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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Astronomy & Celestial Talk 
Thread started 21 Sep 2012 (Friday) 14:26
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Is this telescope worth it?

 
cyberon
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Sep 26, 2012 05:55 |  #16

neimad19 wrote in post #15042302 (external link)
Thanks for all the info and insight! I think for now I'l research into astrophotography and read up as much as I can about telescopes, mounts and the night sky before I start throwing money into it before I know exactly what I want.

Wise decision!


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fogboundturtle
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Sep 26, 2012 08:49 |  #17

cyberon wrote in post #15044194 (external link)
Wise decision!

yes. Go to public outreach program and look into as many scope as you can. I suggest you do observation before photography. Learning the sky is an paramount skill.


Canon 5D Mark III, Canon 70D, Canon EF 24-105L, Tamron 150-600mm, Tamron 70-200 F2.8 DI VC USD, Sony A7r, Sony FE 55mm F1.8

  
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Skul
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Sep 26, 2012 19:00 |  #18

One does not, need to spend even a thousand bucks to take reasonable night shots.

The tripod/head....
http://www.astronomics​.com …atorial-mount_p19034.aspx (external link)
The drive....
http://www.celestron.c​om …e-da-for-cg-4-mounts.html (external link)
This will allow at least full minute exposures with a 200mm lens.
Two minutes with a 100mm.

Longer duration shots will need to be guided, and you can do that without an expensive auto-guider.
You would need a telescope such as...
http://www.optcorp.com​/product.aspx?pid=638-13535 (external link)
(Throw away the head and tripod that comes with it)
And, an illuminated reticle eyepiece...
http://www.optcorp.com​/ProductList.aspx?uid=​30-155 (external link)
Amount spent--- $480
I would not suggest attaching the camera to the scope for anything other than lunar/planetary shots where exposure time is less than a couple seconds.




  
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fogboundturtle
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Sep 27, 2012 08:58 |  #19

Skul wrote in post #15047209 (external link)
One does not, need to spend even a thousand bucks to take reasonable night shots.

The tripod/head....
http://www.astronomics​.com …atorial-mount_p19034.aspx (external link)
The drive....
http://www.celestron.c​om …e-da-for-cg-4-mounts.html (external link)
This will allow at least full minute exposures with a 200mm lens.
Two minutes with a 100mm.

Longer duration shots will need to be guided, and you can do that without an expensive auto-guider.
You would need a telescope such as...
http://www.optcorp.com​/product.aspx?pid=638-13535 (external link)
(Throw away the head and tripod that comes with it)
And, an illuminated reticle eyepiece...
http://www.optcorp.com​/ProductList.aspx?uid=​30-155 (external link)
Amount spent--- $480
I would not suggest attaching the camera to the scope for anything other than lunar/planetary shots where exposure time is less than a couple seconds.

I disagree. First of all, its not an apochromatic refractor. Stars are going to come out purple. 2nd of all, 1 wind rift and your picture are going to be messed up with such a small mount. 3rd of all, only 200m ? Wow that is extremely wide. I can see that being worthed if you want to do Milky way shot but for galaxies and faint fuzzies, it becomes a problem. If you shoot in the city, you need at least 1 Light Pollution filter.

I've done this for many years. I learned from my mistake. Save the frustration of having to deal with inadequate equipment. Its hard enough to make your whole setup work when its all good gear.


Canon 5D Mark III, Canon 70D, Canon EF 24-105L, Tamron 150-600mm, Tamron 70-200 F2.8 DI VC USD, Sony A7r, Sony FE 55mm F1.8

  
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Skul
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Location: SE Texas
     
Sep 28, 2012 14:27 |  #20

fogboundturtle wrote in post #15049379 (external link)
I disagree. First of all, its not an apochromatic refractor. Stars are going to come out purple. 2nd of all, 1 wind rift and your picture are going to be messed up with such a small mount. 3rd of all, only 200m ? Wow that is extremely wide. I can see that being worthed if you want to do Milky way shot but for galaxies and faint fuzzies, it becomes a problem. If you shoot in the city, you need at least 1 Light Pollution filter.

I've done this for many years. I learned from my mistake. Save the frustration of having to deal with inadequate equipment. Its hard enough to make your whole setup work when its all good gear.

Please note, the OTA is being used as a guide scope, NOT as the lens.
I've been messing with it for 15 years, and the poster needs to start slow, go slow and learn. Hitting him with high cost may discourge that.
He needs to learn the sky, learn the camera, and discover whether he wants to make a step up.
BTW, that 200mm does a nice job. So does my 12" f/10.




  
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Monique10
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Nov 17, 2012 08:55 |  #21

Scrumhalf wrote in post #15036559 (external link)
Just to make sure, goto does not mean that it has tracking capability. Goto is just a computerized database that will allow the scope to drive to various objects with the push of a button. Saves time, although purists might scoff. You can have dobsonian reflectors with goto, although they don't track.

Also, to OP... what do you want to take a picture of? Planets and wide-field photography of the sky, or deep fuzzies like galaxies and nebulae? If they former, then your alt-az mount will do just fine, as the exposure times will be relatively short. For deep fuzzies, you need an equatorial mount.

- Owner of a Celestron CPC1100 (big SCT) and a Televue TV-85 apochromatic refractor (sweet little scope).

I am just learning about the tools I would need to venture into astrophotography and found this thread. Please excuse my utter ignorance but there is a good deal going on the C11 and I can get an Orion Atlas mount for a good price too. Would I need an accessory of some sort to mount the Celestron on an Orion mount and would this be a good setup for deep sky photography with my 5D2? Apologies if I these are very basic questions.




  
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Nighthound
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Nov 18, 2012 01:14 |  #22

Monique10 wrote in post #15256416 (external link)
I am just learning about the tools I would need to venture into astrophotography and found this thread. Please excuse my utter ignorance but there is a good deal going on the C11 and I can get an Orion Atlas mount for a good price too. Would I need an accessory of some sort to mount the Celestron on an Orion mount and would this be a good setup for deep sky photography with my 5D2? Apologies if I these are very basic questions.

I have owned the C11(carbon) and it's a quality optical tube. The Atlas is a very good mount for starting out, however the C11 is pushing the weight limit for the Atlas when it comes to imaging deep sky objects. I'm not saying it can't be done but it would likely require a guide scope to extend your exposures to optimal lengths. The manufacturer load limit for the Atlas is 40 pounds, the C11 is 27.5 pounds minus the camera and other hardware. The rule of thumb for a mount when it comes to long exposure work is to be around half the mount's limit. If you were to opt for a guide scope the weight would go up considerably and would increase the load on the mount considerably. The C11 has the advantage of high focal length but with that comes the requirement of very accurate tracking. The weight imposed upon a mount as well as proper balance of all gear on it is critical to tracking accuracy. By reducing the load with a lighter optical tube you'll be taking one less hurdle out of the equation and reducing focal length with a smaller tube will further simplify the entire process.

If you do decide to get the C11 you'd want to consider a few things. The C11 a f/10 tube so for deep sky imaging you'd want to shoot with a focal reducer to speed it up to f/6.3. Schmidt-cassegrain designs with the corrector plate at the front are prone to dew and frost issues if you live in an area where this can be a problem. You'll want to get some form of dew prevention system if that's the case. That big piece of glass facing skyward will fog up pretty quick once the outside temp and glass reach dew point. Dew or frost will end an imaging session pretty quick and hovering with a blow dryer will make for a long and unproductive night. Lastly, being a close tubed design requires a period of temperature adjustment to get the inside temp to closely match the outside temp. If the two are far apart internal tube currents will distort images much like the distortion you see over a highway in the hot sun. Large tubes take longer to equalize temps, I found my C11 took at least an hour even when storing the tube in the garage where it stayed closest to the outside temps.

The combo you mention would be an outstanding planetary imaging rig. The exposures are short and the high focal length would give you the magnification needed for such small objects. The C11 is an excellent galaxy scope because of the high magnification but I'd be concerned about using it for that purpose on the Atlas because of the long exposures needed for such dim objects. If you were to add a guide scope you'd likely be ok but you'd have to work at it for a while and guiding is crossing into the advanced category. Starting out as you are will present many challenges under the best gear scenario. I'd suggest a shorter focal length(and lighter) optical tube on the Atlas and give yourself time to learn the basics.

I've been at this for quite some time and jumped on the high focal length train starting out. It was a struggle and many large optical tubes later I settled in the 500-800mm range with a very hearty mount(capacity 60 pounds). Every thing got easier once I quit pushing the mount and my productivity went way up not to mention the fun factor.

Consider a quality color-corrected(APO) refractor if it's in the budget. There are many, many objects in the sky that are in the range of lower focal lengths.

Hope this helps in some way.


Steve
Canon Gear: 1D Mark IV | 1D Mark II | 5D | 20D | 500L IS (f/4) | 100-400L
SteveEllwoodPhotograph​y.com (external link)

  
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Is this telescope worth it?
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