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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 05 Mar 2012 (Monday) 19:16
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430 ex Guide # distance scale

 
MrScott
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Aug 29, 2012 22:14 |  #16

I thought you just tied knots in a string at 11', 8', 5.6', 4' or 2.8 feet. Then you would just tell the 6 year old to just go to the third knot and turn around, but DON'T pull on the damn string, just pretend.




  
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Wilt
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Aug 29, 2012 22:20 |  #17

MrScott wrote in post #14924564 (external link)
I thought you just tied knots in a string at 11', 8', 5.6', 4' or 2.8 feet. Then you would just tell the 6 year old to just go to the third knot and turn around, but DON'T pull on the damn string, just pretend.

That works well when the flash doesn't have a zoom head. Because of the zoom head, you have a headache keeping the 6 year old from ending up with a big knotted ball of all the different strings for the FL alternatives.


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Curtis ­ N
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Aug 29, 2012 22:57 |  #18

The calculations get complicated, not only because of the zooming head but also because of 1/3 stop ISO settings.

Thankfully, Canon gives us a distance scale on the back of the flash unit. It accounts for the aperture, ISO, flash zoom setting and (in manual flash mode) the flash power setting. You'll still need to compensate for the inflated guide numbers, but it gives you a benchmark that's easy to work with.


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Wilt
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Aug 29, 2012 23:36 |  #19

Curtis N wrote in post #14924710 (external link)
The calculations get complicated, not only because of the zooming head but also because of 1/3 stop ISO settings.

Given the vaguaries associated with ETTL, I rather doubt that 1/3 EV values for ISO will make all that much difference in overall accuracy, if you simply round to the nearest full EV! :lol: If there was better accuracy of the flash exposure system, it might matter; but since it isn't all that accurate, it does not matter.


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Curtis ­ N
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Aug 29, 2012 23:41 |  #20

That's true Wilt, but the inconsistency of E-TTL is a separate issue, I think.

In E-TTL mode you want to answer the question, "Does this flash have the juice to get the job done in this situation?"

In manual mode, you want to answer the question, "What's the correct power setting for this situation?" And the limitations of E-TTL are not an issue.


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Wilt
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Aug 29, 2012 23:47 |  #21

This digression begs the question...what percentage of POTN shooters bother to use intermediate ISO values (those values not 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, etc.) They seem to be artifacts left over from the film days, when emulsions were rated that finely to provide best possible performance with lowest evidence of grain and high possible ISO number because "ISO 160 film is 'better than' an ISO125 film" for film speed.


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Curtis ­ N
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Aug 30, 2012 02:30 |  #22

Well, since we're way off topic...
What I have read is that the intermediate ISO settings are akin to "low" and "high" ISO settings, in that they don't change how the voltage is amplified but rather they digitally adjust the voltage readings that are recorded. This is essentially the same as cranking the exposure of a RAW file up or down with software, and it effectively reduces the camera's dynamic range.

Hence, I don't use those settings and have my camera set to skip over them (fewer clicks to get to where I want). But judging by the EXIF data posted in many threads here, I'm guessing quite a few people use them.


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430 ex Guide # distance scale
FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
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