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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Sports 
Thread started 29 Sep 2012 (Saturday) 08:52
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Got the ball - miss the head

 
lauderdalems
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Sep 29, 2012 08:52 |  #1

Now I need to work on getting the whole picture. Problem was I was too close to the action with the 70-200. Taken at ISO6400

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
HTTP response: 404 | MIME changed to 'text/html' | Byte size: ZERO

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Seapup
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Sep 29, 2012 08:56 |  #2

Two steps back and zoom out to 70mm and you would have nailed it. ;) Love the squishy ball effect in that shot! :D


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rick_reno
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Sep 29, 2012 08:58 |  #3

nice color and focus




  
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lauderdalems
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Sep 29, 2012 10:58 |  #4

Thanks for looking and comments. Seapup - could not move back as I was sitting at scoring table and I wanted to be near floor level and not in the stands


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elrey2375
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Sep 29, 2012 11:16 |  #5

if it comes down to a choice between head or feet, always take the head.


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TheBrick3
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Sep 29, 2012 11:28 |  #6

elrey2375 wrote in post #15057802 (external link)
if it comes down to a choice between head or feet, always take the head.

Yup. If you'd aimed a little higher you could've zoomed or cropped in. It comes with practice though (or at least that's what they say -- I never figured sports shooting out).


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Zivnuska
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Sep 29, 2012 13:53 |  #7

lauderdalems wrote in post #15057428 (external link)
Now I need to work on getting the whole picture.

If you are shooting a sports event (such as a volleyball match), get some full body images, shot a little looser, to be sure that you have some 'safeties' among your shots. Once you've got that covered, be sure to try some really tight shots. When you do that, your keeper rate will go down but the photos that are good will be exceptional.

Suppose you are shooting a libero returning the serve. Every so often, the player will have to dive forward to dig a short serve. If you set up to capture that shot at floor level, you may have a chance to capture a really exceptional image. However, that strategy may cause you to end up with nothing if the plan doesn't work out. So go ahead and get the "whole picture" for many of your images. Just remember to take some chances on getting the WOW shot.

I once spent a whole game laying on the floor with a 300mm lens trying to shoot between the legs of the team on the near side of the court just so that I could get a super tight shot of the opposite libero as described above. I got nothing. That's OK. There were plenty of routine shots and sometimes you need to try for something more. Dare to go out of your comfort range.

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elrey2375
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Sep 29, 2012 14:41 |  #8

Zivnuska wrote in post #15058178 (external link)
If you are shooting a sports event (such as a volleyball match), get some full body images, shot a little looser, to be sure that you have some 'safeties' among your shots. Once you've got that covered, be sure to try some really tight shots. When you do that, your keeper rate will go down but the photos that are good will be exceptional.

Suppose you are shooting a libero returning the serve. Every so often, the player will have to dive forward to dig a short serve. If you set up to capture that shot at floor level, you may have a chance to capture a really exceptional image. However, that strategy may cause you to end up with nothing if the plan doesn't work out. So go ahead and get the "whole picture" for many of your images. Just remember to take some chances on getting the WOW shot.

I once spent a whole game laying on the floor with a 300mm lens trying to shoot between the legs of the team on the near side of the court just so that I could get a super tight shot of the opposite libero as described above. I got nothing. That's OK. There were plenty of routine shots and sometimes you need to try for something more. Dare to go out of your comfort range.

Phil

Very good advice and exactly what I try to do most of the time. Get what you need out of the way and then you can try for something great. It might not happen, but if it doesn't, that's ok.


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lauderdalems
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Sep 30, 2012 10:37 |  #9

Thanks for the comment and great advise Zivnuska - enjoyed looking at your volleyball collection on your website. I had already gotten plenty of needed shots in this game and was looking for something different. I tried shooting with my 24-70, but with the high ISO I did not want to to do much cropping. I believe in shoot tight and crop tighter - but this was a dark college gym. I was not expecting this player to get the serve, but those things happen.


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Zivnuska
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Oct 01, 2012 07:10 |  #10

lauderdalems wrote in post #15060887 (external link)
Thanks for the comment and great advise Zivnuska - enjoyed looking at your volleyball collection on your website. I had already gotten plenty of needed shots in this game and was looking for something different. I tried shooting with my 24-70, but with the high ISO I did not want to to do much cropping. I believe in shoot tight and crop tighter - but this was a dark college gym. I was not expecting this player to get the serve, but those things happen.

I feel your pain! I've missed this shot plenty of times and will miss more tomorrow.

If I want to gamble on a shot like this, there are three ways I approach it. The first is to go portrait orientation-full body in anticipation of a return much like what you encountered here. Low risk. Better keeper percentage. Low reward.

The second is to shoot landscape at the level of the head--trying to capture the action from the waist up. That would have worked here.

The third is to guess that the player will dive forward to dig the shot just above the court floor. You may have to pre-focus on the player's knee because the dive forward will happen pretty quick. This is my favorite shot. Tough to get. Lots of misses but cool if you can pull it off. Getting a good angle on the face may require you to move more camera right to get a nice view of the eyes. The lower the camera body, the more dramatic the result. Image #3 here is good example: https://photography-on-the.net …/showthread.php​?t=1231213
Tip of the hat to PhotoGeek
____________

One shot that is easy to get is of the serve. The tendency at first is to try to capture the moment of impact with the ball. However, there is a moment when the player is just starting to toss the ball up and her arms frame her face. Shoot it tight. Focus on her eyes. The shutter speed need not be super fast. Position yourself to optimize the background. You can blur the muticolored crowd for one look or move yourself to have the US flag in the backdrop for another classic look. Think background for this shot. Post process like you would for a portrait. Check #4 here:

https://photography-on-the.net …/showthread.php​?t=1232710


Low risk and it will sell to parents. It's almost a glamour shot. Timeless pose that you should include in your galleries. You may need to adjust for someone who uses the jump serve.

Phil


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PhotoGeek
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Oct 01, 2012 15:16 |  #11

Zivnuska wrote in post #15064180 (external link)
I feel your pain! I've missed this shot plenty of times and will miss more tomorrow.

If I want to gamble on a shot like this, there are three ways I approach it. The first is to go portrait orientation-full body in anticipation of a return much like what you encountered here. Low risk. Better keeper percentage. Low reward.

The second is to shoot landscape at the level of the head--trying to capture the action from the waist up. That would have worked here.

The third is to guess that the player will dive forward to dig the shot just above the court floor. You may have to pre-focus on the player's knee because the dive forward will happen pretty quick. This is my favorite shot. Tough to get. Lots of misses but cool if you can pull it off. Getting a good angle on the face may require you to move more camera right to get a nice view of the eyes. The lower the camera body, the more dramatic the result. Image #3 here is good example: https://photography-on-the.net …/showthread.php​?t=1231213
Tip of the hat to PhotoGeek
____________

One shot that is easy to get is of the serve. The tendency at first is to try to capture the moment of impact with the ball. However, there is a moment when the player is just starting to toss the ball up and her arms frame her face. Shoot it tight. Focus on her eyes. The shutter speed need not be super fast. Position yourself to optimize the background. You can blur the muticolored crowd for one look or move yourself to have the US flag in the backdrop for another classic look. Think background for this shot. Post process like you would for a portrait. Check #4 here:

https://photography-on-the.net …/showthread.php​?t=1232710


Low risk and it will sell to parents. It's almost a glamour shot. Timeless pose that you should include in your galleries. You may need to adjust for someone who uses the jump serve.

Phil

LOL . . . thanks Phil, but the tip of the hat actually goes to you since you gave me the idea to start shooting from that position!

My girls all jump serve, which makes that sportrait tough to get during the serve.


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liam5100
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Oct 03, 2012 18:07 |  #12

Phil is the volleyball guy.. you guys have me itching for it now, I actually have a free weekend this weekend with no football so I might run and grab an NCAA game and see if I can apply some of Phil's advice. If I remember right too, I think it might have been Kevin awhile back put a really well laid out guide for shooting positions on here as well.

Although, I am afraid to lay on the floor for very long, I'm sure I'd doze off and the snoring would be embarrassing.


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lauderdalems
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Oct 03, 2012 18:37 |  #13

If I was to lay on the floor for 2 minutes they would probably already have an ambulance on the way. But you guys have some great volleyball pixs. Now my biggest problem is I don't have any volleyball games to shoot for 3 weeks - just soccer and football.


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Got the ball - miss the head
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