20, 2012 05:39 |  #10

Fixing on the glass is the best way and as you say cheaper to fix/replace

I was debating fixing to a side glass last week but wasn't sure it was thick enough to take the strain


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Jun 20, 2012 05:45 |  #11

More chance of the rear side glass popping out on the seal i reckon




  
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john ­ owen
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Jun 20, 2012 05:49 |  #12

Either way i decided against it, felt like there would be drama and i was working on my own so no chance of catching the camera if it went !!!


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Jun 20, 2012 05:52 as a reply to  @ john owen's post |  #13

Yeah that would NOT be good lol

I have a disclaimer written up now anyway stating that its unlikely to cause permanent damage but that its their decision to do a rigshot.




  
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john ­ owen
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Jun 27, 2012 06:34 as a reply to  @ jrampton's post |  #14

Had an interesting mark on my subaru from cups on the last two rig shots

The firsts one was in the rain when the car surface was wet, I used a woods film cup with much better grip and load capacity

When the cup was removed there was a clear ridge that you could feel with your finger. I thought it might polish out but decided to leave it

Looked at it a few days later and it had gone

I'm assuming the paint lacquer was drawn up by the suction cup and then over the next few days it 'relaxed' ????


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jrampton
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Jun 27, 2012 06:43 as a reply to  @ john owen's post |  #15

The first car i had an issue with was also wet when i did the rig shot coincidence ?

The GT3 that had the major issue with the laquer and my reason for posting is now fine. A Swiss Wax detailer recomended by the OPC put some product on it designed for bird lime ?? and left it in the sun, a while later it needed a slight polish and it was completely gone !

I think heat maybe the cure here and if it happens again i will maybe try getting some warmth into the panel using either a hot water bottle or a hair dryer (DO NOT USE A HEAT GUN DESIGNED TO STRIP PAINT).




  
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Issues with Suction Cups on paint
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