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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 08 Dec 2006 (Friday) 14:56
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STICKY: Canon DSLRs and Lenses 101

 
csbord
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May 22, 2012 21:38 as a reply to  @ post 3101730 |  #481

That was very informative ! I am a beginner as well and have a 3Ti Rebel would you recommend the same type of lens as I am looking for a telephoto zoom lens as well. Sometimes you can't get too close to your subject but would like to have a closeup. Appreciate your response.




  
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Bill ­ Ng
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May 23, 2012 11:15 |  #482

csbord wrote in post #14471365 (external link)
That was very informative ! I am a beginner as well and have a 3Ti Rebel would you recommend the same type of lens as I am looking for a telephoto zoom lens as well. Sometimes you can't get too close to your subject but would like to have a closeup. Appreciate your response.

Ah, the lens question.

Look - this isn't mathematics. There is no "correct" lens for any application. This is photography, an art form.

How far do you want to be from your subject? When reading specs on a lens, one of the parameters is the MFD or "Minimum Focusing Distance". Longer lenses typically need to be farther away from someone to focus, I believe my 70-200 MFD is around 5 feet or so (there is no Maximum Focusing Distance since any lens can see to Infinity).

My recommendation is this. If you have the 18-55 now, go pick up the 55-250 or the 75-300 (both are inexpensive lenses), and play for a few months. During that time, you'll start to identify which focal lengths work best for the type of photography YOU want to do. Once you've identified that, now you know which lenses to look at for an "upgrade" if you feel you need one.

Don't be one of those noobs who posts, "What's the sharpest lens?" and disregards all other aspects of the product. The one thing you CANNOT change or fix with Photoshop is your focal length. Focal length depicts the distance from the subject which depicts the compression that exists in the photo as well as the working distance from the subject - these are things that make and break a shot.

After you've spent some time shooting with your inexpensive lenses, you'll start to understand the limitations of them and can then make an accurate decision as an educated consumer with regards to which features you want in your next lens. Maybe you're shooting kids or sports and find that non-USM lenses simply don't focus fast enough. Or that your coffee, Snapple, and Crispy Cream breakfast habit makes you shake too much at longer focal lengths which could be helped by lenses with image stabilization. Or maybe you're a clutz and want the added security of a L lens with it's increased build quality. Maybe you enjoy shooting natural light in places that aren't well-lit and need a constant f/2.8 zoom --- or maybe that's not enough and you really need f/1.4 primes.

The reality is that no one can answer these questions for you, you are your own photographer and you need to make the pictures that YOU enjoy. The only way you'll know what you need is to start with a few inexpensive lenses and see where they take you. Good luck and let me know if you have any questions.


Billy Ng
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4 Lenses
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Edwin ­ Herdman
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May 24, 2012 00:43 |  #483

Bill, I respectfully have to differ. While you can use any lens / camera combination artistically, a set application may well call for a specific lens. Birding is a great example - lots of people try to take photos of birds at the birdbath with a short zoom, and just blow it up on the monitor. This doesn't compare well against a long lens. Even in "true" long lenses, the difference between a 400mm and an 600mm (or so) lens is quite remarkable for this application. The longer lens helps the photographer get more out of their skills in this case.

Also, given that you emphasized the artistic values of photography, why restrict the recommendation to zoom lenses? I started out with a 50mm lens and used nothing but that for months. I think we agree that a large part of the art is thinking and imagining your way around obstacles and limitations. I only mention the beginner's prime lens approach because it's a good way to really drill on the fundamentals of exposure while simplifying learning the camera's own programmatic quirks.

Ultimately the zoom recommendation is making a very specific kind of recommendation to the user, and I think there's no harm in revealing the wider range of choices to a beginner. Especially in the case that somebody is serious about using certain lenses for applications, starting out with the equipment they'd end up buying later will only save them money. For example, I fooled around with a 120-400mm zoom which has only cost me money (although the lens I use in its place wasn't released until last year, but that's a kind of rare case).

The first question has to be what kind of photography a person wants to engage in. If you want maximum flexibility and lower carrying requirements, generally a person will benefit from a zoom lens (although I might ask what "flexibility" means - sometimes flexibility means a lens with a macro setting, or the ability to use a teleconverter). If you want maximum artistic control, a stable of prime lenses will be very helpful. Expenses and reality probably land us somewhere in between.

Bill Ng wrote in post #14473717 (external link)
The reality is that no one can answer these questions for you [...] The only way you'll know what you need is to start with a few inexpensive lenses and see where they take you. Good luck and let me know if you have any questions.

It looks to me like you set out to do just that - answer the questions - with the zoom recommendation, which is inconsistent with your own advice!

Just to make it clear what I'm about, I think that everybody goes down the same path - with some detours, and making allowance for creative differences - in learning photography. But the best way to learn what really works is to read everything you can on different lenses, view images, compare prices, and then make a decision. A good photographer can provide the technical advice, but that's about it.




  
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Clarky101
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May 24, 2012 23:11 |  #484

Cheers for this!!! I'm another newbie aswell.


Canon EOS 5D Mark II
EF 50 f/1.8 II | EF 17-40 f/4L USM

  
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samuelpark0125
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Jun 28, 2012 12:50 |  #485

I am getting used to determine Exposure triangle and WB balance. Do you think I should use M or Av/Tv to learn more but at the same time take a reasonably good photo?


T3i I 18-55 I 17-55 I 100

  
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TejasPOWER
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Location: The Country of TEXAS!
     
Jun 30, 2012 16:46 |  #486

Damn, what a great forum and sticky!
Thanks for the informative post!


Canon T3i | Luma CINCH | Motorsport fan -BMW, TOYOTA & MINI | BMWCCA (external link) | TTORA (external link)
Always looking to learn and to be better than before.

  
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mjayadev
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Jul 01, 2012 18:44 |  #487

Great thread. Very informative.




  
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mjayadev
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Jul 01, 2012 18:45 |  #488

I couldn't find any thread on reading MTF charts . I would appreciate if you anyone point me to one.




  
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lancebroad
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Jul 01, 2012 22:35 |  #489

samuelpark0125 wrote in post #14644580 (external link)
I am getting used to determine Exposure triangle and WB balance. Do you think I should use M or Av/Tv to learn more but at the same time take a reasonably good photo?

When I first got into photography I used AV then advanced on to full manual once I understood how a changing of f stop or ISO made a change to the shutter speed. Depends how you learn, if you like to jump in the deep end, go full Manual (M) or if you want to take it in (AV)

As of now, I set my ISO, aperture and then just shoot AV then i dont need to worry about shutter speed and let the camera determine it. Because i shoot in RAW I have a fair bit of leeway.


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shakurbizerte
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Jul 04, 2012 16:53 |  #490

Good info. [IMG]:)




  
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femalephotographer
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Joined Jul 2012
Location: Pakistan
     
Jul 14, 2012 15:20 |  #491

thank you for the information..
it really helped me alot




  
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shakurbizerte
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Joined Jul 2012
     
Jul 22, 2012 09:22 |  #492

Good info. Its not "perfect" as others pointed out but for someone that knows absolutely nothing or very little this is a great wealth of knowledge.[IMG]:)




  
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Yarik
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Jul 26, 2012 04:15 |  #493

Yes, always good to have a refresher like this. Too bad all i've been doing last few weeks is just reading this forum and read a couple of books on photography. On vacation in Ukraine, but cant find much to shoot around the house/yard or within a few hundred feet of the yard, and the wife is too scared that i'll get robbed if i go too far in search of scenery and whatnot.


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Past: T2i / EF 50mm 1.8 II / Sigma 17-70mm 2.8-4.0 / 430EX II / EF 24-105mm 4.0L

  
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MuTTaL888
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Aug 10, 2012 22:58 |  #494

Good info here, thanks.




  
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Wilt
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Aug 11, 2012 00:01 |  #495

mjayadev wrote in post #14657829 (external link)
I couldn't find any thread on reading MTF charts . I would appreciate if you anyone point me to one.

http://www.luminous-landscape.com …s/understanding​-mtf.shtml (external link)

http://www.zeiss.de …ile/CLN_MTF_Kur​ven_EN.pdf (external link)


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