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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 12 Jun 2012 (Tuesday) 07:33
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when do you use a tripod?

 
tonylong
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Jun 12, 2012 13:03 |  #16

With a car, it's pretty simple to toss a tripod in with your gear if you are out to photograph. And, if you are going to do "scenic" photography, then using a tripod is common sense.

Other types of photography are also served well by using a tripod, such as close-up/macro photography.

When out hiking/biking/extensiv​e walking, a tripod is not so practical, and with me, I'd typically be more inclined to packing a monopod at the most with those scenarios. A monopod can in fact be quite handy if you are shooting birds or wildlife, for example, especially if you are having to "hike in" to where you can find the critters. I have hiked with a tripod, but a monopod can serve quite well and is a lot easier to pack around!


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Tommydigi
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Jun 12, 2012 13:17 |  #17

For hiking and travel I am going to give one of these a try. I can pretty much take something this small and light almost anywhere

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Jun 13, 2012 05:36 |  #18

Studio and when I'm going to use long exposures.


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hollis_f
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Jun 13, 2012 05:49 |  #19

Yno wrote in post #14567803 (external link)
it makes you slow down and think about what you are doing.

I'm so glad that I'm one of those people who can think without having some external restriction to force me into doing so.


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Kolor-Pikker
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Jun 13, 2012 06:26 |  #20

hollis_f wrote in post #14572305 (external link)
I'm so glad that I'm one of those people who can think without having some external restriction to force me into doing so.

I'm going to have to jump on that band wagon. Usually I tend to ignore those kinds of comments, but their frequency is getting fairly annoying.

It's not quite in the same boat as forcing yourself to use primes, because that does build creative thinking, but tripods merely prevent you from taking snapshots (may or may not be a bad thing, there are a lot of great photos that were captured without any planning, but simply being in the right place at the right time).


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Naturalist
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Jun 13, 2012 06:34 |  #21

You should look upon your tripod as being just as important as the lens. Always use the tripod, you're images will be that much sharper.


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hollis_f
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Jun 13, 2012 06:51 |  #22

Naturalist wrote in post #14572385 (external link)
Always use the tripod, your images will be that much sharper.

Depending on what you're shooting. If you have the time to set up a tripod, and your subject isn't going anywhere soon, then this is a reasonable rule. However, for many people it's just not possible. This little guy was hopping around in the undergrowth. If I'd have tried to use a tripod then the result wouldn't have been sharper - it would have been non-existent.

IMAGE: http://www.frankhollis.com/temp/chiffchaff.jpg

For wildlife shooting a tripod is often a major restriction.

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tonylong
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Jun 13, 2012 11:03 |  #23

Naturalist wrote in post #14572385 (external link)
You should look upon your tripod as being just as important as the lens. Always use the tripod, you're images will be that much sharper.

Hmm...if your shooting is limited to "tripod-friendly" shooting, that's well and good for you, but to dictate that as a rule for everyone is, well, not so helpful!


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troehr
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Jun 13, 2012 23:47 |  #24

Most of my photos are taken with a tripod. If it is possible to take the photo with a tripod, I use it. My friends who often go with me, never use a tripod, and actually think I am strange for always carrying and using one. If I have my camera, I have my tripod. It helps my photos.




  
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Clean ­ Gene
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Jun 14, 2012 02:23 |  #25

hollis_f wrote in post #14572431 (external link)
For wildlife shooting a tripod is often a major restriction.

I use a tripod religiously.

That being said, I really DO come into situations in which use of a tripod is a restriction, and it doesn't have anything to do with wildlife.

When it's not a restriction, I use a tripod. When it is a restriction, I don't use a tripod. That's pretty much the gist of how I work.




  
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watt100
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Jun 14, 2012 05:03 |  #26

Tommydigi wrote in post #14568641 (external link)
Really the only time I considering one is for long exposures. .

same here, long exposures (over 1/6 sec.)




  
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Yno
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Jun 14, 2012 08:52 |  #27

hollis_f wrote in post #14572305 (external link)
I'm so glad that I'm one of those people who can think without having some external restriction to force me into doing so.

As can I. But I have seen so many people who can't, or won't. I spent many years using film, where you could not just spray and pray, but I see a lot of younger people with digital cameras doing just that. Maybe I'm wrong (not an uncommon occurrence) but I think their photography would be much improved if they were forced to slow down and carefully compose the shot.


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Yno
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Jun 14, 2012 08:56 |  #28

Kolor-Pikker wrote in post #14567829 (external link)
Impossible? have you ever seen a gimbal-head tripod? It's the only way sports and wildlife photogs can even hope to capture the action when using lenses like the 600/800L

I never mentioned wildlife photography - I was referring to things like NFL football, where I have never seen anything but monopods on the sidelines, and street photography, where spontaneity precludes the use of one.


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Jun 14, 2012 11:46 |  #29

When you are doing a comparison, and want the two photos to have absolutely the minimum of variables


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Jun 14, 2012 11:55 |  #30

Generally when I am doing landscape shooting, I will use it to get maximum sharpness.

It allows for a larger creative window - longer exposures allowing for water blurring/etc


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when do you use a tripod?
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