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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 27 Jul 2012 (Friday) 14:24
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Feathering a beauty dish

 
JakAHearts
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Jul 27, 2012 14:24 |  #1

I just started working with a beauty dish and am having a bit of trouble. I know that the light is more specular than the softboxes I normally use but it seems excessive. When I am feathering the dish, should I do it so slightly that the flash tube isnt visible to the subject? Im also getting a really bad double shadow which I think might be from having the flash tube exposed as well. Its a kacey dish if anyone is curious.


Shane
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dmward
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Jul 27, 2012 14:50 |  #2

In my view, a beauty dish is intended to be used straight on.
Feathering is too likely to cause problems, as you are experiencing.

I see a lot of images on the fora that the shooter claims is a beauty dish shot but it has a sock on it which, IMO, turns it into a soft box.

The point of a BD for me is the more specular light with softer shadow transitions but not the hugh wrap that one can get with a softbox.


David | Sharing my Insights, Knowledge & Experience (external link) | dmwfotos website (external link)

  
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JakAHearts
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Jul 27, 2012 15:03 |  #3

Interesting. Perhaps Ill try it straight on. Perhaps I deserve a "Duh" :D


Shane
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MrScott
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Jul 27, 2012 16:25 |  #4

You really should have the central reflector installed and blocking all 'stray' light from the subject and or visible background. The point is to reflect the light into the dish so that its shape, surface and apparent size are used to provide the 'beauty' style lighting. Without the bounce, light from your bulb has no benefit of the dish.

This is so much more than just a Dish video - Enjoy your "Duh" moment.
http://www.youtube.com​/watch?v=ZtIkhvNH1X0 (external link)




  
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Feathering a beauty dish
FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
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