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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Sports Talk 
Thread started 14 Jun 2012 (Thursday) 00:58
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Which do you prefer when framing?

 
onemoresmash
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Jun 14, 2012 00:58 |  #1

Sorry if it is a bit long but I want to know what method people prefer to get a great tight action shot.

So lets have the settings first:

- It would be a fast paced sport that you don't quite know where the athlete is running to in the next second (for example, badminton at high level, tag games, hockey, or birds, oh that's not a sport:p).
- You stand at a fixed location (thus with a zoom lens).
- Shooting at telephoto focal length say 70-200mm.
- And you want to take a tight shot (in action).

How would you do your framing?

1). Zoomed-in tight w/ eye on viewfinder, keep following the subject (focused), then shoot at the right moment (small zoom adjustment when necessary).
2). Zoomed-out w/ eye on viewfinder, zoom in when action starts and take the shot at peak action.
3). Same as 1). but with the left eye open.
4). Some other methods.

- With 1). it is sometimes hard to follow your subject because a) the unpredictable actions (apply to certain sports) and b) hard to follow a fast subject with unpredictable movement with a zoomed-in telephoto.
- Number 2). would give the photographer a better idea what the subject (athlete) might run to next, but the "zoom in" time and focusing time might cost the shot. And also, by the time you zoomed in, the subject might have gone to another direction already.
- Number 3). seems to have the best of both but it is a bit distracting (at least for me).

What method do you use for this kind of situation?
:eek:


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DC ­ Fan
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Jun 14, 2012 05:46 |  #2

In basketball, distances are so close and the standard 70-200mm lens is such s good match for those distances that there is no loose framing.

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Focal Length: 70.0mm
Aperture: f/2.8
Exposure Time: 0.0020 s (1/500)
ISO equiv: 6400
Exposure Bias: none
Metering Mode: Matrix
Exposure: Manual
Exposure Mode: Manual
White Balance: Auto
Flash Fired: No (enforced)
Orientation: Normal
Color Space: sRGB

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
Byte size: ZERO | Content warning: NOT AN IMAGE


IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
Byte size: ZERO | Content warning: NOT AN IMAGE

For U.S. gridiron football, with the large distances involved and areas that can be covered in a couple of seconds, it's typical to adjust focal lengths as the action approaches or recedes, However, as experience increases, the amount of thought decreases. It's a matter of instincts that are developed over time. Generally, you track the action while looking through the viewfinder and adjust the focal length ring without thinking about steps to follow. You're just trying to get the best framing, while attempting to keep from being run over by the players. To absolutely say framing starts tight or is adjusted wide to compensate, isn't going to work every time or on every play, but it's a useful starting point to just follow the ball. That sort of situation is going to happen on the typical long pass play headed at you, but not every time.

onemoresmash wrote in post #14576665 (external link)
Sorry if it is a bit long but I want to know what method people prefer to get a great tight action shot.

So lets have the settings first:

- It would be a fast paced sport that you don't quite know where the athlete is running to in the next second (for example, badminton at high level, tag games, hockey, or birds, oh that's not a sport:p).
- You stand at a fixed location (thus with a zoom lens).
- Shooting at telephoto focal length say 70-200mm.
- And you want to take a tight shot (in action).

How would you do your framing?

1). Zoomed-in tight w/ eye on viewfinder, keep following the subject (focused), then shoot at the right moment (small zoom adjustment when necessary).
2). Zoomed-out w/ eye on viewfinder, zoom in when action starts and take the shot at peak action.
3). Same as 1). but with the left eye open.
4). Some other methods.

- With 1). it is sometimes hard to follow your subject because a) the unpredictable actions (apply to certain sports) and b) hard to follow a fast subject with unpredictable movement with a zoomed-in telephoto.
- Number 2). would give the photographer a better idea what the subject (athlete) might run to next, but the "zoom in" time and focusing time might cost the shot. And also, by the time you zoomed in, the subject might have gone to another direction already.
- Number 3). seems to have the best of both but it is a bit distracting (at least for me).

What method do you use for this kind of situation?
:eek:




  
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ajaffe
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Jun 14, 2012 23:38 |  #3

You posted those three as good examples?

Shoot both eyes open, a little bit loose so you can crop later. A lot of people want everything shot tight, and cropped tighter, but there is a point where shooting too tight will cut off limbs and body parts, whereas shooting a little bit looser gives you extra leniency to crop, fix horizons if needed, and adjust the framing.

Even in a sport like volleyball and badminton there are tipoffs of where the action will take place, you just have to watch for subtle nuances like posture and eyes. Shooting both eyes open helps paint the whole scene and help you predict those moments.

If you shoot firearms it is a lot like using a red dot sight. Your focus box is the red dot for your camera.


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J.Napier
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Jun 15, 2012 14:17 |  #4

^^^^^This^^^^^


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Biffbradford
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Jun 15, 2012 21:26 |  #5

"Shoot both eyes open". bw!

Especially if you're tracking the action but not shooting yet, you might catch something even better developing out of the corner of your eye. Presto ... the shot of the day! :D


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Jun 16, 2012 18:13 as a reply to  @ Biffbradford's post |  #6

I actually try to do that when shooting baseball. Also, on a baseball note, anticipating action is key. For example, if a runner is on first, there is a very high probability that there will be a double-play attempt, so i focus and stay on second base, more times than not I get a decent shot.


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ajaffe
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Jun 16, 2012 19:18 |  #7

I actually do a lot of eye switching in baseball just because of that. If I am on the third base side, I shoot left eye open, and opposite for the first base side.


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MJPhotos24
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Jun 17, 2012 15:44 |  #8

ajaffe wrote in post #14581522 (external link)
You posted those three as good examples?

Shoot both eyes open, a little bit loose so you can crop later. A lot of people want everything shot tight, and cropped tighter, but there is a point where shooting too tight will cut off limbs and body parts, whereas shooting a little bit looser gives you extra leniency to crop, fix horizons if needed, and adjust the framing.

Even in a sport like volleyball and badminton there are tipoffs of where the action will take place, you just have to watch for subtle nuances like posture and eyes. Shooting both eyes open helps paint the whole scene and help you predict those moments.

If you shoot firearms it is a lot like using a red dot sight. Your focus box is the red dot for your camera.

EXACTLY! Scratching my head on those...

My first "real" editor many years ago was very clear, "give me room to work"...sure you want to shoot tight but not so tight it takes away options.


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dankopp
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Jun 19, 2012 09:16 |  #9

I learned the hard way not to shoot too tight, because I had trouble fixing the horizons without losing limbs.




  
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Dan-o
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Jun 19, 2012 09:58 |  #10

I've learned to shoot a lot looser as I went from selling to riders, to selling to bike and wheel companies.


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Which do you prefer when framing?
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