Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 21 Aug 2012 (Tuesday) 08:56
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Bells on hiking boots?

 
spotz04
Goldmember
Avatar
1,971 posts
Gallery: 4 photos
Likes: 30
Joined Mar 2010
Location: Local Yocal, USA
     
Aug 21, 2012 08:56 |  #1

Anyone do this while on their hikes as to scare away bears? I'm going to be in the Rocky Mountains this week shooting landscape pics and would like to avoid a confrontation of a startled bear if I draw near one who didn't see or hear me coming.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
Journeyingjon
Member
Avatar
128 posts
Joined Jun 2010
Location: Calgary, AB
     
Aug 21, 2012 08:58 |  #2

so-called bear-bells really only serve to irritate the others in your group. You'd be better off travelling in a group and making some noise than wearing bells.
http://www.calgaryjour​nalonline.ca …ear-bells-are-ineffective (external link)


www.jonathanneufeld.co​m (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ejenner
Goldmember
Avatar
3,806 posts
Gallery: 83 photos
Likes: 868
Joined Nov 2011
Location: Denver, CO
     
Aug 21, 2012 09:28 as a reply to  @ Journeyingjon's post |  #3

Dinner bells! They are great for letting bears know it is dinner time (I always thought it meant the bears were going to eat you, rather than your food).

We only have black bears, no grizzlies, so personally I wouldn't bother, but if you are by yourself and generally quiet then it couldn't hurt. I'd just attach to your pack and try to get a low-frequency one (high-pitched ones could drive you nuts). I agree that just making noise is better though, which should be easy if you are in a group.

Pepper spray might not be a bad idea if you are camping out. Personally I never bother, but a friend recently had an encounter with a bear in the dark that was trying to get into their family tent! It sounded like the pepper spray helped deter the bear, but personally i suspect they had something in the tent they shouldn't have had in the first place.


Edward Jenner
5DIV, M6, GX1 II, Sig15mm FE, 16-35 F4,TS-E 17, TS-E 24, M11-22, M18-150 ,24-105, T45 1.8VC, 70-200 f4 IS, 70-200 2.8 vII, Sig 85 1.4, 100L, 135L, 400DOII.
http://www.flickr.com/​photos/48305795@N03/ (external link)
https://www.facebook.c​om/edward.jenner.372/p​hotos (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Preeb
Goldmember
Avatar
2,600 posts
Gallery: 102 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 673
Joined Sep 2011
Location: Logan County, CO
     
Aug 21, 2012 09:39 |  #4

spotz04 wrote in post #14886434 (external link)
Anyone do this while on their hikes as to scare away bears? I'm going to be in the Rocky Mountains this week shooting landscape pics and would like to avoid a confrontation of a startled bear if I draw near one who didn't see or hear me coming.

I hiked for 40 years in the Rockies and never saw a bear bell, darn sure never wore one. Part of my reason for being there was to see wildlife, and wearing bells is a sure way to get the impression that the mountains are totally bereft of life. I've startled bears feeding on huckleberries in late summer and they are typically as scared as you are. If you make enough noise for them to hear you coming, you'll never even see one.


Rick
6D Mark II - EF 17-40 f4 L -- EF 100mm f2.8 L IS Macro -- EF 70-200 f4 L IS w/1.4 II TC

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
spotz04
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
1,971 posts
Gallery: 4 photos
Likes: 30
Joined Mar 2010
Location: Local Yocal, USA
     
Aug 21, 2012 10:09 as a reply to  @ Preeb's post |  #5

Journeyingjon - thanks for the article! I suppose I can see how wildlife would become use to hearing the bell sounds.

I read the stories and comments posted on POTN but I just curious about the bells idea.

There will be only two of us doing day (no camping) hikes with at least one starting out in the middle of the night. This is the first time I'm going into black bear country so I'm trying to be prepared for that "you never know!" situation.

I had bought a big can of bear spray at Cabelas to take with me as a precaution, but then I find out later the rules say it can not go checked bag on an airplane. There's a Bass Pro in Denver that I'll probably stop in to see if they carry the 30' spray cans with the belt clip. If I don't have to use it on the trail then I have no problem spending $40 anyway for it even if I can't take it home on a plane. I think my life is worth at least that much. :D




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
PineyWoodsPhoto
Mostly Lurking
Avatar
13 posts
Joined Apr 2012
Location: Box Springs, GA
     
Aug 21, 2012 10:21 |  #6

You would be well served to properly prepare yourself, if a bear attack is a legitimate concern. This item can be easily placed into your pocket, out of sight of anyone, unless and until you had to use it.

http://www.genitron.co​m …Handgun-Detail.asp?ID=222 (external link)




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
stsva
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
6,360 posts
Gallery: 45 photos
Likes: 285
Joined Mar 2009
Location: Northern Virginia
     
Aug 21, 2012 10:29 |  #7

This will tell you everything you need to know:
http://www.boyscouttra​il.com …e/watch_for_bea​rs-606.asp (external link)


Some Canon stuff and a little bit of Yongnuo.
http://www.pbase.com/s​tsva/profile (external link)
Member of the GIYF
Club and
HAMSTTR
٩ Breeders Club https://photography-on-the.net …=744235&highlig​ht=hamsttr Join today!
Image Editing OK

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
stsva
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
6,360 posts
Gallery: 45 photos
Likes: 285
Joined Mar 2009
Location: Northern Virginia
     
Aug 21, 2012 10:31 |  #8

PineyWoodsPhoto wrote in post #14886831 (external link)
You would be well served to properly prepare yourself, if a bear attack is a legitimate concern. This item can be easily placed into your pocket, out of sight of anyone, unless and until you had to use it.

http://www.genitron.co​m …Handgun-Detail.asp?ID=222 (external link)

You'd need to be aware of local concealed carry laws. Plus, that thing would be really brutal to fire. If allowed by local law, personally I'd go with a regular high-velocity firearm rather than something like that.


Some Canon stuff and a little bit of Yongnuo.
http://www.pbase.com/s​tsva/profile (external link)
Member of the GIYF
Club and
HAMSTTR
٩ Breeders Club https://photography-on-the.net …=744235&highlig​ht=hamsttr Join today!
Image Editing OK

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
scobols
Goldmember
Avatar
1,309 posts
Gallery: 119 photos
Likes: 531
Joined Dec 2006
Location: Waconia, MN
     
Aug 21, 2012 10:38 |  #9

It is also a good idea to keep an eye out for fresh bear scat so you have an idea if bears are in the area. People should be able to recognize the difference between black bear and grizzly bear scat.
Black bear droppings are smaller and often contain berries, leaves, and possibly bits of fur. Grizzly bear droppings tend to contain small bells and smell of pepper.


www.scottbolster.com (external link)
facebook (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ssim
POTN Landscape & Cityscape Photographer 2005
Avatar
10,884 posts
Likes: 5
Joined Apr 2003
Location: southern Alberta, Canada
     
Aug 21, 2012 10:47 as a reply to  @ stsva's post |  #10

I live less than an hour from the Rockies and its not hard to see a bear (grizzly or otherwise) but rarely close up. I've hiked and photographed in these mountains for 30 years and have yet to have a close encounter of the bear kind where I felt threatened. Now I prefer to shoot wildlife and the bell thing is totally counter intuitive to making that venture successful. Quite honestly they are as scared of us as we are of them. I've been close to Grizzlies in the past (30 yards or so) and they just kept moving away making trying to get the shot difficult. This one even had a cub with her. I do pack a canister of pepper spray when walking in the mountains. I carry a whistle around my neck which serves the purposes of you can blow it if you see that bear that you don't want to and you can blow on it if you fall and get injured.

If you are primarily shooting landscapes you will probably be at vantage points that are out in the open so that you can actually see that landscape. Educating yourself on safe hiking practices will go a long way to making sure that you return home safe and sound. If you see alot of berries around that are ripe then you could see a bear but they are focused on the berries not you. I have ran across some people that had a medium sized bell tied to the belt of one of the party members. I quite honestly found it annoying as did many others. It is your right to wear it if you want but I think there are better ways of minimizing the risk to your self without irritating others on the trails.

Good luck on getting the shots you want. The Rockies are generally a safe place to shoot and one of my favorite places to go hide out.


My life is like one big RAW file....way too much post processing needed.
Sheldon Simpson | My Gallery (external link) | My Gear updated: 20JUL12

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
mattkrass
Member
184 posts
Joined Aug 2010
Location: NY
     
Aug 21, 2012 11:20 as a reply to  @ ssim's post |  #11

You know, this thread explains a lot....

A year ago I was hiking with friends and we came across a few bears, we couldn't figure out for the life of us why the bears mid-regions seemed to be jingling ;)

Come to think of it, they did seem rather content, and not hungry at all....


Matt Krass
Design Engineering Nerd | Canon EOS 6D | Canon EOS Rebel T2i | 24-105mm f/4L | 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 | 75-300mm f/4-5.6 | 'Nifty' 50mm II f/1.8

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Luckless
Goldmember
3,064 posts
Likes: 187
Joined Mar 2012
Location: PEI, Canada
     
Aug 21, 2012 12:38 |  #12

I'll be honest, I'm more scared of a bull moose than I am of a bear. And most scared of skunks. Damn things will spray at the drop of a hat. Seriously, I had one of my hats hanging in a tree to dry once, and the wind knocked it down, scared a skunk, and I ended up just leaving that hat there. It was a nice hat too.

Be smart, keep alert. You are not natural prey for most animals, and in general most will try to avoid you.


Canon EOS 7D | EF 28 f/1.8 | EF 85 f/1.8 | EF 70-200 f/4L | EF-S 17-55 | Sigma 150-500
Flickr: Real-Luckless (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Journeyingjon
Member
Avatar
128 posts
Joined Jun 2010
Location: Calgary, AB
     
Aug 21, 2012 12:55 |  #13

ssim wrote in post #14886949 (external link)
I live less than an hour from the Rockies and its not hard to see a bear (grizzly or otherwise) but rarely close up. I've hiked and photographed in these mountains for 30 years and have yet to have a close encounter of the bear kind where I felt threatened. Now I prefer to shoot wildlife and the bell thing is totally counter intuitive to making that venture successful. Quite honestly they are as scared of us as we are of them. I've been close to Grizzlies in the past (30 yards or so) and they just kept moving away making trying to get the shot difficult. This one even had a cub with her. I do pack a canister of pepper spray when walking in the mountains. I carry a whistle around my neck which serves the purposes of you can blow it if you see that bear that you don't want to and you can blow on it if you fall and get injured.

If you are primarily shooting landscapes you will probably be at vantage points that are out in the open so that you can actually see that landscape. Educating yourself on safe hiking practices will go a long way to making sure that you return home safe and sound. If you see alot of berries around that are ripe then you could see a bear but they are focused on the berries not you. I have ran across some people that had a medium sized bell tied to the belt of one of the party members. I quite honestly found it annoying as did many others. It is your right to wear it if you want but I think there are better ways of minimizing the risk to your self without irritating others on the trails.

Good luck on getting the shots you want. The Rockies are generally a safe place to shoot and one of my favorite places to go hide out.

ssim makes some great points. I live in the same area and have spent hundreds of hours in the mountains with only a few bear encounters. I was even charged once (external link) and that shared the **** out of me! As he, and the others, have said: a little education goes a long way.


www.jonathanneufeld.co​m (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ejenner
Goldmember
Avatar
3,806 posts
Gallery: 83 photos
Likes: 868
Joined Nov 2011
Location: Denver, CO
     
Aug 21, 2012 18:06 |  #14

PineyWoodsPhoto wrote in post #14886831 (external link)
You would be well served to properly prepare yourself, if a bear attack is a legitimate concern. This item can be easily placed into your pocket, out of sight of anyone, unless and until you had to use it.

http://www.genitron.co​m …Handgun-Detail.asp?ID=222 (external link)

I don't think I've ever been as rude as I want to be by this post. I hope you were completely joking.

In any case this would not be a good anti-bear 'device'.


Guy arrives in Alaska, goes into a gun store,

Visitor: OK, I'm going out hiking, I need the biggest handgun you got to protect myself from bears
Shop owner: Ohh, that would be a .44 magnum
Visitor: Perfect!
Shop owner: And would you like me to file down the front sight for you?
Visitor: Why would I want you to do that?
Shop owner: It makes it much easier to get it out of your ass after the bear shoves it up there.

In all seriousness though, problem bears in Alaska that are eventually captured or killed often have dozens of rounds of various caliber bullets in them, from handgun to rifle rounds. If you're going to try to shoot a bear, you'd better know what you are doing. Much better if you have a bear encounter to figure you what the bear is trying to tell you and/or why he/she is reacting the way they are than going straight into 'shoot them' or even pepper spray mode.

I've also been charged by a Grizzly (not in CO) and still would 'never' (or at least have not yet) take pepper spray or a gun to protect myself (except for Polar Bears, I would if wandering the north slope). Listen to ssim, he knows what he is talking about.

But if you encounter a raccoon, be cautious! I'm serious.


Edward Jenner
5DIV, M6, GX1 II, Sig15mm FE, 16-35 F4,TS-E 17, TS-E 24, M11-22, M18-150 ,24-105, T45 1.8VC, 70-200 f4 IS, 70-200 2.8 vII, Sig 85 1.4, 100L, 135L, 400DOII.
http://www.flickr.com/​photos/48305795@N03/ (external link)
https://www.facebook.c​om/edward.jenner.372/p​hotos (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ejenner
Goldmember
Avatar
3,806 posts
Gallery: 83 photos
Likes: 868
Joined Nov 2011
Location: Denver, CO
     
Aug 21, 2012 18:20 |  #15

scobols wrote in post #14886914 (external link)
Black bear droppings are smaller and often contain berries, leaves, and possibly bits of fur. Grizzly bear droppings tend to contain small bells and smell of pepper.

Exactly!


Edward Jenner
5DIV, M6, GX1 II, Sig15mm FE, 16-35 F4,TS-E 17, TS-E 24, M11-22, M18-150 ,24-105, T45 1.8VC, 70-200 f4 IS, 70-200 2.8 vII, Sig 85 1.4, 100L, 135L, 400DOII.
http://www.flickr.com/​photos/48305795@N03/ (external link)
https://www.facebook.c​om/edward.jenner.372/p​hotos (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

5,567 views & 0 likes for this thread
Bells on hiking boots?
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is sdc123
788 guests, 360 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.