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Thread started 23 Aug 2012 (Thursday) 16:43
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Difference between Jpeg modes

 
metheone
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Aug 23, 2012 16:43 |  #1

Hi

First of all, a hello from me as a newbie!

I have recently jumped from a canon 350d to a 7d and am choosing my quality

I shoot a lot of photos in a project and therefore want to stay away from RAW if possible

What is the difference between the 2 JPEG L size? They are both 5184x3456 but a difference of 480 photos out of a 4gb card?

Thanks!




  
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Jim_T
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Aug 23, 2012 17:30 |  #2

In uncompressed 8 bit format, your 5184 X 3456 pictures will be around 53 Megabits per image.... That's how much information you need to make a 5184X3456 color picture.

JPEG can drastically reduce the memory size of an image through compression. The more compression, the smaller the image.. So your smaller images are just compressed more.




  
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metheone
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Aug 23, 2012 17:52 |  #3

Thanks very much for the quick reply!

So, am i jeopardising my self much by going for the more compressed (jagged) setting. I adjust photos in aperture on Mac




  
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Jim_T
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Aug 23, 2012 18:01 |  #4

Well.. In a way..

The algorithm JPEG uses is what is known as 'Lossy' compression... Subtle color differences are discarded in the compression process. The more compression, the more loss is sustained. If you compress too far, then you get splotches and various forms of artifacts..

Canon's compression levels yield reasonable results without obvious defects.. . But if you must shoot JPG, the 'large fine' option is the best.




  
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Aug 23, 2012 19:43 |  #5

Jim_T wrote in post #14898283 (external link)
Well.. In a way..

The algorithm JPEG uses is what is known as 'Lossy' compression... Subtle color differences are discarded in the compression process. The more compression, the more loss is sustained. If you compress too far, then you get splotches and various forms of artifacts..

Canon's compression levels yield reasonable results without obvious defects.. . But if you must shoot JPG, the 'large fine' option is the best.

JPG data compression at its worst (far, far worse than your camera would ever do!)...

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Aug 23, 2012 20:49 |  #6

At a very, very minimum, I would shoot large fine JPG. Cards are cheap these days, I suggest getting a larger card, at least an 8gb. I shoot LRaw + LJPG, and work all the JPGs. If I find one bad, I can rework the raw to provide a better JPG.

If you shoot any JPG option lower than the large fine, you are greatly reducing any chance of correcting images later with really good results.


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Aug 23, 2012 21:47 as a reply to  @ TeamSpeed's post |  #7

If you are going to process all photos on a computer, and have time to do that, you can use RAW only. If you are in a rush, then maybe RAW + jpeg make sense.

When I shoot a lot of sports pictures, I aim for publishing a few of them on the web, and that's pretty much the quality demand I have then. That's equivalent to 2 megapixels. So I shoot 18 megapixel jpegs but no RAW at such events.

The only time I use the lower qualities and sizes is when I shoot something I know I'm going to e-mail the next moment. Then I may go down to the lowest quality and size my 7D has. Sometimes I store a L jpeg fine on the CF card and create a S jpeg normal on a USB stick in the WFT-E5 at the same time. Then just put the stick in a computer and send it from there.

A couple of 32 GB cards will keep you running for a long time, and these cards are of reasonable cost nowadays.


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TSchrief
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Aug 24, 2012 01:52 |  #8
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Memory is cheap. Buy a few cards. I shoot large-fine jpg in good light when I can get away with ISO 800 or less. In garbage light, or ISO 1600 and up, I shoot raw+large fine jpg, just in case I need/want to work with a photo. If not, I just trash the .cr2 files. Raw is invaluable, if you need to make adjustments to your photos. Oh, did I mention that memory is cheap. Buy a few cards. Then shoot the highest resolution your camera has. You can always down-size and convert to jpg. You will never be able to take a shot on small-normal-jpg and later retrieve the raw data.


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BLOWNCO
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Aug 24, 2012 04:42 |  #9

metheone wrote in post #14898016 (external link)
Hi
I shoot a lot of photos in a project and therefore want to stay away from RAW if possible

I hate this excuse for when people say that cant shoot RAW or want to stay away from RAW maybe you should think about the shot more then trying to capture so many. Im not bashing you OP i was once in the same boat i shot jpeg only as a fear of space when shooting RAW but once i finally made the jump to RAW only it made me think about what i was shooting more. Just like the others have said buy a few cards don't be afraid of the all mighty RAW file. Just my $0.02


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melcat
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Aug 24, 2012 05:13 |  #10

Ham-fisted raw processing can produce results much worse than in-camera raw processing would.

There are two separate things (i) resolution, and (ii) quality. You would choose a lower resolution, for example, when emailing the image or shooting for the web. The quality setting determines how much of the colour and high spatial frequency information is thrown away. At high settings (like Canon's "fine") the loss is undetectable by most people; low settings belong more to an era when bandwidth and storage was dearer (the algorithm is old, outmoded technically, and originally designed for space vehicles).

Shooting JPEG *will* avoid having to push the images through a raw converter. I do it, for example, if I don't want to move the images through the machine with Photoshop on it; there *is* a raw converter supplied by Apple on a vanilla Mac but I can't be bothered learning it.




  
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Aug 24, 2012 09:52 as a reply to  @ melcat's post |  #11

I shoot mostly jpeg so I can pass on some of my experience. First get a larger card. Be sure to get a fast card. It really helps when you go to download pictures. Shoot large jpeg unless you need to go directly from the camera to e-mail or the web. Learn to adjust your pictures using the tone curve and level adjustments. Auto on Zoombrowser just isn't very good. Crop your pictures for content unless you are really good at composition. Lightness and contrast may need to be different for printing vs viewing on the PC. Experiment with sharpness and noise controls in DPP or Zoombrowser to see what effect they have on your images. This is where you can make images really pop and besides it is fun. Yes the Canon programs limit what you can do with jpeg images but there are other programs, some free, that are more versatile.

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metheone
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Aug 24, 2012 15:49 |  #12

Thanks for all the replies guys,

I am thinking that as many have said, i am going to start shooting raw and jpeg and the reasons you have stated make sense!

I feel a nice 32Gb card on its way :)

Thanks!




  
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Aug 24, 2012 17:03 |  #13

Shoot RAW, End of story.


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Nightstalker
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Aug 24, 2012 17:17 |  #14

DJHaze596 wrote in post #14902457 (external link)
Shoot RAW, End of story.

Oh come on, the OP has said he wants to avoid RAW so why make t his comment? RAW is not needed for everything and, depending on what you need the images for, just adds an unnecessary step into the ppost processing workflow.

I shoot RAW for weddings and corporate work but use jpg for stuff destined for the web alone.


  
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Aug 24, 2012 17:20 |  #15

DJHaze596 wrote in post #14902457 (external link)
Shoot RAW, End of story.

Yeah. Hardcore. Woo.


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Difference between Jpeg modes
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