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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 25 Aug 2012 (Saturday) 21:51
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Photographer/hiker killed by Grizzly. Sad

 
pmack
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Aug 26, 2012 09:23 |  #16

RTPVid wrote in post #14908160 (external link)
It is the attitude evidenced by these comments that I find tragic, indeed.

Got to love the irony... but i hear ya none the less.
Must be vegitarians


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Nature ­ Nut
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Aug 26, 2012 09:56 |  #17

pmack wrote in post #14908216 (external link)
Got to love the irony... but i hear ya none the less.
Must be vegitarians

I think it is more that they sympathize for the loss of two individuals, one of which was only doing what it does instinctively. It is unfortunate that a wild animal has to be killed because a hiker wasn't acting responsibly. Unfortunately there is a greater anthropocentric ideology than biocentric compassion when wildlife related incidents occur. For all we know the bear was startled by the photographer, or maybe just not a Nikon fan.


Adam - Upstate NY:

  
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Tedder
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Aug 26, 2012 12:18 |  #18

>>>"...He came within 50 yards of the bear, far closer than the quarter-mile of separation required by park rules...."

To abide by this rule, however, a hiker would have to know the location of all bears at all times in relation to himself.

In anything other than open country, a hiker can easily round a bend in the trail and come upon a bear that is less than 150 feet away. In fact, to even know that a bear is present you'd usually have to be CLOSER than that.



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TooManyShots
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Aug 26, 2012 12:34 |  #19
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Why they killed the Bear when this man could be acting irresponsibility in the first place. He is hiker and he probably couldn't have the focal length to capture the bear at a safe distance....


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Tedder
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Aug 26, 2012 12:48 |  #20

Nature Nut wrote in post #14908335 (external link)
I think it is more that they sympathize for the loss of two individuals, one of which was only doing what it does instinctively. It is unfortunate that a wild animal has to be killed because a hiker wasn't acting responsibly. Unfortunately there is a greater anthropocentric ideology than biocentric compassion when wildlife related incidents occur. For all we know the bear was startled by the photographer, or maybe just not a Nikon fan.


Thankfully, my ideology is not anthropocentric and my compassion is not biocentric. I sympathize with the man, with the bear, and also with the grub that the bear had just eaten before it killed the man.



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Nature ­ Nut
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Aug 26, 2012 12:49 |  #21

Tedder wrote in post #14908873 (external link)
>>>"...He came within 50 yards of the bear, far closer than the quarter-mile of separation required by park rules...."

To abide by this rule, however, a hiker would have to know the location of all bears at all times in relation to himself.

In anything other than open country, a hiker can easily round a bend in the trail and come upon a bear that is less than 150 feet away. In fact, to even know that a bear is present you'd usually have to be CLOSER than that.

The rules are for approaching wildlife, but in many cases like you said, people encounter bears around bends or thick forests at close distances. Regardless of the distance the person should have been carrying some sort of suitable protection they know how to use. There's no safety net, especially in the larger parks.


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Nature ­ Nut
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Aug 26, 2012 12:53 |  #22

Tedder wrote in post #14908959 (external link)
Thankfully, my ideology is not anthropocentric and my compassion is not biocentric. I sympathize with the man, with the bear, and also with the grub that the bear had just eaten before it killed the man.

Thats biocentric in a nutshell ;) It ascertains the equal right of human life and non-human life forms to co-exist based on ecological value. But I get what you mean. :)


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pssc
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Aug 26, 2012 13:54 as a reply to  @ Nature Nut's post |  #23

We do not have all the facts. Either this person knew the bear was there and approached to within 50 yards, which is a recipe for disaster-- or he came across the bear and then decided to hang around for 8 minutes taking pictures. Either way, he made a fatal mistake. If he came upon the bear, he should have done his best to leave. When will people learn it isn't Disneyland out there. The only rule I know of is that wildlife is wild, dangerous and unpredictable. As a kid when I first started spending time in the great outdoors, I read everything and spoke to "experts." What I learned as I was in the woods, was that most of the experts and their info was wrong. Many so called bear experts have become part of the food chain, not with standing that they claim to know bear behavior etc. I have heard "experts" claim a bear will only attack when threatened. However, it is only the bear who will decide where that line in the sand is located. I do carry protection when in the woods or bush. But, one must practice and be prepared to use protection. A grizzly can move very fast. I have hunted and hiked and photographed critters for years and am willing to state that most people would not be able to deploy their protection quick enough in most cases. Hence, distance is always your friend if possible.
Here is an update:
http://www.adn.com …d-by-grizzly-bear-in.html (external link)

Cheers, Steve
PS: another "expert and his pepper spray" http://seattletimes.nw​source.com …ld/2001826694_b​ear31.html (external link)


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MikeFairbanks
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Aug 26, 2012 14:09 |  #24

Don't mess with the wildlife.

My dad picks these things up. I'm sure the bird thought, "They told me not to get too close, but I didn't listen. No dropped french fry is worth this."

My dad let it go a couple seconds later.

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LV ­ Moose
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Aug 26, 2012 14:21 as a reply to  @ MikeFairbanks's post |  #25

This is why I like shooting hummingbirds... not much chance of being eaten.


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5Dmaniac
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Aug 26, 2012 17:31 |  #26

Not sure any of you have ever hiked in Bear Country. My wife and I hiked extensively in Alaska and Glacier National Park where Bears run wild:-) The first rule is to make noise, so the bear knows you are coming. That works most of the time but NOT always.

This hiker might have done everything right and still he ran into a death trap. I wonder how many of us would not have stopped to take a few pictures, even though we were too close, esp. if the bear did not act aggressive at all. Bears can and will attack without any warning - most of the time these attacks are fake and they will stop right in front of you just to show you they could kill you if they wanted to.

The one cardinal mistake this guy made was not to be ready with bear spray for the attack.




  
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nicksan
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Aug 26, 2012 18:43 |  #27

RTPVid wrote in post #14908160 (external link)
It is the attitude evidenced by these comments that I find tragic, indeed.

pmack wrote in post #14908216 (external link)
Got to love the irony... but i hear ya none the less.
Must be vegitarians

Listen. I don't proclaim to be Mr. Animal Rights activist. I own two cats as pets. I love a good piece of steak, friend chicken, fish, etc. Most definitely not a vegetarian.

What I find tragic from you two is that you don't see the tragedy in the bear getting killed. Never have I discounted the human life that was lost. I said that was tragic. That goes without saying. Regardless of whether this man was disregarding the rules or not, none of us want to see someone die taking a photo of a bear.

But the fact remains, the bear was in its domain, minding his/ber business. In other words, just doing what it does. Enter human. Result = tragedy. Human life lost. Bear shot.

Just a f*cked up story that's all.




  
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Nature ­ Nut
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Aug 26, 2012 19:00 |  #28

5Dmaniac wrote in post #14909901 (external link)
I wonder how many of us would not have stopped to take a few pictures, even though we were too close, esp.

The one cardinal mistake this guy made was not to be ready with bear spray for the attack.

I think any nature enthusiast would. I have in many encounters taken photos or lingered nearby depends on whether I was hiking with or without my camera. The difference is being alert, educated, and prepared. As we have found out, this hiker was evidently none of the above. When I visited Yellowstone earlier this year people stood in front of a Black bear about 30 yds away heading their way with cubs so they could get a nice photograph. I call it natural selection in progress.


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RTPVid
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Aug 26, 2012 22:11 as a reply to  @ Nature Nut's post |  #29

nicksan wrote in post #14907094 (external link)
Looks like the guy was closer than the required distance to the bear. A very tragic tale especially when you consider they also shot the bear in question. All he was doing was living his/her life in the wild. Both human and animal were in the wrong place at the wrong time.

nicksan wrote in post #14910143 (external link)
...
What I find tragic from you two is that you don't see the tragedy in the bear getting killed.

Where could you possibly get that from what I posted?

nicksan wrote in post #14910143 (external link)
Never have I discounted the human life that was lost.

Yes, you did.

nicksan wrote in post #14907094 (external link)
...A very tragic tale especially when you consider they also shot the bear in question.


Tom

  
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tkbslc
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Aug 27, 2012 00:40 |  #30

"Especially" because two lives were lost, tragic tale because of the one. Get off your high horse.


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Photographer/hiker killed by Grizzly. Sad
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