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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 18 Nov 2012 (Sunday) 20:37
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Canon 50mm 1.4 or Samyang 35mm F1.4 UMC ?

 
back2grave
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Nov 18, 2012 20:37 |  #1

Gurus,

I'm planning to buy my first prime lens, primarily for potrait and low light photography. I zero'd down to canon 50mm 1.4 but then bumped into Samyang 35mm 1.4. I saw some pretty cool shots in sample photo section. Just trying to understand if there's a fair comparison between the two in terms of IQ, sharpness, etc.

I've a 7d and not really looking for an expensive L prime lens.

Any pointers will be highly appreciated.

-Thanks




  
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velllabellla
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Nov 18, 2012 21:06 |  #2

back2grave wrote in post #15261834 (external link)
Gurus,

I'm planning to buy my first prime lens, primarily for potrait and low light photography. I zero'd down to canon 50mm 1.4 but then bumped into Samyang 35mm 1.4. I saw some pretty cool shots in sample photo section. Just trying to understand if there's a fair comparison between the two in terms of IQ, sharpness, etc.

I've a 7d and not really looking for an expensive L prime lens.

Any pointers will be highly appreciated.

-Thanks

http://www.bobatkins.c​om …technical/digit​aldof.html (external link)

That is the best break down I have found on the debate with prime lenses and crop sensors. I went with the 50mm 1.8 to try it out, I just ordered the 1.4; since according to this guy the 50mm is actually giving me around 35mm regardless, or at least that is what I got from this article. The article is a little long winded, but honestly what isn't in digital photography.
Here is a picture I took with the 1.8 in pretty cloudy situations, and it was semi backlit, I shot this wide open too, at 1.8, awesome bokeh, cant wait to see what my 1.4 will look like. I do kids photography and portraits.

IMAGE: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8053/8103841939_85281cd3f3_c.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com/​photos/poshpenny/81038​41939/  (external link)
Posh Penny Photography Childs Portrait (external link) by Posh Penny Photography (external link), on Flickr



  
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Sovern
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Nov 18, 2012 21:30 as a reply to  @ velllabellla's post |  #3
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Personally if portrature is what you want to shoot than I would get the Canon 85 1.8 USM. Here are my reasons why:

  • The Canon 85 1.8 has a more flattering telephoto compression than both the 50mm and the 35mm
  • the 85 1.8 has better bokeh than the 50 1.4 and also the 35 due to it being a longer lens and it having more aperture blades (I believe it has more aperture blades but I'm 100% sure it has better bokeh than both lenses)
  • The 85 1.8 has True USM and will focus way faster and way more accurately than the 50 1.4 which only has micro USM and is re known for having trouble focusing in low light
  • the 85 1.8 has full time manual which can get you out of tricky situations

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back2grave
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Nov 18, 2012 22:16 |  #4

velllabellla wrote in post #15261923 (external link)
http://www.bobatkins.c​om …technical/digit​aldof.html (external link)

That is the best break down I have found on the debate with prime lenses and crop sensors. I went with the 50mm 1.8 to try it out, I just ordered the 1.4; since according to this guy the 50mm is actually giving me around 35mm regardless, or at least that is what I got from this article. The article is a little long winded, but honestly what isn't in digital photography.
Here is a picture I took with the 1.8 in pretty cloudy situations, and it was semi backlit, I shot this wide open too, at 1.8, awesome bokeh, cant wait to see what my 1.4 will look like. I do kids photography and portraits.
QUOTED IMAGE
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com/​photos/poshpenny/81038​41939/  (external link)
Posh Penny Photography Childs Portrait (external link) by Posh Penny Photography (external link), on Flickr

Thanks for the input, the bokeh and sharpness is pretty nice. Just curios, is this taken on a full-frame ?




  
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back2grave
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Nov 18, 2012 22:23 |  #5

Sovern wrote in post #15262036 (external link)
Personally if portrature is what you want to shoot than I would get the Canon 85 1.8 USM. Here are my reasons why:

  • The Canon 85 1.8 has a more flattering telephoto compression than both the 50mm and the 35mm
  • the 85 1.8 has better bokeh than the 50 1.4 and also the 35 due to it being a longer lens and it having more aperture blades (I believe it has more aperture blades but I'm 100% sure it has better bokeh than both lenses)
  • The 85 1.8 has True USM and will focus way faster and way more accurately than the 50 1.4 which only has micro USM and is re known for having trouble focusing in low light
  • the 85 1.8 has full time manual which can get you out of tricky situations

Thanks Sovern, I'm too keen on 85 mm since it'll translate to 136 mm on a 7d. That's one of the reason I'm trying to stick around 50mm.




  
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Yarik
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Nov 18, 2012 22:32 |  #6

The 50mm is pretty nice indoors, a little tougher for big group shots, but nice for portraits and couples. The 85mm indoors would be for more of a upper torso to head portraits.
Outside, the 85 probably wins.
And from what i've researched around, the 85 1.8 seems to be regarded as like the best (budget) portrait lens for a crop sensor, which is very close to a 135mm on a full frame camera, which is conveniently considered as the best portrait FL for a FF :)

And I have a 50 1.8, and in about 4 days will be receiving my 85 1.8 that my wife is getting me for Christmas :D


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back2grave
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Nov 18, 2012 23:13 |  #7

Yarik wrote in post #15262249 (external link)
The 50mm is pretty nice indoors, a little tougher for big group shots, but nice for portraits and couples. The 85mm indoors would be for more of a upper torso to head portraits.
Outside, the 85 probably wins.
And from what i've researched around, the 85 1.8 seems to be regarded as like the best (budget) portrait lens for a crop sensor, which is very close to a 135mm on a full frame camera, which is conveniently considered as the best portrait FL for a FF :)

And I have a 50 1.8, and in about 4 days will be receiving my 85 1.8 that my wife is getting me for Christmas :D

Nice, wish I could convince my wife as well :) . Jokes apart, 85mm for a crop-sensor body will be an issue for indoor shots unless you are shooting in a stadium or bigger enclosure.On the flipside, as you've mentioned, 85mm perhaps topples 50mm outdoors.

Any take on Samyang 35mm f1.4 ?




  
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sullivanrp
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Nov 19, 2012 00:36 |  #8

I have the samyang 35mm 1.4, and also used to have a canon 50mm 1.4 alongside it. I found that during a portrait session 2/3 of my photos came from the 35mm rather than the 50. I just found that I preferred the 35mm focal length on crop over the 50 1.4. In my opinion the image quality and sharpness was better, as well as bokeh. Also, because the Samyang is manual focus (I dont know if you knew that...) i found myself getting more exact focus when focusing in live view with digital zoom (the best method I've learned to use the lens).

The canon 50 1.4's build quality isn't the best either - the focus ring tends to jam quite easily even if you are careful as I have learned (twice, unfortunately).

So, I kept the samyang and downgraded my 50 to a 1.8, but still prefer the 35mm 1.4 for it's IQ and focal length. Once you get used to manual focusing with it in live view and you are nailing focus it is an incredible, incredible lens, on par with the 35L on image quality through all the reviews and comparisons I've seen (and when I've used the 35L the only thing I found noticably better was the auto focus).

I have also used the 85 1.8 before, and it is freaking awesome for portraits. I think a Samyang 35 1.4 paired with the 85 1.8 would be ideal, maybe a 50 1.8 in there too as all intro low-cost lenses.

If you have to choose one think about the focal length you prefer using based on the gear you currently have... but honestly I'd throw the 85 1.8 in instead of the 50 1.4 due to build and my personal experience...

The only thing that holds me back from fully recommending the Samyang is its lack of autofocus. Otherwise, I absolutely love it.


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back2grave
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Nov 19, 2012 00:57 |  #9

sullivanrp wrote in post #15262543 (external link)
I have the samyang 35mm 1.4, and also used to have a canon 50mm 1.4 alongside it. I found that during a portrait session 2/3 of my photos came from the 35mm rather than the 50. I just found that I preferred the 35mm focal length on crop over the 50 1.4. In my opinion the image quality and sharpness was better, as well as bokeh. Also, because the Samyang is manual focus (I dont know if you knew that...) i found myself getting more exact focus when focusing in live view with digital zoom (the best method I've learned to use the lens).

The canon 50 1.4's build quality isn't the best either - the focus ring tends to jam quite easily even if you are careful as I have learned (twice, unfortunately).

So, I kept the samyang and downgraded my 50 to a 1.8, but still prefer the 35mm 1.4 for it's IQ and focal length. Once you get used to manual focusing with it in live view and you are nailing focus it is an incredible, incredible lens, on par with the 35L on image quality through all the reviews and comparisons I've seen (and when I've used the 35L the only thing I found noticably better was the auto focus).

I have also used the 85 1.8 before, and it is freaking awesome for portraits. I think a Samyang 35 1.4 paired with the 85 1.8 would be ideal, maybe a 50 1.8 in there too as all intro low-cost lenses.

If you have to choose one think about the focal length you prefer using based on the gear you currently have... but honestly I'd throw the 85 1.8 in instead of the 50 1.4 due to build and my personal experience...

The only thing that holds me back from fully recommending the Samyang is its lack of autofocus. Otherwise, I absolutely love it.

Thanks sullivanrp, that was very informative. 35mm is right focal length based on my criteria at this point, I'm I know that Samyang is manual focus, but the primary reason to seek out advice is how well it performs. I've had pretty aweful experience with third party lens for canon mount, hence wanted to get some feedback. Looks like you are pretty satisfies, which kind of resonates with the sample shots and some of the reviews I've seen so far. Just one question, based on your experience, have you found any issues with manual focusing at low light or indoors ?




  
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Judsonzhao
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Nov 19, 2012 01:05 |  #10

I'm selling my 35 1.4 only becuz it's a little bit bulky. But it's optically fantastic, can say a single bad thing on it. Portrait by this lens is quite good. Low light performance is monster.

You really need a precision focus screen if you go samyang/rokinon 35. Or you can use liveview.


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ZoneV
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Nov 19, 2012 02:31 |  #11

As far as I know on the 7D it is not easy the change the focussing screen. For manual focus with fast lenses I would reccomend a better focussing screen. So no rccomendation for tha Samyang.

Furthermore no reccomendation for the Samyang because of the bad mechanics of this lens.

I have done some portrait work with a crop DSLR and the EF 50/1.4. It works good. But be sure to buy a bajonett hood for the lens - not a screw in type - and use it all the time to prevent the AF mechanics problem. I strongly suggest to use the hood even inside the photo back!


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XxDJCyberLoverxX
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Nov 19, 2012 08:43 |  #12

Judsonzhao wrote in post #15262609 (external link)
I'm selling my 35 1.4 only becuz it's a little bit bulky. But it's optically fantastic, can say a single bad thing on it. Portrait by this lens is quite good. Low light performance is monster.

You really need a precision focus screen if you go samyang/rokinon 35. Or you can use liveview.

Cant agree more. Some of my best portraits were taken with the Samyang 35mm, but you really need a precision focusing screen to get the best out of that lens.

I hate using live view to shoot, especially candids, so the focusing screen is more useful.

I enjoyed using it on the 40D, and now on my 5DII.


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Nov 19, 2012 08:57 |  #13

back2grave wrote in post #15261834 (external link)
Gurus,
Just trying to understand if there's a fair comparison between the two in terms of IQ, sharpness, etc.
-Thanks

No, get the Canon. Even though the rest seemed to stray off your OP.


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back2grave
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Nov 19, 2012 16:51 |  #14

Thanks all for sharing awesome inputs .. it does help a lot in picking the right lens. I'm planning to rent a samyang for few days and try it out myself. Canon 50mm is the fallback plan, for now at-least :-)




  
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sullivanrp
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Nov 19, 2012 21:56 |  #15

back2grave wrote in post #15262594 (external link)
Thanks sullivanrp, that was very informative. 35mm is right focal length based on my criteria at this point, I'm I know that Samyang is manual focus, but the primary reason to seek out advice is how well it performs. I've had pretty aweful experience with third party lens for canon mount, hence wanted to get some feedback. Looks like you are pretty satisfies, which kind of resonates with the sample shots and some of the reviews I've seen so far. Just one question, based on your experience, have you found any issues with manual focusing at low light or indoors ?

I have always used liveview for shooting with this lens really, and haven't had too much of a problem on my t2i. However, for some reason in live view the exposure simulation doesn't seem to work right, and everything looks underexposed - however I throw it into movie mode and it exposes correctly and you can still snap stills - the drawback is that you cant shoot multiple frames quickly (You can't really in liveview anyhow, honestly).

The build is pretty good and I enjoy the quality photos I get from it. Definitely try it out and see how you like it, the first time or two using it isn't super satisfactory, as it's hard to get used to the manual focus. However, once you get used to it you love it, and you find yourself wanting to manual focus with other lenses because you get used to getting such a precise focus rather than risk auto focus at such a low depth of field. Maybe try a tripod too, just if you are having trouble, but I shoot freehand. I shoot around mainly 2.8 btw on the aperture ring so I have some wiggle room rather than 1.4 usually. hope it goes well.


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Canon 50mm 1.4 or Samyang 35mm F1.4 UMC ?
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