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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos The Business of Photography 
Thread started 11 Aug 2012 (Saturday) 22:09
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What you get for giving freebie

 
teaco
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Aug 12, 2012 02:31 |  #16

I guess so. I also wonder if they knew how many hours is behind the extra work i did. I might consider itemising how long some of the extra jobs take in the invoice so they are aware of what they got in the final product. At the end of the day i did the extra stuff to help them out. They may be unaware just how much i did.

I think i'll continue giving a few extra freebies here and there, but make sure people know what they are getting. Although i am generally just being a nice guy, i do expect thanks, in the same way that if you helped someone in the street you would expect an appropriate thanks. Doing approx 1 day additional work for someone deserves more that just a two-word email when the final product is delivered. They are good guys so i will definitely pop in and see them when i'm next in their area to see how they are using the photos.


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Aug 12, 2012 02:34 |  #17

JacobPhoto wrote in post #14847130 (external link)
Hopefully you would use the correct form "You're welcome" :lol:

:p

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Aug 12, 2012 02:41 |  #18

teaco wrote in post #14847137 (external link)
People take the time to post all sort of things, including thoughts, feelings and conversation starters. This isn't a rant, so apologies if it comes across like that. I'm just putting my thoughts out there. If i didn't get a reply at all i would probably have said 'Wow, i did all this extra work and didn't even get a thank you. I'm wondering if they appreciate the extra effort.

I guess i am looking at how i would reply if someone did a lot of extra work for me to help out. I would sent a longer email to show i appreciate/acknowledge the effort. It's not big deal, i am just surprised sometimes that some people do not show appreciation for a favour in the same way i would. Perhaps i am getting a little old-fashioned ;)

...yeah, but how does your client know how much extra effort you went to? You gave them some extra photos and designed an advert for them. Did they ask for the advert or the extra photos? If they didn't and if they don't have a need for any extra stuff, why would you really expect anything other than a thank you?

You are in business. When you get paying clients they will react in all sorts of different ways and "thank you" is probably the least offensive one you will ever strike. Its not personal.


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teaco
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Aug 12, 2012 04:11 |  #19

I thinking they probably don't know the full extent of the work involved. However, the extra work was done in response to their ideas and needs. I think you are right when you say it's not personal; they were probably busy and just fired off a one-liner email. I guess this is what happens with email communication. If it were a phonecall or letter then you would never just state two words. Still, a good lesson to let them know just how much is being done additionally rather than just assuming.


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mattmorgan44
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Aug 12, 2012 05:43 |  #20

teaco wrote in post #14847179 (external link)
I guess so. I also wonder if they knew how many hours is behind the extra work i did. I might consider itemising how long some of the extra jobs take in the invoice so they are aware of what they got in the final product. At the end of the day i did the extra stuff to help them out. They may be unaware just how much i did.

I think i'll continue giving a few extra freebies here and there, but make sure people know what they are getting. Although i am generally just being a nice guy, i do expect thanks, in the same way that if you helped someone in the street you would expect an appropriate thanks. Doing approx 1 day additional work for someone deserves more that just a two-word email when the final product is delivered. They are good guys so i will definitely pop in and see them when i'm next in their area to see how they are using the photos.

Woah I think we have a bigger issue here. A full day of work extra? How much time was involved in the work they hired you to do? It's nice to be generous and help a business you believe in etc. but that seems very excessive. This leads me to believe there could be more to the email than I originally thought. Maybe they now feel uncomfortable because of how much free work you provided- If the advert isn't something they needed they could even be a little annoyed -Maybe they now assume these free working hours are a service that is normal when hiring you, part of the package they hired you to do, and wish you talked to them to put the hours into a product they need. That amount of work could have them thinking many things.

Really, we won't ever know what they are thinking if anything at all. But a full day of work seems very very excessive to me, depending on the original job.


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Aug 12, 2012 06:04 |  #21

JacobPhoto wrote in post #14847130 (external link)
Hopefully you would use the correct form "You're welcome" :lol:

Hopefully = 'in a hopeful manner'.

Better grammatically to use the active verb form 'I hope . . . '

In 2010 the AP Stylebook finally joined British sub-editors in prohibiting the use of "hopefully" as a disjunct.

:p


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Aug 12, 2012 06:08 |  #22

mattmorgan44 wrote in post #14847467 (external link)
Woah I think we have a bigger issue here. A full day of work extra? How much time was involved in the work they hired you to do? It's nice to be generous and help a business you believe in etc. but that seems very excessive. This leads me to believe there could be more to the email than I originally thought. Maybe they now feel uncomfortable because of how much free work you provided- If the advert isn't something they needed they could even be a little annoyed -Maybe they now assume these free working hours are a service that is normal when hiring you, part of the package they hired you to do, and wish you talked to them to put the hours into a product they need. That amount of work could have them thinking many things.

Really, we won't ever know what they are thinking if anything at all. But a full day of work seems very very excessive to me, depending on the original job.

...yep.

teaco: I'll ask the question again because I don't think your answer was clear: did they ask you to do the advert? Because businesses don't normally ask photographers to do adverts for them. Were you supplied with a brief for the advert? The copy? Because the way you have worded things it sounds like you've given them an advert unsolicited and based the advert on what you thought they wanted. And if you did that to me, I would think you were a bit weird.

As a business you shouldn't be doing things for "thanks." You should be doing things for money, or the potential of money. Why would you itemize work in your invoice for stuff they didn't order? That would make sense if they ordered something and you gave it as a freebee: but this is the complete opposite. I think you need to sit down and rethink your whole approach.


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Aug 12, 2012 06:24 |  #23

I wouldn't be worried by that reply. It will pay off down the track. They are a paying customer getting something extra they didn't ask for, not your Mum getting a special birthday present.

I frequently order various things from online shops and trust me, I remember which ones send little freebies or personal touches along. I have never really "thanked" them for throwing in freebies I didn't even ask for ( I and they know why they are doing it) but they make an impression on me nonetheless.


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mattmorgan44
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Aug 12, 2012 06:37 |  #24

banquetbear wrote in post #14847488 (external link)
...why would you itemize work in your invoice for stuff they didn't order? That would make sense if they ordered something and you gave it as a freebee: but this is the complete opposite. I think you need to sit down and rethink your whole approach.

I have just assumed they didn't ask for it.

Also, that is a good point the OP should consider. If you itemize for items they never wanted and put "free" on the invoice, I think you will loose customers. They will think it is un-professional, may think differently of you, or worse they will think they are paying for it in one form or another (like your prices are higher than they would otherwise be).

EmyB wrote in post #14847507 (external link)
I wouldn't be worried by that reply. It will pay off down the track. They are a paying customer getting something extra they didn't ask for, not your Mum getting a special birthday present.

I frequently order various things from online shops and trust me, I remember which ones send little freebies or personal touches along. I have never really "thanked" them for throwing in freebies I didn't even ask for ( I and they know why they are doing it) but they make an impression on me nonetheless.

All true, as long as the small freebie doesn't turn into something more. A full day of work for a photographer might be beyond a freebie in the sense you are talking about.


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tomj
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Aug 12, 2012 14:39 as a reply to  @ teaco's post |  #25

"I'll ask the question again because I don't think your answer was clear: did they ask you to do the advert?"

Good question. If this is something they didn't talk to you about, or didn't want, they may actually feel awkward about it, maybe even see it as presumtive on your part.

My experienced is that giving a customer a little freebie (little being key) is a way of showing your gratitude for their business that they can appreciate. A gift of substantial value may be viewed as inappropriate on several levels.


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Aug 12, 2012 16:49 |  #26

1) Provide your client an invoice with a $0 balance to show the value of your favor.
2) Provide the client with free poster prints of your work with you logo and contact information clearly visable.
3) The worst thing you can do is to respond negatively to a potential client you have already courted.


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Aug 12, 2012 21:42 |  #27

sspellman wrote in post #14849452 (external link)
1) Provide your client an invoice with a $0 balance to show the value of your favor.
2) Provide the client with free poster prints of your work with you logo and contact information clearly visable.
3) The worst thing you can do is to respond negatively to a potential client you have already courted.

#1 is risky business. Don't know if you have followed the thread but he did a full day of work as a "gift". As a few people have already said, sending an invoice for work they never wanted, even with a zero dollar balance, may do a lot more harm than good. For reasons already discussed.


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Aug 12, 2012 22:07 as a reply to  @ mattmorgan44's post |  #28

Perhaps they thought the freebie was you, a photographer, pitching for an ad job and it wasn't the tone or copy they wanted?


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Aug 13, 2012 09:57 |  #29

Voaky999 wrote in post #14846775 (external link)
I find thank yous in general are in pretty short supply these days.

That's I take special effort to give meaningful thank you messages to clients.


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prakashpn
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Aug 13, 2012 09:59 |  #30

I can only remember the quote
"when you are good at something do not do it for free."




  
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