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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Weddings & Other Family Events Talk 
Thread started 11 Aug 2012 (Saturday) 20:56
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Is having inconsistency between your pictures normal?

 
5W0L3
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Aug 11, 2012 20:56 |  #1

I'm talking about mainly at nightclubs / low light night time indoor receptions where light is constantly changing (DJ Lights) etc... do you guys get inconsistency amongst your pictures? I'm finding that I have to spend a lot of time editing my pictures to make them look good, as where I am expecting them to come out good out of the camera.. is this asking for too much in those conditions?


How do you guys normally shoot these kind of events?.. Also a lot of my pictures come out very orange in colour (skin tones) due to the ambient light at the venues, even though I use bounce flash to light up subjects.. what am i doing wrong.. please help!


My typical settings are using two lenses / two bodies... 35/85mm combo... shutter speeds are usually around 1/125 to allow for some ambient light.. Apertures range from f/1.2 - f/4 depending on how people are standing (in a straight line or an arch).. ISO is usually set to 1600 or 3200.


Manav
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Joe ­ Ravenstein
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Aug 11, 2012 22:04 |  #2

Generally only if I am bracketing shots. If you are not sure of what settings to use you need to bracket to get one in the ballpark. I try to stay in the 100 iso range to minimize my time spent pp. You didn't mention what color balance you are using, that will have an effect on the final product. Most cameras have tungsten,flouro and daylight balance.Try different light source settings.


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5W0L3
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Aug 11, 2012 22:29 |  #3

100 ISO?.. do you mean 1000?.. at 100 ISO any flash would overheat after a while.

I normally use Auto white balance for these events.


Manav
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jackinavox
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Aug 12, 2012 00:14 |  #4

An easy approach i would suggest would be to set your flash to ETTL, pointed up with bounce card up (or use a diffuser), then expose for the ambient light (maybe iso 800, 1/30, f5.6). With that setting you should be able to get groups of people in focus and have the ambient light in the background. Play around with your FEC setting until ou get the desired look.

Hope that helps :)


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Red ­ Tie ­ Photography
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Aug 12, 2012 14:28 |  #5

Can you post up some images?


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jackinavox
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Aug 12, 2012 17:03 |  #6

Red Tie Photography wrote in post #14848862 (external link)
Can you post up some images?

here are a couple.. :)

IMAGE: http://candycapco.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/bradhayleywedding64.jpg

IMAGE: http://candycapco.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/bradhayleywedding62.jpg

IMAGE: http://candycapco.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/bradhayleywedding63.jpg

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Luxury
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Aug 12, 2012 17:08 |  #7

My style of shooting night life photos is a little different from yours.

Setup was as follows:

Canon Rebel XSi w/ 18-50mm sigma f/2.8 @ f/4.5 — 1/13s
430exII on camera giving focus assist, shooting at 1/64+ 2/3 power
Yongnuo YN 460 in hand, boomed overhead camera left, shooting at 1/8th power, fired through a mini-apollo softbox (8" wide)
custom white balance (basically set to flash)

this provided for extremely consistent shots in a darker nightclub setting.

I could also easily drag the shutter to give some more movement to the shots


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5W0L3
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Aug 13, 2012 09:35 |  #8

jackinavox wrote in post #14846879 (external link)
An easy approach i would suggest would be to set your flash to ETTL, pointed up with bounce card up (or use a diffuser), then expose for the ambient light (maybe iso 800, 1/30, f5.6). With that setting you should be able to get groups of people in focus and have the ambient light in the background. Play around with your FEC setting until ou get the desired look.

Hope that helps :)

1/30 shutter speed would be too low for me.. especially when using 85mm lens..


Manav
5D III x 2 (gripped) | 35L | 85L II | 100L | 24-70mm IIL | 70-200mm IIL | Some strobes & some speedlights.
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brokensocial
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Aug 13, 2012 09:36 |  #9

Those don't look inconsistent to me. Anyway, we don't fuss too much about that as long as exposures are coherent within scenes.


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nathancarter
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Aug 13, 2012 11:05 |  #10

When the ambient lighting is all sorts of wacky colors, don't try to force the skin tones to be "correct" and natural looking. In situations like this, I'll find some neutral reference to pick for white balance, see where it takes the sliders, then move the sliders halfway back to where they originally were. That cleans up the skin tones just a little bit while still allowing plenty of ambient feel.

If the composition is nice but the mixed light colors are just unbearable, do a B&W conversion. This helps a lot on severely underexposed shots, too.

Frankly, in difficult and changing lighting conditions, you'll probably have to touch each one by hand. As the lights vary in direction, color, and intensity, and as the subjects move nearer and farther from the lights, your exposures are probably going to be all over the place.

The three you posted look pretty good, save for the too-close crop on #2 and the too-near focus on #1. The colors and exposures look fine, because that's what the scene was actually like and that's what the partygoers will want to remember.


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davisphotos
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Aug 14, 2012 14:40 |  #11

With one flash on camera with a bounce card and two off camera flashes in opposite corners of the room, I manage to get pretty consistent exposures in manual mode. In post, I set a baseline that gets most of the images pretty close, and then individually adjust each image as needed.


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Is having inconsistency between your pictures normal?
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Weddings & Other Family Events Talk 
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