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Thread started 07 Sep 2012 (Friday) 14:04
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Art of photography...

 
Thorrulz
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Sep 09, 2012 08:31 |  #16

Hogloff wrote in post #14963526 (external link)
It's that easy is it. So if I want to shoot a wedding, I just need to review a few of the top wedding photogs websites and I am ready to go?

I don't think so.

Of course it's that easy. Just watch a Scott Kelby video and over at KelbyTraining and grab your "Gary Fong - Master of Wedding Photography" flash doo-dad and you're ready for any possible scenario that may arise during the shoot.;)


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My sister, the professional baker and cake decorator once told me that my camera takes great pics. My reply was that I thought her oven baked great cakes.:lol:

  
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triton3k
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Sep 09, 2012 10:42 |  #17

you can check out photomanhattan.com
they are located on 14th street near union square. My friend took their course there and he really liked it. I may end up taking one of their lighting classes.


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base_nine
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Sep 09, 2012 12:57 |  #18

OP - one of the best things you can do to learn the "art" is to take lots of photographs. Then be really critical - decide what you like or don't like about a particular photo. If you could go back and retake it, what would you do different? Don't just look at the subject, but also the background and the lighting. Sure, at first you may may end up with only a few good ones from the hundreds you've taken but over time, that will improve. Learn from your bad photos and try not to repeat mistakes.

A photography class will help you learn the techniques for taking good photographs and to develop that critical eye. I found that constructive criticism from the teachers and peers boosted my skills. Some other posters here have already suggested some very fine classes. If those are not convenient for you check your local community college. And there's also a whole host of free on-line classes on the internet if you don't want to spend money just yet.

Remember that every time you see that perfect photo from a pro, there were probably many not so perfect ones and comes as a result of many years of experience. And yes - maybe some post processing ;) The difference between those pros and an amateur like me is that their ratio of "print worthy" photos far exceeds mine. After all, they have to earn a living from this.

Keep at it and have fun. Even after 30+ years (starting with film), I still find that I'm learning things ... and hopefully improving :)


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Long time enthusiast - been photographing since my teens in the 80's.

  
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Lowner
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Sep 09, 2012 13:16 |  #19

yalemba,

I believe you are right to look for the artistic side of our hobby. Thats what makes the difference between a great image and a merely passable one. The technical side can be learnt as you go along.

And I completely agree with base_nine, we all produce mediocre stuff, but as a pro motorsports 'tog said to me years ago "no one sees my rubbish".


Richard

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jonneymendoza
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Sep 10, 2012 05:20 |  #20

Hogloff wrote in post #14963517 (external link)
Yeh, and you can teach yourself just about any skill reading and watching videos but taking a course and having interaction and feedback most likely will get you there much faster and provide a much better in-depth experience.

I learned my carpentry skills by reading and watching, but I don't fool myself into thinking I have the skills of someone who learned through proper classroom and hands on teaching.

My point is that u can teach yourself easily and spend the extra u saved on actually going out to take the shots.

It's not about learning the quickest way and even that is a opinion not a fact.there are many people like me who actually learned more when self teaching themselves .


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MotorPro
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Sep 10, 2012 08:23 as a reply to  @ jonneymendoza's post |  #21

The fact is that everyone is differant. Some people have a natural artistic eye,some can understand the technical aspects with no help. Some people learn from book,some learn from instructors.Many of the greatest artists in history went to art classes others were self taught. So do whatever you feel is best for you. You can never have to much knowledge.




  
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RDKirk
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Sep 10, 2012 08:47 |  #22

If you are serious about it as an art form ...
take it from art people and not photo people that

This is true, but not all the truth.

To a very great extent, art is art, and what the portrait greats learned centuries ago about the visual portrayal of the human face and form still applies today. I spend as much time studying painters as I do studying photographers--the rococo artists really had it going on, and my current work is exactly what Sargent was doing.

That said, there are still elements that are unique to photography, so there are things to learn in additon to what the "Old Masters" can teach us.

To a large extent, it's because of the uniqueness of the medium: The way the camera projects three dimensional objects onto a twh-dimensional surface. Just as a painter must take into account the inherent differences of the medium when switching from oil to watercolor, the photographic artist must take into account the inherent differences of the photographic medium.

In addition, there is a difference in how the audience views the different media. I was browsing a portrait painting forum a few weeks ago where they were discussing the fact that their markets valued oil portraits much more than watercolor portraits, despite the fact that watercolor takes no less skill than oil (and in some ways, more skill).

In a similar fashion, a portrait painter gets "points" from the audience just because the likeness is good ("Hey, it looks just like me!"). and more points if the proportions are adequate.

For the photographer, however, the audience starts with an expectation of accurate likeness and proportion, so the photographer gets no points for "Hey, it looks just like me." The photographer has to pay much more attention than the painter to other aspects of graphic imaging that the painter gets, to some extent, a "pass" on.

However...the great painters get it all right.


TANSTAAFL--The Only Unbreakable Rule in Photography

  
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Lowner
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Sep 10, 2012 09:09 |  #23

MotorPro wrote in post #14971150 (external link)
The fact is that everyone is differant. Some people have a natural artistic eye,some can understand the technical aspects with no help. Some people learn from book,some learn from instructors.Many of the greatest artists in history went to art classes others were self taught. So do whatever you feel is best for you. You can never have to much knowledge.

I'm certainly one of the latter. I find it next to impossible to understand and retain what I've read, yet once its been explained and I've been able to ask questions its there forever!

RDKirk has opened my eyes as well, my thanks for that. I have never considered using the old-masters as an example and will make a point of examining them in more critical detail in future. I do know that some older landscape oils and watercolours leave a lot to be desired but then we get Turners work that is amazing and can be easily related back to photography.


Richard

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yalemba
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Sep 10, 2012 13:11 |  #24

Folks, thanks so much for your helpful suggestions. Yes, I have read several photography books, reviewed instructional DVDs, and taken online courses (Kelby). At this point, I am seeking an advanced (graduate-level) class to get a broad overview on how great photographers "pre-visualize" (per Ansel), and transform their vision to prints. Thanks again...


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Flash: 600 EX with STE3, Einstein

  
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DreamMaker23
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Sep 10, 2012 13:39 |  #25

EL_PIC wrote in post #14961018 (external link)
Anyone can teach photo and anyone can learn photo.
Anyone can pay and profit from it.
Anyone can exploit it also.
If you are serious about it as an art form ...
take it from art people and not photo people that
you find in camera shops or photo forms or those who profit in courses.
If you cant learn photo on own ...
Ask your Moma what to do if you need help ..
http://www.moma.org/le​arn/courses/index (external link)

This!! Awesome bw!

triton3k wrote in post #14967637 (external link)
you can check out photomanhattan.com
they are located on 14th street near union square. My friend took their course there and he really liked it. I may end up taking one of their lighting classes.

Finally someone with the right answer. :D




  
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Pjay
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Sep 13, 2012 19:08 as a reply to  @ DreamMaker23's post |  #26

Three books I'd highly recommend:
Galen Rowell's 'Inner Game of Outdoor Photography' best book on previsualisation I've seen
Michael Freeman's 'The Photographer's Eye' and
Richard D. Zakia's 'Perception and Imaging'
I spent the first six months of last year doing full time study of photography, but have gained far more from these three books than six months in class...
Depends on your learning style and the quality of the instruction.

The other thing I'd recommend is joining a vibrant camera club. The Photographic Society of which I'm a member has awesome guest speakers, and a variety of accredited judges who teach so much by their perceptive critique of members' images, all for a mere $60 a year.


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yalemba
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Sep 13, 2012 22:05 |  #27

Pjay wrote in post #14987791 (external link)
Three books I'd highly recommend:
Galen Rowell's 'Inner Game of Outdoor Photography' best book on previsualisation I've seen
Michael Freeman's 'The Photographer's Eye' and
Richard D. Zakia's 'Perception and Imaging'.

Thanks. I just watched Jay Maisel's instructions on Kelby Training; he truly articulates what photography is all about. Let me order these books on Amazon now...Thanks again...


Cameras: 1DX, 1Ds Mark III
Lenses: 24 TSE II, 50L, 85L II, 24-70L II, 70-200L II
Flash: 600 EX with STE3, Einstein

  
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