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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 18 Sep 2012 (Tuesday) 19:19
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Lens for Delivery Room

 
JasonMK
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Sep 19, 2012 12:44 |  #16

Having been in the room for 3 C sections, I'd leave the 50mm at home. You'll definately need something more like the 18-55. You said tomorrow (is that today?). Otherwise, might be a good time to rent a lens. Something faster than the kit, but wider than the 50.


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Charlie
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Sep 19, 2012 13:06 |  #17

babies cant even see much, flash as you please, most shots will be posed anyhow. no camera when the csection in progress.


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EggWhiteS
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Sep 19, 2012 13:36 as a reply to  @ Charlie's post |  #18

This may be too late, but for other people that find this thread.

On a crop I agree with what people said, the 50mm will be too long. When my son was born and we had a c-section I was told where to stand and couldn't move from there and I wasn't allowed to use flash at all (which I hear is common for c-sections).

I used my 17-55 and had no issues. For a operating room they are normally well lit and there is usually a strong light right over the baby. So think of it as a very focused constant light source. If you are having a normal birth then you can probably use a flash (ask the doctor/nurse first) and those rooms are usually much darker then an operating room so you may need it. Also you are allowed to move around a lot more then you are with a c-section.


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ceriltheblade
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Sep 19, 2012 13:42 |  #19

MNUplander wrote in post #15014407 (external link)
Being a new dad twice in a little over a years time, I would have to say I have a differing opinion on this. If there is not a life threatening issue with the baby or momma I can honestly say my first concern is not whether or not the staff is annoyed by a flash. You guys might deliver babies every day but I will only be in that position a couple times in my life and Ill be taking pictures.

Sensibly bounced flashes have never disrupted my kids and if I waited for staff to leave to take pictures, I'd never get a picture taken. There is always one nurse or another coming in to check mom, baby or a machine at all hours of the day and night.

But, advice for the OP - don't get too hung up on bringing specialized gear. Enjoy the moment - our second baby was delivered within moments of getting to the hospital and Id have missed the entire delivery if I went out to get my camera from the trunk. It's good to have pictures, but remember to enjoy the moment.

it was probably wrong for me to say something where your expertise of two deliveries in approx 1 year;s time is so impressive

- but allow me to interject something -

the OP mentioned that he had a scheduled c-section. before you encourage him not worry about the staff and their jobs that they are doing both for his wife and his new addition, did you ever think to yourself - WHY the person is undergoing a csection in the first place? Maybe your experience can be different than the OPs? Are there any medical considerations in play? Is under full or regional anesthesia? are there expected problems?

Your blanket caveat that "...unless the mother's or infant's life are in danger...", is hardly appropriate. There are cases where things can develop especially in the OR. So, please, encourage him in your own experiences, and your impression of the size of the OR or delivery room you went to; but encouraging him to not care about the distractions that things can cause is problematic, to say the least. You may not have experienced any labor surprises (and I am thankful that not), do not assume that everything is that way...and yes..annoying the staff when they are still worrying about the health of an intraoperative patient is not the smartest thing to do.

"Common sense" is such a misnomer.

The only thing I agree with is your last paragraph. BTW - most staff want you to take pictures and enjoy the moment... just understand that we have a very different job...and one mistake can cost dearly.

Charlie wrote in post #15014615 (external link)
babies cant even see much, flash as you please, most shots will be posed anyhow. no camera when the csection in progress.

babies can see quite well. What you might be alluding to is that in the first couple of months they are very near sighted and have very little control of the movements of the eyes - as evidenced by tracking and convergence. But the sight neural pathways as well as the development of the sight center in the brain are quite functional. I would just be wary of the flash in the first hours of life - how would you like to have your picture taken after being in complete darkness and quiet and then emerging into the bustling OR quite vioelntly with bright lights and a periodic extra burst of light.... not a recommendation against - just a recommendation to consider the one who cannot speak for him/herself

and most of my parents are quite happy when they leave and have pictures to treasure.


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PLLphotography
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Sep 19, 2012 13:48 |  #20

I took my 50mm when my wife gave birth. it wasn't too tight for me.
depending on your wife's mood, she may want the lights bright, or down real low, so a fast prime would be ideal.

here's from when my wife gave birth, all with a 50mm lens. I used an off-camera flash, but it was bounced up towards the ceiling or off a wall, so it wasn't direct flash in his brand new eyes.

good luck (and congrats) to you and your wife!

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almost fogot the most important shot, his first :-)

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Charlie
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Sep 19, 2012 14:14 |  #21

ceriltheblade wrote in post #15014774 (external link)
babies can see quite well. What you might be alluding to is that in the first couple of months they are very near sighted and have very little control of the movements of the eyes - as evidenced by tracking and convergence. But the sight neural pathways as well as the development of the sight center in the brain are quite functional. I would just be wary of the flash in the first hours of life - how would you like to have your picture taken after being in complete darkness and quiet and then emerging into the bustling OR quite vioelntly with bright lights and a periodic extra burst of light.... not a recommendation against - just a recommendation to consider the one who cannot speak for him/herself

and most of my parents are quite happy when they leave and have pictures to treasure.

from what I remember, the delivery light was fairly bright and powerful, shining at the baby's face anyhow. A microsecond flash makes no difference compared to the bright and continuous light the baby has been exposed to.


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AlanU
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Sep 19, 2012 15:34 |  #22

I used my 5d w/ canon 50 f/1.4 for this photo. No flash but extremely bright lights in the OP room.

The entire room was bright enough requiring no flash. #3 is coming and this time I'll use my 35L instead of the 50mm.

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HyperYagami
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Sep 19, 2012 15:43 |  #23

Honestly, OP should go to the hospital first and ask what he can and can't do/bring when c-sec is going on. Every case is different.



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Sep 19, 2012 15:44 |  #24

true. some may not even allow cameras.

I was told I could take pictures only after the baby was delivered. I was being eyed like a hawk by a nurse :-)


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Sep 19, 2012 15:59 |  #25

I'm uncertain about the use of flash in the delivery room,too. Perhaps you could light a small bonfire in the corner?


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russ925
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Sep 19, 2012 17:22 |  #26

Hi all. I went with the 18-55 and the flash and honestly didn't go crazy in the OR.
I hooked my 50mm once we got settled in the room

All went well and I have another beautiful son.


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TSchrief
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Sep 19, 2012 17:38 |  #27
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C-section is serious surgery. Please leave the camera at home. Taking an unsanitized item like a camera into an operation room should be against the rules. If it is not, please worry more about your wife's and your child's health than what lens to use. Take pictures in the nursery, or from the gallery, if one is available. Do not take your camera into that environment, please.


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MNUplander
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Sep 19, 2012 19:20 |  #28

It's impressive for my wife, I just put her there. :)

Trust me, I'm far from an expert on anything - my post was just my gut response since I've been there so much lately, hardly anything to qualify any statement I make. I still stand by it for the most part because even if things do change quickly as you mention, a camera can go away just as quickly. And, common sense can help - as long as you have it - anticipating the moves of the staff, knowing when it's time to put the camera away and let the staff do their thing, etc. But, maybe I just did get lucky and if things had gone wrong who knows what havoc I may have caused being in the way - I certainly haven't been in that room enough to say.

However, the part I will agree with you on is the fact that this is a C-section - a more invasive procedure that requires more a more sterile environment and probably only came about because some sort of real or potential complication. While a delivery room may be an OK place for cameras at times, I'm in agreement that the OR is probably a different story.

OP, I'm glad it all went well - congrats!

ceriltheblade wrote in post #15014774 (external link)
it was probably wrong for me to say something where your expertise of two deliveries in approx 1 year;s time is so impressive

- but allow me to interject something -

the OP mentioned that he had a scheduled c-section. before you encourage him not worry about the staff and their jobs that they are doing both for his wife and his new addition, did you ever think to yourself - WHY the person is undergoing a csection in the first place? Maybe your experience can be different than the OPs? Are there any medical considerations in play? Is under full or regional anesthesia? are there expected problems?

Your blanket caveat that "...unless the mother's or infant's life are in danger...", is hardly appropriate. There are cases where things can develop especially in the OR. So, please, encourage him in your own experiences, and your impression of the size of the OR or delivery room you went to; but encouraging him to not care about the distractions that things can cause is problematic, to say the least. You may not have experienced any labor surprises (and I am thankful that not), do not assume that everything is that way...and yes..annoying the staff when they are still worrying about the health of an intraoperative patient is not the smartest thing to do.

"Common sense" is such a misnomer.

The only thing I agree with is your last paragraph. BTW - most staff want you to take pictures and enjoy the moment... just understand that we have a very different job...and one mistake can cost dearly.



babies can see quite well. What you might be alluding to is that in the first couple of months they are very near sighted and have very little control of the movements of the eyes - as evidenced by tracking and convergence. But the sight neural pathways as well as the development of the sight center in the brain are quite functional. I would just be wary of the flash in the first hours of life - how would you like to have your picture taken after being in complete darkness and quiet and then emerging into the bustling OR quite vioelntly with bright lights and a periodic extra burst of light.... not a recommendation against - just a recommendation to consider the one who cannot speak for him/herself

and most of my parents are quite happy when they leave and have pictures to treasure.


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Sep 19, 2012 19:38 |  #29

TSchrief wrote in post #15015937 (external link)
C-section is serious surgery. Please leave the camera at home. Taking an unsanitized item like a camera into an operation room should be against the rules. If it is not, please worry more about your wife's and your child's health than what lens to use. Take pictures in the nursery, or from the gallery, if one is available. Do not take your camera into that environment, please.

Our first child was born surgically. They dragged my entire filthy person into the OR and they didn't scrub me down a bit. I'm doubtless a lot grubbier overall from the standpoint of bacteria and viruses than some camera.

I did make it a point not to stick my hands or camera into my wife's open abdomen. That seemed like common sense.

In any case, all this chastizing about what one should bring in the OR etc. Here is an idea....if you want to take some pictures then bring the camera. If the hospital has a reason for you to not take pictures or not bring something into the OR, then they will inform you and you should follow their instructions. That really seems like common sense.


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TSchrief
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Sep 19, 2012 20:49 |  #30
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JeffreyG wrote in post #15016397 (external link)
Our first child was born surgically. They dragged my entire filthy person into the OR and they didn't scrub me down a bit. I'm doubtless a lot grubbier overall from the standpoint of bacteria and viruses than some camera.

I did make it a point not to stick my hands or camera into my wife's open abdomen. That seemed like common sense.

In any case, all this chastizing about what one should bring in the OR etc. Here is an idea....if you want to take some pictures then bring the camera. If the hospital has a reason for you to not take pictures or not bring something into the OR, then they will inform you and you should follow their instructions. That really seems like common sense.

Good points. I would just talk to the OR staff and the doctor first.


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