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Thread started 05 Aug 2012 (Sunday) 20:56
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Backpack recommendations; specific

 
ntotrr
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Aug 07, 2012 20:55 |  #16

Sent you a PM.




  
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a_roadbiker
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Aug 08, 2012 11:29 |  #17

I started with the Canon backpack and it served me well. When it started falling apart after a few years, I went on the hunt for a replacement. I ended up with the Ape Case ACPRO1900 and so far I am very happy with it. I wrote a review of it here and you can read it by following this link: https://photography-on-the.net …11496&highlight​=ACPRO1900

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Kyan
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Aug 08, 2012 18:49 as a reply to  @ a_roadbiker's post |  #18

Take a look at the Clik Elite website if you want to take camera gear on backpacking or hiking trips. Clikelite.com
Kyan




  
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danster
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Aug 11, 2012 07:59 |  #19

Try the Kata Bumblebee UL222. I've had it for about a year now. Light, well padded and durable.


  
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baj2k
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Aug 11, 2012 13:21 |  #20

Remeber, you said be specific... and before I start I'd like to comment that I wouldn't buy any knockoff bags on eBay. In my experience cheap labor is not the only reason they cost less. If you can verify that they are real NatGeo bags then maybe, but for me, I like Amazon or other no hassles, no problems, no PayPal, money back guaranteed, retail locations. :D

Mini review: National Geographic NG W5070 Walkabout Medium Rucksack Bag

Although I don't own this bag I have a friend who has one an I did travel with him so I saw one in action in the field in Maui. I almost bought one myself but decided I needed a smaller sling/torso type bag so I went with the Kata LighTri-317 PL Torso Pack (which I love). Here's what I noticed about the NatGeo bags while trekking off the beaten path with my buddy on Maui:

PROS:
They are very rugged bags with solid zippers, strong Velcro, large compartments, and great for travel as an over night pack because you can get quite a bit of camera gear and still have room for a laptop, clothes, food, etc. I was surprised at how much stuff he could get in the bag (all his gear and thnkfully his lunch and mine too one day because my lunch wouldn't fit in my Kata 317 :cool: ). The pockets are large which is both good and bad, I'll focus on the good here in the "pros" section and the bad later in the "cons". One problem I have is many camera bags I've had, seen, and used, that have lots of pockets is that they're often just a bit too small for me to fit what I want in them. The old "damn I wish this was 5 or 10mm wider so I could fit my <whatever> in here..." happens to me alot on my other backpack (seems a lot less likely on the NatGeo). The NatGeo pockets are larger than what I find on most bags that have lots of pockets. When you open the top "flap" you can use it as a clean surface to set you gear on (you'll see what I mean in video 1 below). I can't overstate the utility of this when you're out in the field and everything that's flat around you is either dirty, wet, grimey, or all three (remember the outside material of the bag is water repellent so much less likely to absorb dirt and grime). The flat, padded, white cloth lined top flap of the bag is safe haven for delicate objects when in the field. As I stated earlier the material is as rugged as it gets. You be hard pressed to rip the bag unless you fell off a cliff or rolled down the side of a mountain in which case damage to you would likely be more of an issue :shock:. It's very water repellant but not waterproof. The straps fit comfortably although I noticed my friend adjusting them a couple times during the day so it appears that they can slip and loosen a bit so you may want to knot the ends or use a Velcro loop to stop that very minor nit.

CONS:
The laptop goes in a compartment that's is right up against your back (like many bags - see video 1) and you can feel it somewhat as you hike if you have a large laptop and also when you sit down to rest on a trek. If you're like me and like to lean back a bit against your bag your putting all that weight against the laptop which could flex, tweak, or maybe even damage it if your a big guy like me (6'2" 240lbs - or 12 stone for our Commonwealth friends). The large pockets I spoke of earlier as a "pro" also have a "con" and that is they have no little mini compartments or mesh pockets inside them for putting smaller stuff in. You either need to buy a bunch little "do-dad" bags for everything (SD/CF's, batteries, cords, etc.) to segregate your stuff or just dump them in all together. I wish it had a padded waist belt to help balance the load. There's no flap that would let you slide it over the handle of a "roller" type carry-on luggage bag so you can't secure it to that bag and wheel them both around easily (you can wrap the shoulder straps around but it's a kludge and not as secure).

CONCLUSION:
Overall I'd say if you need a rugged bag that can handle the "outback" and still be functional on urban treks then this bag deserves a strong consideration. It's priced extremely well considering the materials and the fact it has a marketable brand name. Another huge plus is that it doesn't look like a camera bag so you don't have a huge "steal me/rob me" sign on your back as you hike around and/or travel. I'd say overall I give it an 8.5/10 with a point knocked off for the "cons" and a 1/2 point because I'm a picky SoB and everything starts of at a 9.5/10 with me and only gets worse. :rolleyes: :cool:

Would I buy this bag: Yes, without hesitation. It's on my Amazon Wishlist :cool:

VIDEO REVIEWS - a 2nd Opinion:
Here's a couple video reviews. Both are good but the one that's not in English is very helpful showing how much "stuff" you can fit in the bag.

National Geographic NG W5070 Walkabout Medium Rucksack Bag - non-English (external link)

National Geographic NG W5070 Walkabout Medium Rucksack Bag - English (UK) (external link)




  
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jrm27
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Aug 12, 2012 13:08 |  #21

I'd take a look at the Moutainsmith Borealis AT (external link). I use it in the exact fashion, camera gear in the bottom and clothes on top. It has a tripod mount system on it as well as an included rain cover.

I lugged it around the East Coast for a week and will be taking it (and only it) to Kenya with me in a few weeks. I'd definitely recommend this bag.

I decided on this one because it was a little more rugged, offered me the space I wanted, and it didn't really look like a camera bag. Mountainsmith's stuff is great.

-jon


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baj2k
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Aug 12, 2012 13:27 |  #22

jrm27 wrote in post #14848576 (external link)
I'd take a look at the Moutainsmith Borealis AT (external link). I use it in the exact fashion, camera gear in the bottom and clothes on top. It has a tripod mount system on it as well as an included rain cover.

I lugged it around the East Coast for a week and will be taking it (and only it) to Kenya with me in a few weeks. I'd definitely recommend this bag.

I decided on this one because it was a little more rugged, offered me the space I wanted, and it didn't really look like a camera bag. Mountainsmith's stuff is great.

-jon

Nice rugged bag. But, it don't see how you could configure it so you could have anything except maybe a 50mm or a "pancake" lens on camera when it's in the pack. It seems more like a camping backpack that you can put camera stuff in too. Maybe I'm missing something (a regular occurance :cool:) but do you have to take out the camera, attach your bigger lens, snap a few pictures, remove the lens, cap everything up, and then put camera back in the bag, every time you want to shoot something along the way?

Maybe there is a way to swizzle the devider pads to have say a Canon 16-35mm, 17-40mm, 70-200mm attached to the camera at all times when it's stowed in the bag, yes/no? If there is that would be great but from their pictures and diagram I don't see how. If not, that would be a big drawback.




  
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jrm27
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Aug 12, 2012 14:04 |  #23

Yes, all the pads in the camera block are customizable. They can all be moved, rearranged, removed, etc... Even the panel that divides the camera section from the top section can be removed.

When I was traveling a few months ago I had a 5D with a 24-70 attached in one portion of the block, and then a t2i with a 50mm attached in another. In another section I put in a Zoom H1, a Rode Videomic Pro, batteries, chargers, cards, etc... The compartments are rather deep and more stuff could have been fit in.

I dont know about a 70-200. I dont have one, but with some creative moving of the divider panels, I'd think you could make it work.

I just pulled out the camera block, threw some gear in, and took a picture (with my phone).. maybe it'll help? This isn't packed well, just packed to show how things fit. I'm sure with more careful packing, it can be massaged to fit many different situations.

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on the left is a Zoom h1 and a Rode VideomicPro with deadcat, in the middle is the t2i with a 50mm mounted. Honestly there's enough room vertically above that camera if it is pressed all the way to the bottom of the block for another body of similar size to be stacked on top, another lens, etc... (of course you'd want to put some padding in between) On the right is a 5D with a 24-70 mounted.

The bag has a laptop sleeve that I kept an ipad in. The main top compartment held some jeans, some t-shirts, a lightweight coat, some toiletries, etc... It had to be packed right, but it all fit just fine. I must have walked about 30 miles with this on my back and it carried very well. The integrated rain cover came in very handy and worked great. The hip straps tuck away into the back of the bag if they're not needed, and the compression straps really came in handy too.

http://www.flickr.com/​photos/jrmelot/ (external link)

  
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baj2k
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Aug 12, 2012 14:41 |  #24

Wow, that's much roomier and far more versatile than their website shows. You should send them your pictures to use... hmm... :confused: I need to look into this bag a bit more too... thanks for the pic. It's a big help...




  
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sixtwo
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Aug 12, 2012 21:52 |  #25

The mountainsmith is a nice bag too, looks like amazon has some used for $127. I was looking at the Oakley Kitchen Sink since it has a bottom compartment. Thinking maybe I could add some camera padding to it. But it's a little flashy and might cause problems with TSA or something, who knows. I think it's between the Nat Geo bag, the photosport 200 and this mountainsmith bag....


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jrm27
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Aug 12, 2012 22:50 |  #26

It really is a nice bag. If you have any specific questions, or want to see pictures of anything in particular, I'd be glad to help.


http://www.flickr.com/​photos/jrmelot/ (external link)

  
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hienz
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Aug 15, 2012 17:32 |  #27

Yes, the mountainsmith is a very rugged bag. Built with nice materials. I have one for sale in the marketplace if you're interested.


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Backpack recommendations; specific
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