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Thread started 02 May 2006 (Tuesday) 19:04
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Question about spot metering

 
exile
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May 03, 2006 14:06 as a reply to  @ post 1470761 |  #16

Simon King wrote:
Ulster eh?:D
Used to live in Co Down as a lad, place called Rostrevor near Warrenpoint nr Newry;)

I'm from the other end of County Down...Bangor to be precise:)


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May 03, 2006 14:12 as a reply to  @ post 1468208 |  #17

Keiffer wrote:
For a bird, Meter off the blue sky and add 1. If you metered off the white bird, it would be gray. And you can make a light or bright backround dark without throwing everything off, as far as I know.

This is interesting. I am often in my backyard taking photos of birds against the sky, a bush, the ground, a wall and I do not always have good luck with the spot metering. I mostly find that the birds are underexposed. Is there a fast and loose rule for these situations other than always adding 2/3 to 1 stop? Like the person who started this thread I am also trying to master more perfect metering but with a Rebel XT.


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Davidsl222
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May 03, 2006 14:14 as a reply to  @ post 1469720 |  #18

PacAce wrote:
Spot meter off the white part of the bird. Since it's white, you will need to add 1 1/2 to 1 2/3 stop of EC (maybe even more) to get the bird exposed properly. Check the histogram after taking the shot and adjust the EC as necessary.

If the bird is black, use negative 1 1/2 to 1 2/3 EC.

Sorry to be stupid. What is EC?


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Jon
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May 03, 2006 14:17 |  #19

EC = Exposure Compensation. When you've taken an exposure reading you can add EC by clicking the Quick Dial a couple of notches down or up. Or you can manually calculate the adjustment if you're working in M mode.


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Davidsl222
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May 03, 2006 14:19 |  #20

Simon, that was great info. I should have read that more carefully before posting my two previous messages.


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Davidsl222
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May 03, 2006 14:20 as a reply to  @ Jon's post |  #21

Jon wrote:
EC = Exposure Compensation. When you've taken an exposure reading you can add EC by clicking the Quick Dial a couple of notches down or up. Or you can manually calculate the adjustment if you're working in M mode.

Jon, thank you.


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May 03, 2006 15:03 as a reply to  @ exile's post |  #22

exile wrote:
I'm from the other end of County Down...Bangor to be precise:)

Beautiful; if wet!;)


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May 03, 2006 15:28 as a reply to  @ Davidsl222's post |  #23

Davidsl222 wrote:
This is interesting. I am often in my backyard taking photos of birds against the sky, a bush, the ground, a wall and I do not always have good luck with the spot metering. I mostly find that the birds are underexposed. Is there a fast and loose rule for these situations other than always adding 2/3 to 1 stop? Like the person who started this thread I am also trying to master more perfect metering but with a Rebel XT.

Birds against the sky:where is the light coming from that is lighting them? Often underneath them!
Against a bush: + On the ground: a black bird spot metered will come out greytoned, a white brid will come out greytoned, only a grey toned brid will come out correctly exposed

Unless you FILL the spot metering circle with you subject you will also be metering more than the bird

Spot metering is , I suggest, almost impossible for moving subjects, at least you need to be VERY experienced

Start by putting different things in the garden, a tin of beans, a white bag, a black bag, something highly reflective, a miirror

Spot meter then until you get the results you want

Practice, Practice, Practice
:D :D :D :D :D
;) ;) ;) ;) ;) ;)


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May 03, 2006 15:35 |  #24

Simon that was good and very practical advice. Thank you.

Taking it another step. What items might you spot meter off of to get a good reading for a colored, white, black bird, or animal when out on a trail photographing?


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May 03, 2006 15:50 as a reply to  @ Davidsl222's post |  #25

Davidsl222 wrote:
Simon that was good and very practical advice. Thank you.

Taking it another step. What items might you spot meter off of to get a good reading for a colored, white, black bird, or animal when out on a trail photographing?

did you see here?
https://photography-on-the.net …php?p=1469728&p​ostcount=9

You can meter for the bird but you need to use EC to get the tone (exposure) you want

Practice, Practice,Practice;)


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Davidsl222
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May 03, 2006 17:32 |  #26

Yes, forgot about that post. Thanks again Simon. Your info was valuable. I was just starting to use EC, but intuitively. I'll try your suggestions.


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May 03, 2006 18:04 as a reply to  @ Davidsl222's post |  #27

Davidsl222 wrote:
Yes, forgot about that post. Thanks again Simon. Your info was valuable. I was just starting to use EC, but intuitively. I'll try your suggestions.

I still don't use EC even myself... I am still stuck in the old days of one shot at a time, so if a reading needs altering I justdo it in manual, but then I don't shoot sports

I think the problem with modern cameras is that they have so many options that te basics of good photographic technique arten't being taught in any kind of a systematic way, it's all rather hit and miss, which is OK , but can get really frustrating for soem

My recommendation is always to teach yourself starting with one prime lens and MANUAL exposure. Stick to one ISO and one exposure mode. Just practice gettig consistant shots with that set up , taking readings, setting the aperture and shutter speed manually, loo at the results, keep going until it makes sense ( it won't take as long as you tink).THEN you'll understand ALL the rest of the stuff.

If you get the chance look at the zone system - I bet you can find all about it on the net. When I first reasd Ansel adams book on it , It was really hard for me to learn, the concepts were so new, I was learning and reading one word at atime. But it was worth it.

What I persoannly am trying to do is to get more into B+W (WHEN do I have the time?!!!)
So if that interests you look here:
http://com1.runboard.c​om/bthedigitalmonochro​meforum (external link)


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May 03, 2006 18:14 as a reply to  @ post 1470759 |  #28

judyg wrote:
Thank you Simon, that helps a lot.

I hope so, the thing is we really do have to practice!

The easiest way is to set up white, black, and grey objects (paper, plastic whatever) and meter off them,in the sun, in the shade, indoors etc, try EC with them , see what happens, just get used to what the meter does


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May 03, 2006 19:33 |  #29

Spot metering doesn't have to point at 18% grey...you can point a spot meter at the brightest/lightest part of the scene and then at the darkest part of the scene to assess the range of brightness in the scene which you are trying to capture. If the range is 7 EV but your camera only captures 5 EV max range, then you get to decide the 'placement' of the exposure to set the scene for what is important for you. Or in studio shooting you get to adjust the lights so that the entire scene falls within the range of brightness which can be reproduced (for example, printed page reproduces a narrower range than a phtographic silver-based print)

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May 04, 2006 03:11 as a reply to  @ Wilt's post |  #30

Wilt wrote:
Spot metering doesn't have to point at 18% grey...you can point a spot meter at the brightest/lightest part of the scene and then at the darkest part of the scene to assess the range of brightness in the scene which you are trying to capture. If the range is 7 EV but your camera only captures 5 EV max range, then you get to decide the 'placement' of the exposure to set the scene for what is important for you. Or in studio shooting you get to adjust the lights so that the entire scene falls within the range of brightness which can be reproduced (for example, printed page reproduces a narrower range than a phtographic silver-based print)

--wilt

This is very true!
But it can take a while to get the darkest and lightest points on some scenes, not ideal for any thing that moves but great for landscape studies

You can set the LCD histo to show clipping at either end I believe and could use that as another technique to determine exposure range

The possibilities are endless;)


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