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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 20 Dec 2012 (Thursday) 01:22
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Time-lapse shooting in cold weather

 
matt847
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Dec 20, 2012 01:22 |  #1

I am going to start experimenting with some time-lapsing with my t3i and I had a question about weather. I am wanting to try a sunrise and I'll have it set up for 3 hours or so. If the temp is around 20 degrees F, is that OK to leave my camera outside that long? I've heard after shooting in the cold for a long time, condensation can build up when you bring the camera inside. Any tips on how to avoid this? Thanks!




  
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mikeassk
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Dec 20, 2012 01:27 |  #2

Never done it but have heard about hand warmers... and tons of little tricks.

About Bringing your camera inside, youll need to put it in a camera bag. It will acclimate in there for a while fine.


Stuff

  
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xhack
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Dec 20, 2012 01:32 |  #3

Just plastic bag the camera before bringing it indoors, and leave it in the bag to 'acclimatise' for 15-20 minutes. If there's little temperature gradient between camera and ambient, condensation will not form.

Of more immediate import is battery efficiency after three hours at 20ºF. You may have the swap over batteries quite often to maintain efficiency, which will likely compromise camera alignment. An external insulated battery pack would be an option, but I'm guessing that's not readily available.


~ Wallace
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DoctorLove
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Dec 21, 2012 07:21 |  #4

If I were to experiment with that and just to be on the safe side, after taking pics, I will leave it in the car (without the heat on) and then gradually bring it indoors few hrs later.




  
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Brasher
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Dec 21, 2012 07:28 as a reply to  @ DoctorLove's post |  #5

Lowest I've personally seen a Canon camera operate was -40F. A 20D in the Alaskan winter. Not an issue.

Like someone mentioned already, your batteries will run out much quicker. Bring plenty of spares, or better yet, a power adapter if you'll have access to electricity.




  
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-MasterChief-
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Dec 21, 2012 07:34 |  #6

you need a 1DX :p .... check this out

http://gizmodo.com …ed-this-is-what-they-mean (external link)




  
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John ­ from ­ PA
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Dec 21, 2012 08:22 |  #7

As a solution to the cold temperature effect on the batteries, I've used those chemical hand/foot warmer bags you can buy at most sporting goods stores. They will typically last about 4 hours. Once the camera is set up provide some reasonable "wrapping" around everything except for the lens. The nice thing abut the bags is the chemical reaction is designed to not get too hot and burn skin or be uncomfortable, thus not likely to harm anything related to the camera.




  
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archer1960
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Dec 21, 2012 08:34 |  #8

Won't hurt the camera a bit (I use my T1i all winter for astrophotography), but as others say, you want to try to keep condensation off it when you bring it back indoors. I just leave it in the (sealed) case when I bring it in the house, and take it out the next morning to pull out the batteries for a recharge. As for battery life, I've found that a grip with a 2nd lithium battery will get me several hours of shooting even at 10F temperatures.


Gripped 7D, gripped, full-spectrum modfied T1i (500D), SX50HS, A2E film body, Tamzooka (150-600), Tamron 90mm/2.8 VC (ver 2), Tamron 18-270 VC, Canon FD 100 f/4.0 macro, Canon 24-105 f/4L,Canon EF 200 f/2.8LII, Canon 85 f/1.8, Tamron Adaptall 2 90mmf/2.5 Macro, Tokina 11-16, Canon EX-430 flash, Vivitar DF-383 flash, Astro-Tech AT6RC and Celestron NexStar 102 GT telescopes, various other semi-crappy manual lenses and stuff.

  
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paddler4
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Dec 21, 2012 08:34 |  #9

Normally, you get condensation when you bring a cold object into a warm environment, like when you bring your camera back indoors. However, you can also get condensation while the camera is at a stable temperature outdoors, if the temperature drops below the dew point. It has happened to me on night shoots. Shouldn't be a problem at that temperature, but check the weather.


Check out my photos at http://dkoretz.smugmug​.com (external link)

  
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archer1960
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Dec 21, 2012 10:13 |  #10

You obviously won't get dew, but you can get frost by the same mechanism. I got a lot of frost on my camera body and a little on the lens shooting the geminids the other week.


Gripped 7D, gripped, full-spectrum modfied T1i (500D), SX50HS, A2E film body, Tamzooka (150-600), Tamron 90mm/2.8 VC (ver 2), Tamron 18-270 VC, Canon FD 100 f/4.0 macro, Canon 24-105 f/4L,Canon EF 200 f/2.8LII, Canon 85 f/1.8, Tamron Adaptall 2 90mmf/2.5 Macro, Tokina 11-16, Canon EX-430 flash, Vivitar DF-383 flash, Astro-Tech AT6RC and Celestron NexStar 102 GT telescopes, various other semi-crappy manual lenses and stuff.

  
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Harleypugs
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Dec 21, 2012 10:18 |  #11

http://blog.planet5d.c​om …-extreme-weather-project/ (external link)


5dMKIII/grip - 24-105 4.0 IS - 70-200 2.8 IS MKII - 60D/grip - 580 EX II - G9

  
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MintMark
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Dec 21, 2012 10:36 as a reply to  @ paddler4's post |  #12

It depends on your lens, but I have found that as temperature changes the focus of a lens can be affected. When I take pictures of the stars I find have to refocus now and again as the temperature falls... I think letting your lens get to ambient temperature before you start shooting will help.


Mark

  
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archer1960
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Dec 21, 2012 10:42 |  #13

MintMark wrote in post #15393399 (external link)
It depends on your lens, but I have found that as temperature changes the focus of a lens can be affected. When I take pictures of the stars I find have to refocus now and again as the temperature falls... I think letting your lens get to ambient temperature before you start shooting will help.

Definitely a factor at long focal lengths. With my 11-16, everything beyond 20 ft is in focus no matter what the temperature does.


Gripped 7D, gripped, full-spectrum modfied T1i (500D), SX50HS, A2E film body, Tamzooka (150-600), Tamron 90mm/2.8 VC (ver 2), Tamron 18-270 VC, Canon FD 100 f/4.0 macro, Canon 24-105 f/4L,Canon EF 200 f/2.8LII, Canon 85 f/1.8, Tamron Adaptall 2 90mmf/2.5 Macro, Tokina 11-16, Canon EX-430 flash, Vivitar DF-383 flash, Astro-Tech AT6RC and Celestron NexStar 102 GT telescopes, various other semi-crappy manual lenses and stuff.

  
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Time-lapse shooting in cold weather
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