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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 28 Nov 2012 (Wednesday) 09:05
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Old Digital Rebel 300D

 
eiram21
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Nov 28, 2012 09:05 |  #1

Hi Al!
I'm new here and just started getting interested in photography again. I've started a food blog called FeelingFoodish (www.feelingfoodish.com (external link) to see some photos) and am posting recipes with photos in an attempt to try new foods and learn my camera. My camera is OLD! It is no longer being sold. Unfortunately, when I bought it I never learned to use it. I used to shoot on automatic all the time. I'm now using the Aperature priority and Manual features with more confidence but there is still much to learn with regard to controlling the light and other things.

My question is basically this: what do the newer cameras offer that I'm missing in my 300D? Well, I should say which new features are important to a new user like me? I'm also interested in taking some action shots of my girls sporting events and the 300D does 2.5 frames per second, I think. I guess that's not the best? I also don't think I have image stabilization. Any other insight and recommendations would be appreciated.

I'd be willing to spend up to $1500 but I need to justify the spend since i keep hearing that it's the photographer and not the camera that make the difference.

Should I just stick with my 300D?


Marie
www.feelingfoodish.com (external link)
Newbie photographer
Gear: Canon 60D with kit lens, Canon 60mm Macro, Canon 50 mm/1.8

  
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David_MC
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Nov 28, 2012 10:03 |  #2

What lenses do you currently own and are these sporting events indoors or outdoors and are they during the day time or at night.


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Canon 7D, Canon Speedlite 430EX II, EF-S 18-135mm IS STM, Tamron SP Di VC USD 70-300mm, EF 50mm 1.8, EF-S 24mm STM, EF-S 10-18mm IS STM

  
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DC ­ Fan
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Nov 28, 2012 10:21 |  #3

eiram21 wrote in post #15299433 (external link)
Hi Al!
I'm new here and just started getting interested in photography again. I've started a food blog called FeelingFoodish (www.feelingfoodish.com (external link) to see some photos) and am posting recipes with photos in an attempt to try new foods and learn my camera. My camera is OLD! It is no longer being sold. Unfortunately, when I bought it I never learned to use it. I used to shoot on automatic all the time. I'm now using the Aperature priority and Manual features with more confidence but there is still much to learn with regard to controlling the light and other things.

My question is basically this: what do the newer cameras offer that I'm missing in my 300D? Well, I should say which new features are important to a new user like me? I'm also interested in taking some action shots of my girls sporting events and the 300D does 2.5 frames per second, I think. I guess that's not the best? I also don't think I have image stabilization. Any other insight and recommendations would be appreciated.

I'd be willing to spend up to $1500 but I need to justify the spend since i keep hearing that it's the photographer and not the camera that make the difference.

Should I just stick with my 300D?

The main practical limits with a 300D are the small image buffer which allows only four JPEG images in a row to be exposed, and the highest ISO of 1600, which is low by current standards. Any of the current T-series digital Rebels would be good replacements and would by easy to operate for someone used to a 300D. The only major changes would be batteries (Canon moved away from the BP-511 after this model) and the switch from the 300D's CompactFlash cards and the T-series' Secure Digital cards.

A T3i is reasonably priced, (external link) and its capability to generate images is essentially the same as the other Canon 18MP camera. It's a camera you can comfortably grow into for years before you come anywhere near reaching the camera's limits.




  
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1ds4Me
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Nov 28, 2012 10:27 |  #4

eiram21 wrote in post #15299433 (external link)
Hi Al!
I'm new here and just started getting interested in photography again. I've started a food blog called FeelingFoodish (www.feelingfoodish.com (external link) to see some photos) and am posting recipes with photos in an attempt to try new foods and learn my camera. My camera is OLD! It is no longer being sold. Unfortunately, when I bought it I never learned to use it. I used to shoot on automatic all the time. I'm now using the Aperature priority and Manual features with more confidence but there is still much to learn with regard to controlling the light and other things.

My question is basically this: what do the newer cameras offer that I'm missing in my 300D? Well, I should say which new features are important to a new user like me? I'm also interested in taking some action shots of my girls sporting events and the 300D does 2.5 frames per second, I think. I guess that's not the best? I also don't think I have image stabilization. Any other insight and recommendations would be appreciated.

I'd be willing to spend up to $1500 but I need to justify the spend since i keep hearing that it's the photographer and not the camera that make the difference.

Should I just stick with my 300D?

The 300D is still a fantastic camera because good cameras simply do not stop taking good pictures. However, the 300D is limited in terms of action. If you are simply looking for that one or two keepers then then 300D should be OK. But, if you want 80% of keepers for action shots then I would go with the 1D MKIIN. The 1DMKII will give you some fantastic action shots when paired with a good lens. Your $1500 budget should buy you a 1DMKII and a decent 70-200mm f2.8.
The 1DMKII is also 8MP which is slightly better than the 300D and it will blow the 300D away for action shots. You won't find that much difference in landscapes.
The newer sensors will give you better DR but with good PP skills and good exposures, you should be OK with most decent DSLRS.




  
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eiram21
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Nov 28, 2012 13:29 |  #5

1ds4Me wrote in post #15299796 (external link)
The 300D is still a fantastic camera because good cameras simply do not stop taking good pictures. However, the 300D is limited in terms of action. If you are simply looking for that one or two keepers then then 300D should be OK. But, if you want 80% of keepers for action shots then I would go with the 1D MKIIN. The 1DMKII will give you some fantastic action shots when paired with a good lens. Your $1500 budget should buy you a 1DMKII and a decent 70-200mm f2.8.
The 1DMKII is also 8MP which is slightly better than the 300D and it will blow the 300D away for action shots. You won't find that much difference in landscapes.
The newer sensors will give you better DR but with good PP skills and good exposures, you should be OK with most decent DSLRS.

Is DR "dynamic range"? I'm trying to learn more about PP using Lightroom. There is sooo much to learn.
I am really only looking for those 1 or 2 keepers when it comes to action shots, I guess. I'm just having a hard time justifying the expense at this point considering that I haven't mastered this ole thing yet! I'm using it 99% of the time for food blogging, taking those still shot photos in low light (my house isn't very sunny) Would LOVE to get tack sharp photos but haven't had luck yet. Using 50mm/1.8 lens most of the time.

Just finished shooting some soup photos and was so excited to view them. Then I realized the camera card wasn't in the camera!! This has happened so many times. Another reason I want a new camera. Don't the newer ones record right to the camera?

Errr...the camera you recommended looks like it's selling for 5K? Maybe I misunderstood? http://www.amazon.com …creativeASIN%3D​B0001G112O (external link)

Thanks for your input.


Marie
www.feelingfoodish.com (external link)
Newbie photographer
Gear: Canon 60D with kit lens, Canon 60mm Macro, Canon 50 mm/1.8

  
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eiram21
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Nov 28, 2012 13:32 |  #6

DC Fan wrote in post #15299777 (external link)
The main practical limits with a 300D are the small image buffer which allows only four JPEG images in a row to be exposed, and the highest ISO of 1600, which is low by current standards. Any of the current T-series digital Rebels would be good replacements and would by easy to operate for someone used to a 300D. The only major changes would be batteries (Canon moved away from the BP-511 after this model) and the switch from the 300D's CompactFlash cards and the T-series' Secure Digital cards.

A T3i is reasonably priced, (external link) and its capability to generate images is essentially the same as the other Canon 18MP camera. It's a camera you can comfortably grow into for years before you come anywhere near reaching the camera's limits.

I feel like I'm getting significant noise with an ISO greater than 400 - does that sound right for this camera? When you say 4 images in a row to be processed, you are referring to burst shooting (if that's the right word?) as in when I use for action or sports? I should have been more specific - I am using the camera 99% of the time for food photography, for my website. What are the advantages of the newer batteries and digital cards?

Thanks for the recommendations.


Marie
www.feelingfoodish.com (external link)
Newbie photographer
Gear: Canon 60D with kit lens, Canon 60mm Macro, Canon 50 mm/1.8

  
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eiram21
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Nov 28, 2012 13:34 |  #7

David_MC wrote in post #15299685 (external link)
What lenses do you currently own and are these sporting events indoors or outdoors and are they during the day time or at night.

The only lenses that I have are the one that came with (18-55 mm), a zoom lens (75-300 mm, 1.4 to 5.6), and the 50mm/1.8 that I use most of the time for food shots.

If I took photos of my daughter's swimming it would be indoors under flourescent (?) lighting or in the summer, outdoors in the sunshine.


Marie
www.feelingfoodish.com (external link)
Newbie photographer
Gear: Canon 60D with kit lens, Canon 60mm Macro, Canon 50 mm/1.8

  
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jaomul
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Nov 28, 2012 13:39 |  #8

I suggest a faster lens, such as a tamron 17-50 f2.8 or a 70-200 f2.8 if the longer focal length suits your style. Go for good condition secondhand. If after a while your camera is not quite up to your needs you could then budget for another camera. This should still keep you inside your 1500 budget with a much smaller initial outlay and possibly no need for a second spend should the lenses be enough


flickr (external link)
Olympus EM5,Nikon d7200,
Olympus 12-50mm, 40-150mm,17mm f2.8,Nikon 50mm F1.8, Tamron 90mm vc, 18-105mmVR, Sigma 18-35 f1.8

  
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eiram21
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Nov 28, 2012 13:47 as a reply to  @ eiram21's post |  #9

Another question: Can I get tack sharp photos with a camera under 1.5K?


Marie
www.feelingfoodish.com (external link)
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Gear: Canon 60D with kit lens, Canon 60mm Macro, Canon 50 mm/1.8

  
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eiram21
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Nov 28, 2012 13:48 |  #10

jaomul wrote in post #15300604 (external link)
I suggest a faster lens, such as a tamron 17-50 f2.8 or a 70-200 f2.8 if the longer focal length suits your style. Go for good condition secondhand. If after a while your camera is not quite up to your needs you could then budget for another camera. This should still keep you inside your 1500 budget with a much smaller initial outlay and possibly no need for a second spend should the lenses be enough

Would this lens be better than the 50mm/1.8 in terms of shooting food shots at my kitchen table?


Marie
www.feelingfoodish.com (external link)
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Gear: Canon 60D with kit lens, Canon 60mm Macro, Canon 50 mm/1.8

  
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amfoto1
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Nov 28, 2012 13:54 |  #11

Frames per second rates are of marginal use shooting action... Sure, you might capture some more shots, but you also end up dealing with and trashing a whole lot more images. Timing individual shots or short bursts of shots can be very effective alternative.

That said, following action with autofocus is the other problem. Some of the newer cameras have more sophisticated AF systems than your 300D. However, the camera is only one part of AF performance. Lenses also make a big, big difference. Most Canon's USM lenses are near the top of the game for lens focus speed. Larger aperture lenses that deliver more light for the AF system to work with also tend to help. (There are some exceptions, such as macro lenses and portrait specific lenses, that just aren't designed for speed.)

The third factor in the autofocus performance equation is the user. Learning to use the system well and set up the camera as needed for different purposes is invaluable. For action shots, limit the camera to use only the center AF point, set it to AI Servo and try Back Button Focusing.

While the 300D is a fairly old model now, those 6MP camera make very nice images, up to about ISO 800, and are pretty capable. Depending upon what lenses you have to work with, you might see the most benefit by putting some money into lenses, instead of a new camera. 300D was the first camera that could use EF-S lenses, so there are no limitations and you can choose among all the available Canon lenses, plus a lot of third party offerings. If you have some decent lenses already, you might be better served by upgrading the camera. Any of the current Rebel series would be a real step up, the T4i has some advantages with a better AF system than any previous Rebel/xxxD model. In fact, it's a similar AF system to that used in 40D, 50D or 60D, all of which also would be a very nice upgrade, though a bit larger, heavier. If you move up to one of the xxD models, you'll get considerably higher resolution (10MP with 40D, 15MP with 50d, 18MP with 60D or any of the current Rebel/xxxD except for the most entry-level T3/1100D which is 12MP.)

The later xxD and Rebel models are likely easier on batteries than your 300D/Digital Rebel. My 10D (about the same age as your camera) didn't get as many shots per charge as later cameras. 40D and 50D use the same BP511/511A as your camera, but get more shots per charge out of them... 60D uses a newer LP-E6 that's good for about 40-50% more shots per charge on average. All these models also include self-cleaning sensors (current Rebel series do, too... and it works pretty well a lot of the time). The xxD cameras allow you to swap out the focus screens for a couple different types, while the Rebel-series don't. Also, the xxD camera have a true pentaprism that makes the viewfinder larger and brighter than the penta-mirror based viewfinders in the Rebel series.

40D and 50D use the same type of memory card as your 300D: Compact Flash. The 60D and all the current Rebel series cameras use smaller, SD/SDHC memory cards. You will probably want to buy new memory cards regardless, since the newer, higher resolution cameras generate much bigger image file. Compact Flash are still a little faster than SDHC, but the smaller cards are catching up and coming close.

If you go with a new camera now, I'd suggest you keep it as affordable as possible, to have some budget remaining to put toward lenses. Depending upon what you have now, lenses will likely do more for your images, than the camera used behind them.

It sounds as if you are wanting to expand your skills... I'd suggest setting aside $17 of your budget for a copy of the book "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson (external link). It's very helpful, highly recommended!

EDIT: I see you have added some info about the lenses you have. Those are three of the cheapest Canon lenses has offered. None of them have faster and more accurate (and quieter) USM focusing. The zooms are f3.5 at best and f5.6 aperture at the other extreme... pretty slow. The 18-55 is decent optically (if it's the later, IS version... not if it's the early, non-IS version). The 50/1.8 II is also decent optically, but suffers from slow, noisy, erratic autofocus and low build quality. As a faster f1.8 lens, it helps AF a bit, but still isn't as fast or accurate focusing as a USM lens would be. The 75-300 is thought by many to be one of Canon's least desireable lenses.

You can use all those lenses with a newer camera and might see some improvements in autofocus and image quality, but the lenses might still hold you back pretty dramatically.

You can get "tack sharp" photos with the camera you have now... if it were used with better lenses.

All the following were taken with various lenses on my old 10D... which uses exactly the same image sensor and processor as the 300D/Digital Rebel... :

Canon EF 50mm f1.4 lens

IMAGE: http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3365/5734846250_3fb569d01d_b.jpg

Canon EF 50mm f1.4 lens
IMAGE: http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5142/5734845728_a1cfe3880b_b.jpg

Canon EF 500mm f4 IS lens with Canon EF 1.4X II teleconverter
IMAGE: http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6084/6143927405_605ee6ba58_b.jpg

Canon EF 100mm f2.8 USM Macro
IMAGE: http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6200/6144545244_7d91037999_b.jpg

Canon EF 100mm f2.8 USM Macro
IMAGE: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8028/7314420430_c1be67fea0_b.jpg

Canon EF 70-200/2.8 IS
IMAGE: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8350/8228353946_923d2ab512_z.jpg

Canon EF 100mm f2.8 USM Macro
IMAGE: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8210/8228451336_1961738249_z.jpg

Alan Myers (external link) "Walk softly and carry a big lens."
5DII, 7DII(x2), 7D(x2) & other cameras. 10-22mm, Tokina 12-24/4, 20/2.8, TS 24/3.5L, 24-70/2.8L, 28/1.8, 28-135 IS (x2), TS 45/2.8, 50/1.4, Tamron 60/2.0, 70-200/4L IS, 70-200/2.8 IS, 85/1.8, Tamron 90/2.5 Macro, 100/2.8 USM, 100-400L II, 135/2L, 180/3.5L, 300/4L IS (x2), 300/2.8L IS, 500/4L IS, EF 1.4X II, EF 2X II. Flashes, studio strobes & various access. - FLICKR (external link) - ZENFOLIO (external link)

  
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jaomul
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Nov 28, 2012 13:57 |  #12

eiram21 wrote in post #15300647 (external link)
Would this lens be better than the 50mm/1.8 in terms of shooting food shots at my kitchen table?

No .


flickr (external link)
Olympus EM5,Nikon d7200,
Olympus 12-50mm, 40-150mm,17mm f2.8,Nikon 50mm F1.8, Tamron 90mm vc, 18-105mmVR, Sigma 18-35 f1.8

  
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gonzogolf
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Nov 28, 2012 13:59 |  #13

eiram21 wrote in post #15300579 (external link)
The only lenses that I have are the one that came with (18-55 mm), a zoom lens (75-300 mm, 1.4 to 5.6), and the 50mm/1.8 that I use most of the time for food shots.

If I took photos of my daughter's swimming it would be indoors under flourescent (?) lighting or in the summer, outdoors in the sunshine.

Unfortunately the zoom lenses you have, the orignal 18-55 and the 75-300 are among canon's worst. The newer 18-55 kit lens is much improved, and if you want a longer zoom look at the 55-250, both are relative bargains and plentiful in the used market. Indoor swimming is going to be tough with any lens in your price range, but you might want to consider a longer fast prime like the 85 1.8 or renting a 135L.




  
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evilr00t
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Nov 28, 2012 14:13 |  #14

gonzogolf wrote in post #15300686 (external link)
Unfortunately the zoom lenses you have, the orignal 18-55 and the 75-300 are among canon's worst. The newer 18-55 kit lens is much improved, and if you want a longer zoom look at the 55-250, both are relative bargains and plentiful in the used market. Indoor swimming is going to be tough with any lens in your price range, but you might want to consider a longer fast prime like the 85 1.8 or renting a 135L.

^ 85/1.8 highly recommended.


XTi, 1D3, 2x SB-28, 580EX, 550EX, Tamron 28-75, 50/1.8, "EF" 18-55 II, "EF" 18-55 IS, 85/1.8, 75-300 III USM, 70-200/4L

  
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1ds4Me
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Nov 28, 2012 15:26 |  #15

eiram21 wrote in post #15300537 (external link)
Is DR "dynamic range"? I'm trying to learn more about PP using Lightroom. There is sooo much to learn.
I am really only looking for those 1 or 2 keepers when it comes to action shots, I guess. I'm just having a hard time justifying the expense at this point considering that I haven't mastered this ole thing yet! I'm using it 99% of the time for food blogging, taking those still shot photos in low light (my house isn't very sunny) Would LOVE to get tack sharp photos but haven't had luck yet. Using 50mm/1.8 lens most of the time.

Just finished shooting some soup photos and was so excited to view them. Then I realized the camera card wasn't in the camera!! This has happened so many times. Another reason I want a new camera. Don't the newer ones record right to the camera?

Errr...the camera you recommended looks like it's selling for 5K? Maybe I misunderstood? http://www.amazon.com …creativeASIN%3D​B0001G112O (external link)

Thanks for your input.

Yes, DR is dynamic range. Also, make ebay your best friend or Craigslist. You'll find the 1DMKII around $500-800.




  
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