Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 20 Aug 2012 (Monday) 14:40
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Making it a crime to photograph minors

 
moose10101
registered smartass
1,773 posts
Gallery: 11 photos
Likes: 319
Joined May 2010
Location: Maryland, USA
     
Aug 22, 2012 09:18 |  #76

mikeinctown wrote in post #14891069 (external link)
No, he wouldn't be forced to leave, because nobody in their right mind would be dumb enough to go somewhere with him to "sort things out". And it is perfectly within my right to blow you off, the other parents, or even the cops for that matter since they have absolutely no probable cause to do anything with me, let alone search my gear, person, or residence, or even make me answer a singe question.

I believe Noitca was saying that he/she would take his/her business elsewhere, not that they would try to force the possible stalker to leave.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
mikeinctown
Goldmember
2,119 posts
Likes: 235
Joined May 2012
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
     
Aug 22, 2012 09:57 |  #77

moose10101 wrote in post #14891448 (external link)
I believe Noitca was saying that he/she would take his/her business elsewhere, not that they would try to force the possible stalker to leave.

My apologies then for the misread. Based on what I interpreted he mentioned a confrontation, going to authorituies and then if he didn't like the outcome "we would go elsewhere", which I took to mean the two parties. (instead of he and his son/family)

I still have to wonder, if your child is fully clothed, and you are in a public place, why would it matter if someone was taking photos? it is their legal right to do so. Their legal rights do not end simply because one might be concerned or overprotective, or even if they do not like the composition of the photos.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
stsva
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
6,363 posts
Gallery: 45 photos
Likes: 285
Joined Mar 2009
Location: Northern Virginia
     
Aug 22, 2012 10:14 |  #78

I think Buffalo Springfield may have said it best, quite some time ago:

Paranoia strikes deep
Into your life it will creep
It starts when you're always afraid
You step out of line, the man come and take you away


Some Canon stuff and a little bit of Yongnuo.
Member of the GIYF
Club and
HAMSTTR
٩ Breeders Club https://photography-on-the.net …=744235&highlig​ht=hamsttr Join today!
Image Editing OK

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
kfreels
Goldmember
Avatar
4,297 posts
Likes: 8
Joined Aug 2010
Location: Princeton, IN
     
Aug 23, 2012 14:23 |  #79

onona wrote in post #14884481 (external link)
The hysterical obsession with paedophilia, which is at the heart of attempted legislation like this, has really gone far beyond the point of reason. Why is it that adults, especially men, can't look at kids these days without being viewed with suspicion? While children, and indeed people of all ages, should obviously be awarded a reasonable degree of privacy, the notion that a child's appearance in a photo should be criminalised is batsh!t insane.

Modern day witch-hunting. There always has to be some witches to burn!
I was recently at Six flags with my teen daughters and took shots of them while they were on the roller coasters. Later a security guard approached me and said that someone reported to them that a guy matching my description has been taking pictures of children. Of course I said "darned right I am. They are my children." It was rather irritating that something as simple as taking photos now produces paranoia.


I am serious....and don't call me Shirley.
Canon 7D and a bunch of other stuff

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
RTPVid
Goldmember
3,365 posts
Likes: 3
Joined Aug 2010
Location: MN
     
Aug 23, 2012 14:29 |  #80

kfreels wrote in post #14897322 (external link)
Modern day witch-hunting. There always has to be some witches to burn!
I was recently at Six flags with my teen daughters and took shots of them while they were on the roller coasters. Later a security guard approached me and said that someone reported to them that a guy matching my description has been taking pictures of children. Of course I said "darned right I am. They are my children." It was rather irritating that something as simple as taking photos now produces paranoia.

The fact that you were wearing a trench coat had nothing to do with it, of course! :lol:


Tom

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
kfreels
Goldmember
Avatar
4,297 posts
Likes: 8
Joined Aug 2010
Location: Princeton, IN
     
Aug 23, 2012 14:32 |  #81

gjl711 wrote in post #14888055 (external link)
But it is a public place and it is none of your business. So in guessing that you are clearly on the side that all photography of kids should be regulated, at least by you even if those kids are in a public arena.

Of course what sense does it make to police photography in the first place? There are cameras everywhere photographing your child. If you don't want them photographed, you need to keep them home.

Same goes for women in swimsuits at the beach. How can one walk around in a thong at a public beach and then claim that they have a reasonable expectation of privacy? It's like a running joke but it's really not funny.


I am serious....and don't call me Shirley.
Canon 7D and a bunch of other stuff

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
gjl711
"spouting off stupid things"
Avatar
56,777 posts
Likes: 3425
Joined Aug 2006
Location: Deep in the heart of Texas
     
Aug 23, 2012 15:11 |  #82

kfreels wrote in post #14897365 (external link)
Of course what sense does it make to police photography in the first place? There are cameras everywhere photographing your child. If you don't want them photographed, you need to keep them home.

Same goes for women in swimsuits at the beach. How can one walk around in a thong at a public beach and then claim that they have a reasonable expectation of privacy? It's like a running joke but it's really not funny.

Exactly. If you do not want to be photographed in public, then stay at home where you do have a reasonable expectation of privacy. Outside if you can see it with your eyes, then you should be able to photograph it.


Not sure why, but call me JJ.
I used to hate math but then I realised decimals have a point.
.
::Flickr:: (external link)
::Gear::

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
kfreels
Goldmember
Avatar
4,297 posts
Likes: 8
Joined Aug 2010
Location: Princeton, IN
     
Aug 23, 2012 15:19 |  #83

RTPVid wrote in post #14897349 (external link)
The fact that you were wearing a trench coat had nothing to do with it, of course! :lol:

Wait. What? How did you know?


I am serious....and don't call me Shirley.
Canon 7D and a bunch of other stuff

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Miki ­ G
Goldmember
1,167 posts
Likes: 352
Joined Feb 2011
Location: Ireland
     
Aug 23, 2012 17:22 |  #84

Recently, the local authorities here brought out a bye law stating that photography was prohibited in the playground area of the public park (privately owned). CCTV was installed in the area too. I can understand where they were coming from when they decided on this, but it won't work. Parents have the right to photograph their children at play & if another child happens to be included in the background shouldn't prohibit the parent from keeping the photograph. There is just too much paranoia around relating to peadophiles, terrorists etc. I found it ironic that in this particular case, the CCTV cameras were placed in the play area, (which incidently could be operated by a pervert), but no cameras were placed near the public toilets where there are numerous recorded cases of kids being approached by adults.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
alazgr8
Member
Avatar
233 posts
Joined Apr 2012
Location: Orange County, CA.
     
Aug 23, 2012 19:50 |  #85

A few years ago my wife and I were in NYC, at a mall, and I was sitting in the food court area near the escalators reading a book while my wife was shopping. I noticed a guy sitting alone, with a bag on his table. He was acting in a very suspicious manner, always looking over his shoulder, and looking around, and he kept touching something inside his bag and looking inside the bag. I became curious, and got up from my table, and walked past him from behind close enough that that I could see what he was doing. The guy had a video camera, and he was looking in his view finder and he was videoing up womens and girls skirts. Rather than confront him, I went to security and told them what I observed, and pointed the man out, then I went back to my table. I saw more security show up, and start to observe him. After awhile, the police showed up, and talked to security, and then they went to talk to the man. They made him take the camera out of the bag, and play back some video for them. After talking awhile, they ley the man leave. I went over to the cops and told them I had alerted security to this guy, and why had they let the man go. The police said unless someone who had been video'd complained, there was no law against doing what the man was doing in NYC, and nothing they could do. I would have been very angry if I had caught him videoing my wife or grandchildren like that.

Regards,

Rick


Rick S.
My Gear = Canon 50d ~ EF 100 f/2.8L IS USM Macro ~ EF 100-400 f/4.5-5.6L IS USM ~ EF-S 17-55 IS USM f/2.8 IS ~ EF 70-300 f/4-5.6 IS USM ~ EF 28-135 IS f/3.5-5.6 IS USM

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
AvailableLight
Goldmember
1,208 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Mar 2012
Location: Chesapeake, VA
     
Aug 23, 2012 21:17 |  #86

alazgr8 wrote in post #14898647 (external link)
A few years ago my wife and I were in NYC, at a mall, and I was sitting in the food court area near the escalators reading a book while my wife was shopping. I noticed a guy sitting alone, with a bag on his table. He was acting in a very suspicious manner, always looking over his shoulder, and looking around, and he kept touching something inside his bag and looking inside the bag. I became curious, and got up from my table, and walked past him from behind close enough that that I could see what he was doing. The guy had a video camera, and he was looking in his view finder and he was videoing up womens and girls skirts. Rather than confront him, I went to security and told them what I observed, and pointed the man out, then I went back to my table. I saw more security show up, and start to observe him. After awhile, the police showed up, and talked to security, and then they went to talk to the man. They made him take the camera out of the bag, and play back some video for them. After talking awhile, they ley the man leave. I went over to the cops and told them I had alerted security to this guy, and why had they let the man go. The police said unless someone who had been video'd complained, there was no law against doing what the man was doing in NYC, and nothing they could do. I would have been very angry if I had caught him videoing my wife or grandchildren like that.

Regards,

Rick

Yeah those upskirt pervs don't help our cause.


AJ
Rebel T3i (600D)
18-55 | 55-250 | 50 1.8 | 60 2.8 macro | 15-85 | 430 EXII

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
RDKirk
Adorama says I'm "packed."
Avatar
14,108 posts
Gallery: 3 photos
Likes: 1214
Joined May 2004
Location: USA
     
Aug 23, 2012 21:45 |  #87

AvailableLight wrote in post #14899001 (external link)
Yeah those upskirt pervs don't help our cause.

Well, NYC has to get hip. Most women consider the space under their skirts as having an expectation of privacy. I suspect a female cop would have had a different interpretation of the situation: "Oh, dear, did I accidentally drop your camera? Oh, dear, and did I accidentally step on it too?"


TANSTAAFL--The Only Unbreakable Rule in Photography

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Luckless
Goldmember
3,064 posts
Likes: 189
Joined Mar 2012
Location: PEI, Canada
     
Aug 24, 2012 08:48 |  #88

RDKirk wrote in post #14899133 (external link)
Well, NYC has to get hip. Most women consider the space under their skirts as having an expectation of privacy. I suspect a female cop would have had a different interpretation of the situation: "Oh, dear, did I accidentally drop your camera? Oh, dear, and did I accidentally step on it too?"

And people say the stereotype of women often being butterfingers is such a bad thing. Sounds like it could really come in handy from time to time.


Canon EOS 7D | EF 28 f/1.8 | EF 85 f/1.8 | EF 70-200 f/4L | EF-S 17-55 | Sigma 150-500
Flickr: Real-Luckless (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
AvailableLight
Goldmember
1,208 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Mar 2012
Location: Chesapeake, VA
     
Aug 24, 2012 12:38 |  #89

RDKirk wrote in post #14899133 (external link)
Well, NYC has to get hip. Most women consider the space under their skirts as having an expectation of privacy. I suspect a female cop would have had a different interpretation of the situation: "Oh, dear, did I accidentally drop your camera? Oh, dear, and did I accidentally step on it too?"

Yeah I was actually a bit surprised that the guy was let go. Maybe he should've waived one of the women video'd over and said: "Excuse me, ma'am. This guy has recorded a video zooming between your legs. Are you ok with this?"


AJ
Rebel T3i (600D)
18-55 | 55-250 | 50 1.8 | 60 2.8 macro | 15-85 | 430 EXII

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Dan ­ Marchant
Do people actually believe in the Title Fairy?
Avatar
5,625 posts
Gallery: 19 photos
Likes: 2049
Joined Oct 2011
Location: Where I'm from is unimportant, it's where I'm going that counts.
     
Aug 24, 2012 23:39 |  #90

alazgr8 wrote in post #14898647 (external link)
The police said unless someone who had been video'd complained, there was no law against doing what the man was doing in NYC, and nothing they could do.

This is silly. How is a person who is being secretly filmed supposed to know to complain? This is exactly the time when police should be making use of wiretap laws to prevent secret filming, instead of those states misusing such laws to stop someone who isn't secretly filming from taping the Police.


Dan Marchant
Website/blog: danmarchant.com (external link)
Instagram: @dan_marchant (external link)
Gear Canon 5DIII + Fuji X-T2 + lenses + a plastic widget I found in the camera box.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

12,993 views & 0 likes for this thread
Making it a crime to photograph minors
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is vinny
642 guests, 147 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.