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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 04 Dec 2012 (Tuesday) 12:48
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How can I fake Large soft natrual light in a large office?

 
jonas18z
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Dec 04, 2012 12:48 |  #1

I have a office that's about 300 m2. There is window on one side with dayligh but I need more natural daylight. I want take wide angel pictures and close up's also with some people and everything should have "natural light" look.

Some example
http://www.yatzer.com …laudia_Uribe_ya​tzer_5.jpg (external link)
http://modernoctopus.c​om …fice-Hangzhou-China01.jpg (external link)
http://www.gettyimages​.se …-royaltyfri-bild/85406916 (external link)
What is the best lights, flashes, HMI or mixed?

How do I achieve this light?




  
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dmward
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Dec 04, 2012 12:54 |  #2

Your links don't work.

Until we can see your examples it will be hard to make suggestions.


David | Sharing my Insights, Knowledge & Experience (external link) | dmwfotos website (external link)

  
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doidinho
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Dec 04, 2012 12:59 |  #3

Bounce a couple of flashes into the walls or ceilings. A couple of well placed flashes into a white wall should do the trick nicely. Make sure and gel the flashes to match the daylight.


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jonas18z
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Dec 04, 2012 12:59 |  #4

Sorry, fixed the links




  
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dmward
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Dec 04, 2012 13:07 |  #5

As Robert said, judicious use of flash, camera on tripod, some careful tone control in Lightroom. (Not HDR, just highlights, shadows, whites and blacks. Along with exposure, contrast and clarity.)


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jonas18z
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Dec 04, 2012 13:13 |  #6

There will be people in the pictures in some pictures
I did some shoot with a smaller office 30-40m2 and only one flash 2400ws bounched in the wall. but you could "feel" the studio light in the picture.

But I didn't try with gels is this the secret?




  
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dmward
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Dec 04, 2012 13:26 |  #7

The goal of the strobe is to add light to fill in the shadows and darker areas, not to over power the ambient. 2400Ws is probably too much. There is an eBook written by Scott Hargis called Light Interiors where is describes his approach. It focuses on house interiors but he does have some suggestions about office space as well.

There is also some stuff on his blog.

Gels are useful for balancing strobes, incandescent and daylight, but if the color balance isn't way off that may be more trouble than its worth. Shoot a color checker to help get color balance right.


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jcolman
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Dec 04, 2012 13:28 |  #8

jonas18z wrote in post #15325623 (external link)
There will be people in the pictures in some pictures
I did some shoot with a smaller office 30-40m2 and only one flash 2400ws bounched in the wall. but you could "feel" the studio light in the picture.

But I didn't try with gels is this the secret?

Your light needs to match the ambient light. If the ambient is daylight, then your flash should match. If the ambient is tungsten, then you need to add some CTO gel to your light to lower the color temp.

The easiest way to get natural looking softlight is to bounce your light off of 4' x 8' white foam core. You can pick up large sheets of foam core at most art supply shops. Bouncing off of foam core instead of walls is preferred because you can place the foam core where it will do the most good. You can easily clamp foam core to light stands or C-stands.


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doidinho
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Dec 04, 2012 18:18 |  #9

jonas18z wrote in post #15325623 (external link)
There will be people in the pictures in some pictures
I did some shoot with a smaller office 30-40m2 and only one flash 2400ws bounched in the wall. but you could "feel" the studio light in the picture.

But I didn't try with gels is this the secret?

The gels will deffinately help. Window light is close to the temp of overcast light and flash is close to the temp of direct sun on a clear day, so without gelling the flash there will be a difference in color temp.

I have a feeling that the "secret" in your case though is going to be to use more flashes at a lower output setting. You want to maximize the size of the light source to get a soft even fill.


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dmward
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Dec 04, 2012 18:28 |  #10

Even is you can't find a convenient wall to bounce from. You can always tape sheets of foam core or even background paper along a wall or between light stands and then place lights along the length to create the lighting you want.

For this kind of shoot 9 or 10 speedlites are probably more useful than 2 or three monolights or a pack with a couple of heads.


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MrScott
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Dec 04, 2012 19:59 |  #11

Rob has a semi-portable rigid DIY panel on his blog... Humf, sure miss the old fart.
http://thelightingacad​emy.com …ch-white-reflector-panel/ (external link)

I've also seen a blog or two about sheet covered doorways with big wattage on the other side...




  
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jcolman
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Dec 05, 2012 12:58 |  #12

dmward wrote in post #15326948 (external link)
Even is you can't find a convenient wall to bounce from. You can always tape sheets of foam core or even background paper along a wall or between light stands and then place lights along the length to create the lighting you want.

For this kind of shoot 9 or 10 speedlites are probably more useful than 2 or three monolights or a pack with a couple of heads.

I have to disagree with this David. I worked for years in the video industry, doing exactly this type of lighting. I found that 1 or 2 large light sources, bounced off of foam core worked better than using more smaller light sources.

For starters, more lights, means more light stands. Keeping things simple was key to getting the shots completed in a timely manner.

Second, even though you are bouncing your flash off of foam core, less lights means less shadows/spill light to deal with. It's easy to flag a single light if you have unwanted light spill. Not so easy to flag multiple lights.


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dmward
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Dec 05, 2012 16:58 |  #13

jcolman wrote in post #15329836 (external link)
I have to disagree with this David. I worked for years in the video industry, doing exactly this type of lighting. I found that 1 or 2 large light sources, bounced off of foam core worked better than using more smaller light sources.

For starters, more lights, means more light stands. Keeping things simple was key to getting the shots completed in a timely manner.

Second, even though you are bouncing your flash off of foam core, less lights means less shadows/spill light to deal with. It's easy to flag a single light if you have unwanted light spill. Not so easy to flag multiple lights.

If the purpose is to provide the predominate light I agree.
If the idea is to add bits of light to enhance the ambient then I think the smaller lights offer more flexibility. For sure fewer sources mean less complicated shadows etc.


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How can I fake Large soft natrual light in a large office?
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