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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 25 Dec 2012 (Tuesday) 22:07
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Canon EF 70-200mm f/4 L USM

 
ColbyL
Member
52 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Dec 2012
     
Dec 25, 2012 22:07 |  #1

I just recently got a Canon EF 70-200mm f/4 L USM (non-IS) lens and am needing some help on how to work this lens. I am completely stumped on how to work this lens. I originally got this lens to take photos of wildlife, nature, action and low light photography. I also needed a high quality zoom lens. However, I cannot figure out how to use this lens with the camera that I have (T2i).

Here's what I'm needing help with too:

This lens is an action lens but how am I suppose to take action photos with this lens? I tried to take a couple action photos today but they turned out very blurry. Am I suppose to set the Sports mode on the T2i when I take a photo with this lens? How am I suppose to set the lens to where I can take action photos?

I also went out tonight to try to take photos in low light, most turned out pretty crisp but when I tried to take a picture of the Christmas lights, the photos turned out very blurry and overly lighted.

I am hoping to go to the zoo soon to take photos of the animal there and from what I've heard, you can zoom up to the animals and some how make the bar cages that the animals are kept in disappear and only capture the animal and not have the annoying bars in the way. How can this be done?

I've heard that you can take photos/videos that are crisp clear of the moon on a very clear night with this lens. How can I do this? How do I crop the video/photo to take a video/photo of the moon?

What is the focus ring used for? Am I suppose to use that focus ring and if so, on what mode (AF or MF)?

Basically, I'm needing to know anything and everything that any of you know about this lens and how to work this lens because I have no idea how to.

This lens is a HUGE step up from the lens that I've been using for over a year (18-55mm) so I'm needing as much help as I can get.

I would really appreciate all of the information that you can provide me with on how to use this lens and even some tips and tricks to using this lens. All help is very appreciated.

Thank you!




  
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drzenitram
Senior Member
824 posts
Joined Aug 2012
     
Dec 25, 2012 23:58 |  #2

ColbyL wrote in post #15407412 (external link)
I just recently got a Canon EF 70-200mm f/4 L USM (non-IS) lens and am needing some help on how to work this lens. I am completely stumped on how to work this lens. I originally got this lens to take photos of wildlife, nature, action and low light photography. I also needed a high quality zoom lens. However, I cannot figure out how to use this lens with the camera that I have (T2i).

Here's what I'm needing help with too:

This lens is an action lens but how am I suppose to take action photos with this lens? I tried to take a couple action photos today but they turned out very blurry. Am I suppose to set the Sports mode on the T2i when I take a photo with this lens? How am I suppose to set the lens to where I can take action photos?

I also went out tonight to try to take photos in low light, most turned out pretty crisp but when I tried to take a picture of the Christmas lights, the photos turned out very blurry and overly lighted.

I am hoping to go to the zoo soon to take photos of the animal there and from what I've heard, you can zoom up to the animals and some how make the bar cages that the animals are kept in disappear and only capture the animal and not have the annoying bars in the way. How can this be done?

I've heard that you can take photos/videos that are crisp clear of the moon on a very clear night with this lens. How can I do this? How do I crop the video/photo to take a video/photo of the moon?

What is the focus ring used for? Am I suppose to use that focus ring and if so, on what mode (AF or MF)?

Basically, I'm needing to know anything and everything that any of you know about this lens and how to work this lens because I have no idea how to.

This lens is a HUGE step up from the lens that I've been using for over a year (18-55mm) so I'm needing as much help as I can get.

I would really appreciate all of the information that you can provide me with on how to use this lens and even some tips and tricks to using this lens. All help is very appreciated.

Thank you!


Alllllright Colby, where do we begin?!

For starters, I have to say that you've got some reading to do! The world of photography is vast and there's so much to learn that you'll never stop learning, but a good place to start is by understanding that photography is all about light. Your "shutter speed", "f stop(or aperture)", and "ISO" are the trifecta that need to become second nature to you.

Forgive me if I'm telling you what you already know, but it's always good just to have a refresher.

Start by shooting in M(manual), Av(Aperture Priority), or Tv(Shutter Priority) to give you more control of your camera.

~Shutter speed
-This is how long the sensor is exposed to the light coming in through your lens.
-The longer your sensor is exposed to the light, the more light it takes in(1 second<more light> vs 1/10 second<less light>;).
-Faster shutter speeds freeze movement, including camera shake(from hand movements, the mirror slapping down inside the camera, wind blowing, etc.).
-Slower shutter speeds do not freeze movement, and can result in blurry shots(and also artistic representations such as smooth water and star trails).
-Unless using a tripod or a lens with Image Stabilization(also known as IS, OS, VC, Optical Stabilization, Vibration Compensation), shutter speed should be at least 1/<focal length> to avoid camera shake. For example, if shooting with your lens set @ 200mm, use at least 1/200th shutter speed or faster, such as 1/400 or 1/1000. If shooting with your lens set to 50mm use at least 1/50 shutter speed. If shooting on a crop body(like your t2i), multiply this times the crop factor(1.6) so a 200mm lens should be shot at a minimum of 1/320 to avoid camera shake.
-Image Stabilization/OS/VC allows for a reduction in that recommended shutter speed. 2 stops of IS means that you can take that 1/320 @ 200mm and cut it in half 2 times. One stop of IS would be down to 1/160, 2 stops lowers that to 1/80th.
*Recommended shutter speeds:
*-Still objects: 1/focal length+ or IS reduced shutter speed
*-Portraits: 1/60+ for a mostly still subject
*-Sports: 1/640+ for running sports, 1/1000+ for cars/airplanes
*-Wildlife: 1/200+
*-Landscapes: Depends!


Since you want to be shooting action, you should aim for a fast shutter speed. My guess is that you were shooting at too slow a shutter speed and that resulted in blurry photos because your subject was moving too fast for the shutter speed you used.

In order to get a faster shutter speed, you can do one of three things:

1. Get more light!(Use a flash, shoot during daylight, turn on more lights)

2. Lower your fstop(aka widen your aperture), which lets in more light because of the wider opening, if shooting at f5.6, lower your fstop to f4(which is called wide open). The reason some lenses are so expensive is because they allow for very wide apertures like f1.4(prime lenses) or f2.8(zoom lenses). Every 3 "clicks" of your aperture value is 1 stop, they go as follows(the bold are "full stops"): 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 2.2 2.5 2.8 3.2 3.5 4 4.5 5.0 5.6 6.3 7.1 8 9 10 11 13 14 16 18 20 22. One full stop widening of aperture is equal to letting in twice as much light. The change from f5.6 to f4 would allow your shutter speed to go from 1/30 to 1/60th. Usually lenses are sharper when they are "stopped down"(which means that the aperture is set narrower than "wide open"), so, while for artistic purposes you may frequently want to use lenses wide open, it's usually best to revert to #1(more light).

3. Raise your ISO(Sensitivity of the sensor to light... sort of). If your ISO is at 100, ISO 200 will let in twice as much light(and double your shutter speed from say... 1/30 to 1/60.) From ISO 100 to ISO 1600 you would let in 16 times more light. Your shutter speed would go, for example, from 1/30 to 1/500. However, increasing ISO will introduce some noise into your photos. Sometimes this is unavoidable, but if possible it's always best to revert to #1(more light).

_______________

For the Christmas light photos, you may want to try lowering the exposure(Ev).

_______________

In order to blur out the bars at the zoo, you'll need to be fairly close to the bars and your subject will need to be a good distance away from the bars. You'll want to use a longer focal length(like 200mm) and a wide aperture(like f4). This will make a narrow "depth of field" that you can focus on your subject and will not include the bars.

_______________

To take a photo of the moon I would definitely recommend using a tripod! Try different settings on your camera to see what you like, but I would recommend first trying something like ISO 100, f8, 10 second shutter speed, 200mm. Go from there!

_______________

The focus ring is very useful. On the 70-200 f4 L you have full time manual focusing. That means that even when the lens is set to autofocus, you can still change the focus even after the autofocus has selected a target. This is useful in situations like taking pictures at the zoo where you may be trying to focus on an animal, but your camera chooses to focus on the bars or chain in front of the animal. You can then adjust the focus manually using the focus ring and still get your picture. You can also use the focus ring when the lens is set to Manual Focus.

_______________

The 70-200 f4 L is a very capable lens, and can deliver some really incredible photos. The T2i is also a great camera, it has canon's highest quality crop(1.6) sensor, the same one used in their 7D, and can create beautiful images.

With a little practice shooting, and a bit of reading, you'll be making beautiful photos of your own in no time.

_______________
I hope this answered some of your questions and didn't confuse you too much. Welcome to the forums, and Merry Christmas!


| Bodies - 5D Mark II, T2i | Lenses - Helios 44-2, Sigma 35mm 1.4, Sigma 85 1.4, Sigma 70-200 2.8 OS, Tamron SP AF 1.4x TC | Lights - 430ex ii x2, Random 3rd party strobes

  
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-dave-m-
Senior Member
493 posts
Gallery: 6 photos
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Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
     
Dec 26, 2012 00:05 |  #3

ColbyL wrote in post #15407412 (external link)
I just recently got a Canon EF 70-200mm f/4 L USM (non-IS) lens and am needing some help on how to work this lens. I am completely stumped on how to work this lens. I originally got this lens to take photos of wildlife, nature, action and low light photography. I also needed a high quality zoom lens. However, I cannot figure out how to use this lens with the camera that I have (T2i).

Here's what I'm needing help with too:

This lens is an action lens but how am I suppose to take action photos with this lens? I tried to take a couple action photos today but they turned out very blurry. Am I suppose to set the Sports mode on the T2i when I take a photo with this lens? How am I suppose to set the lens to where I can take action photos?

Your blurry photos are most likely due to camera shake from slow shutter speed. Without IS you will need a faster shutter speed to get sharp photo's. Depending on how steady you are you will most likely need 1/200 or faster at 200mm. You may want to shoot in Tv and experiment with shutter speed to see what works best for you. A good estimate is to start at a shutter speed of 1/focal length. For example if you are zoomed to 200mm set shutter speed to 1/200. If your pictures are still blurry try a faster shutter speed.

I also went out tonight to try to take photos in low light, most turned out pretty crisp but when I tried to take a picture of the Christmas lights, the photos turned out very blurry and overly lighted.

Again, I would suspect camera shake from slow shutter speed. I wouldn't even bother trying to capture Christmas Lights with this lens unless I had a tripod.

I am hoping to go to the zoo soon to take photos of the animal there and from what I've heard, you can zoom up to the animals and some how make the bar cages that the animals are kept in disappear and only capture the animal and not have the annoying bars in the way. How can this be done?

Blurring out the cages is a function of depth of field. By stopping the aperature down you decrease the depth of field and the cage will seem to disappear. You could try shooting in Av and set the aperature to 4.0 or 5.6

I've heard that you can take photos/videos that are crisp clear of the moon on a very clear night with this lens. How can I do this? How do I crop the video/photo to take a video/photo of the moon?

The moon is a very bright object, but can be difficult. I usually take moon shots in manual. I usually start with aperature around f11, iso 400 and adjust shutter speed for proper exposure. If I'm using a tripod I will use iso 100 and a slower shutter speed.

What is the focus ring used for? Am I suppose to use that focus ring and if so, on what mode (AF or MF)?

The focus ring is used for just that, focusing. You do not need to use the focus ring. There are circumstances where manual focus can be very useful. For the most part the only time I use manual focus is wjen shooting in Live View and using a tripod. You can use the LCD screen and zoom in to get sharp focus.

Basically, I'm needing to know anything and everything that any of you know about this lens and how to work this lens because I have no idea how to.

This lens is a HUGE step up from the lens that I've been using for over a year (18-55mm) so I'm needing as much help as I can get.

I would really appreciate all of the information that you can provide me with on how to use this lens and even some tips and tricks to using this lens. All help is very appreciated.

Thank you!

I would mainly suggest you practice shooting and learn how to use all the different settings and when they are useful.


5D MkII Gripped | 7D MkII Gripped | 200 f/2.8L | 17-40 f/4L | Σ 24-105 OS f/4 Art | Σ 50 f/1.4 Art | Σ 150-600 OS f/5-6.3 C | 430EX II

  
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ColbyL
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
52 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Dec 2012
     
Dec 26, 2012 00:06 |  #4

drzenitram wrote in post #15407680 (external link)
Alllllright Colby, where do we begin?!

For starters, I have to say that you've got some reading to do! The world of photography is vast and there's so much to learn that you'll never stop learning, but a good place to start is by understanding that photography is all about light. Your "shutter speed", "f stop(or aperture)", and "ISO" are the trifecta that need to become second nature to you.

Forgive me if I'm telling you what you already know, but it's always good just to have a refresher.

Start by shooting in M(manual), Av(Aperture Priority), or Tv(Shutter Priority) to give you more control of your camera.

~Shutter speed
-This is how long the sensor is exposed to the light coming in through your lens.
-The longer your sensor is exposed to the light, the more light it takes in(1 second<more light> vs 1/10 second<less light>;).
-Faster shutter speeds freeze movement, including camera shake(from hand movements, the mirror slapping down inside the camera, wind blowing, etc.).
-Slower shutter speeds do not freeze movement, and can result in blurry shots(and also artistic representations such as smooth water and star trails).
-Unless using a tripod or a lens with Image Stabilization(also known as IS, OS, VC, Optical Stabilization, Vibration Compensation), shutter speed should be at least 1/<focal length> to avoid camera shake. For example, if shooting with your lens set @ 200mm, use at least 1/200th shutter speed or faster, such as 1/400 or 1/1000. If shooting with your lens set to 50mm use at least 1/50 shutter speed. If shooting on a crop body(like your t2i), multiply this times the crop factor(1.6) so a 200mm lens should be shot at a minimum of 1/320 to avoid camera shake.
-Image Stabilization/OS/VC allows for a reduction in that recommended shutter speed. 2 stops of IS means that you can take that 1/320 @ 200mm and cut it in half 2 times. One stop of IS would be down to 1/160, 2 stops lowers that to 1/80th.
*Recommended shutter speeds:
*-Still objects: 1/focal length+ or IS reduced shutter speed
*-Portraits: 1/60+ for a mostly still subject
*-Sports: 1/640+ for running sports, 1/1000+ for cars/airplanes
*-Wildlife: 1/200+
*-Landscapes: Depends!


Since you want to be shooting action, you should aim for a fast shutter speed. My guess is that you were shooting at too slow a shutter speed and that resulted in blurry photos because your subject was moving too fast for the shutter speed you used.

In order to get a faster shutter speed, you can do one of three things:

1. Get more light!(Use a flash, shoot during daylight, turn on more lights)

2. Lower your fstop(aka widen your aperture), which lets in more light because of the wider opening, if shooting at f5.6, lower your fstop to f4(which is called wide open). The reason some lenses are so expensive is because they allow for very wide apertures like f1.4(prime lenses) or f2.8(zoom lenses). Every 3 "clicks" of your aperture value is 1 stop, they go as follows(the bold are "full stops"): 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 2.2 2.5 2.8 3.2 3.5 4 4.5 5.0 5.6 6.3 7.1 8 9 10 11 13 14 16 18 20 22. One full stop widening of aperture is equal to letting in twice as much light. The change from f5.6 to f4 would allow your shutter speed to go from 1/30 to 1/60th. Usually lenses are sharper when they are "stopped down"(which means that the aperture is set narrower than "wide open"), so, while for artistic purposes you may frequently want to use lenses wide open, it's usually best to revert to #1(more light).

3. Raise your ISO(Sensitivity of the sensor to light... sort of). If your ISO is at 100, ISO 200 will let in twice as much light(and double your shutter speed from say... 1/30 to 1/60.) From ISO 100 to ISO 1600 you would let in 16 times more light. Your shutter speed would go, for example, from 1/30 to 1/500. However, increasing ISO will introduce some noise into your photos. Sometimes this is unavoidable, but if possible it's always best to revert to #1(more light).

_______________

For the Christmas light photos, you may want to try lowering the exposure(Ev).

_______________

In order to blur out the bars at the zoo, you'll need to be fairly close to the bars and your subject will need to be a good distance away from the bars. You'll want to use a longer focal length(like 200mm) and a wide aperture(like f4). This will make a narrow "depth of field" that you can focus on your subject and will not include the bars.

_______________

To take a photo of the moon I would definitely recommend using a tripod! Try different settings on your camera to see what you like, but I would recommend first trying something like ISO 100, f4, 10 second shutter speed, 200mm. Go from there!

_______________

The focus ring is very useful. On the 70-200 f4 L you have full time manual focusing. That means that even when the lens is set to autofocus, you can still change the focus even after the autofocus has selected a target. This is useful in situations like taking pictures at the zoo where you may be trying to focus on an animal, but your camera chooses to focus on the bars or chain in front of the animal. You can then adjust the focus manually using the focus ring and still get your picture. You can also use the focus ring when the lens is set to Manual Focus.

_______________

The 70-200 f4 L is a very capable lens, and can deliver some really incredible photos. The T2i is also a great camera, it has canon's highest quality crop(1.6) sensor, the same one used in their 7D, and can create beautiful images.

With a little practice shooting, and a bit of reading, you'll be making beautiful photos of your own in no time.

_______________
I hope this answered some of your questions and didn't confuse you too much. Welcome to the forums, and Merry Christmas!


Thank you very much for all of the information, I appreciate it very much. However, how do I change my shutter speed, lower my fstop, raise my ISO, change my aperture, etc? I'm not sure on how to do any of this.




  
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drzenitram
Senior Member
824 posts
Joined Aug 2012
     
Dec 26, 2012 00:08 |  #5

ColbyL wrote in post #15407696 (external link)
Thank you very much for all of the information, I appreciate it very much. However, how do I change my shutter speed, lower my fstop, raise my ISO, etc? I'm not sure on how to do any of this.

For that kind of thing, check out your camera manual. I would read through it a couple times if I were you, then just play with your camera!


| Bodies - 5D Mark II, T2i | Lenses - Helios 44-2, Sigma 35mm 1.4, Sigma 85 1.4, Sigma 70-200 2.8 OS, Tamron SP AF 1.4x TC | Lights - 430ex ii x2, Random 3rd party strobes

  
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lucasmcd
Senior Member
Avatar
335 posts
Joined Aug 2010
Location: Melbourne Australia
     
Dec 26, 2012 00:29 |  #6

drzenitram wrote in post #15407680 (external link)
Alllllright Colby, where do we begin?!

For starters, I have to say that you've got some reading to do! The world of photography is vast and there's so much to learn that you'll never stop learning, but a good place to start is by understanding that photography is all about light. Your "shutter speed", "f stop(or aperture)", and "ISO" are the trifecta that need to become second nature to you.

Forgive me if I'm telling you what you already know, but it's always good just to have a refresher.

Start by shooting in M(manual), Av(Aperture Priority), or Tv(Shutter Priority) to give you more control of your camera.

~Shutter speed
-This is how long the sensor is exposed to the light coming in through your lens.
-The longer your sensor is exposed to the light, the more light it takes in(1 second<more light> vs 1/10 second<less light>;).
-Faster shutter speeds freeze movement, including camera shake(from hand movements, the mirror slapping down inside the camera, wind blowing, etc.).
-Slower shutter speeds do not freeze movement, and can result in blurry shots(and also artistic representations such as smooth water and star trails).
-Unless using a tripod or a lens with Image Stabilization(also known as IS, OS, VC, Optical Stabilization, Vibration Compensation), shutter speed should be at least 1/<focal length> to avoid camera shake. For example, if shooting with your lens set @ 200mm, use at least 1/200th shutter speed or faster, such as 1/400 or 1/1000. If shooting with your lens set to 50mm use at least 1/50 shutter speed. If shooting on a crop body(like your t2i), multiply this times the crop factor(1.6) so a 200mm lens should be shot at a minimum of 1/320 to avoid camera shake.
-Image Stabilization/OS/VC allows for a reduction in that recommended shutter speed. 2 stops of IS means that you can take that 1/320 @ 200mm and cut it in half 2 times. One stop of IS would be down to 1/160, 2 stops lowers that to 1/80th.
*Recommended shutter speeds:
*-Still objects: 1/focal length+ or IS reduced shutter speed
*-Portraits: 1/60+ for a mostly still subject
*-Sports: 1/640+ for running sports, 1/1000+ for cars/airplanes
*-Wildlife: 1/200+
*-Landscapes: Depends!


Since you want to be shooting action, you should aim for a fast shutter speed. My guess is that you were shooting at too slow a shutter speed and that resulted in blurry photos because your subject was moving too fast for the shutter speed you used.

In order to get a faster shutter speed, you can do one of three things:

1. Get more light!(Use a flash, shoot during daylight, turn on more lights)

2. Lower your fstop(aka widen your aperture), which lets in more light because of the wider opening, if shooting at f5.6, lower your fstop to f4(which is called wide open). The reason some lenses are so expensive is because they allow for very wide apertures like f1.4(prime lenses) or f2.8(zoom lenses). Every 3 "clicks" of your aperture value is 1 stop, they go as follows(the bold are "full stops"): 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 2.2 2.5 2.8 3.2 3.5 4 4.5 5.0 5.6 6.3 7.1 8 9 10 11 13 14 16 18 20 22. One full stop widening of aperture is equal to letting in twice as much light. The change from f5.6 to f4 would allow your shutter speed to go from 1/30 to 1/60th. Usually lenses are sharper when they are "stopped down"(which means that the aperture is set narrower than "wide open"), so, while for artistic purposes you may frequently want to use lenses wide open, it's usually best to revert to #1(more light).

3. Raise your ISO(Sensitivity of the sensor to light... sort of). If your ISO is at 100, ISO 200 will let in twice as much light(and double your shutter speed from say... 1/30 to 1/60.) From ISO 100 to ISO 1600 you would let in 16 times more light. Your shutter speed would go, for example, from 1/30 to 1/500. However, increasing ISO will introduce some noise into your photos. Sometimes this is unavoidable, but if possible it's always best to revert to #1(more light).

_______________

For the Christmas light photos, you may want to try lowering the exposure(Ev).

_______________

In order to blur out the bars at the zoo, you'll need to be fairly close to the bars and your subject will need to be a good distance away from the bars. You'll want to use a longer focal length(like 200mm) and a wide aperture(like f4). This will make a narrow "depth of field" that you can focus on your subject and will not include the bars.

_______________

To take a photo of the moon I would definitely recommend using a tripod! Try different settings on your camera to see what you like, but I would recommend first trying something like ISO 100, f8, 10 second shutter speed, 200mm. Go from there!

_______________

The focus ring is very useful. On the 70-200 f4 L you have full time manual focusing. That means that even when the lens is set to autofocus, you can still change the focus even after the autofocus has selected a target. This is useful in situations like taking pictures at the zoo where you may be trying to focus on an animal, but your camera chooses to focus on the bars or chain in front of the animal. You can then adjust the focus manually using the focus ring and still get your picture. You can also use the focus ring when the lens is set to Manual Focus.

_______________

The 70-200 f4 L is a very capable lens, and can deliver some really incredible photos. The T2i is also a great camera, it has canon's highest quality crop(1.6) sensor, the same one used in their 7D, and can create beautiful images.

With a little practice shooting, and a bit of reading, you'll be making beautiful photos of your own in no time.

_______________
I hope this answered some of your questions and didn't confuse you too much. Welcome to the forums, and Merry Christmas!

That was a great response to the OP , very informative ;)

For that kind of thing, check out your camera manual. I would read through it a couple times if I were you, then just play with your camera

Then read it again and play with your camera , then repeat , repeat ;) a DSLR has a bit of a learning curve.


Olympus OMD EM-5

12-50 , 25 F1.4 , 60 F2.8 Macro , 75 F1.8 , Tripod 3LT Brian , Lee Seven5 .

  
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sfarchie
Member
Avatar
53 posts
Joined Dec 2012
Location: San Francisco
     
Dec 26, 2012 06:31 as a reply to  @ lucasmcd's post |  #7

I have this lens and it can start to getting heavy in no time. Have a tripod or monopod with you as the day wears on.


Canon 7D (for now); Zeiss 35mm f/1.4 Distagon T*, Zeiss 50mm f/1.4 Planar T*, Zeiss 85mm f/1.4 Planar T*, Canon 70-200 f/4L

  
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TSchrief
Goldmember
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2,099 posts
Joined Aug 2012
Location: Bourbon, Indiana
     
Dec 26, 2012 07:33 |  #8
bannedPermanent ban

Colby:
Get out the manual. Get out the camera. Read the manual WHILE doing whatever it says ON THE CAMERA. You will learn a lot that way. Sounds like you need it. Advice is well and good, but there is no substitute for experience. Nobody ever learned to play the piano by listening to someone else talk about playing the piano. Best wishes with your new hobby.


Gear List

  
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Romax12
Member
189 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Dec 2012
     
Dec 26, 2012 08:25 |  #9

if reading the manual is not on your mind' you can always watch hundreads of videos on youtube.
here is a video about the t3i (almost the same as your camera) explaining all of the buttons and everything else you need to know:
part 1:
http://www.youtube.com​/watch?v=rYz7_C16eRg (external link)
part 2:
http://www.youtube.com​/watch?v=F2-FORPiccU (external link)
part 3:
http://www.youtube.com​/watch?v=g7rnCGgfYmA (external link)

I hope i helped you :)


Canon t3i
--- EF-S 18-135 f3.5-5.6 IS --- EF 70-200 f2.8 L IS usm ---
600ex-rt and yn-622c (2x)

  
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JRET
Senior Member
261 posts
Joined Feb 2009
     
Dec 26, 2012 09:05 |  #10

Colby

You've received some very good (and valuable) tips & advice from the other posters. Several things to keep in mind ...

  • the learning curve for DSLR cameras and lenses can be rather steep to learn all the intricacies ... and just when you learn things at one level you discover that another "higher" level exists and you will want to go there next
  • it's tough to be patient when you want "instant" results but eventually you will achieve those results and have a sense of self satisfaction of your achievements
  • while some aspects of a DSLR are easy enough it generally takes a bit of time to master the other, more difficult areas of a DSLR and photography in general
I took my first photo in 1948 using a Kodak Brownie b/w ... it's kind of fun to look back at those first photos and realize how much I've learned AND how much I still have to learn, even after all these years. The hobby of photography is very rewarding ... hang in there, learn as much as you can, take lots of photos, and ENJOY !!!

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RHChan84
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Dec 26, 2012 11:21 |  #11

There is a book called Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson, I would spend some quality time with that book after reading your manual about your camera. That book with greatly help with why your shots did not cone out the way you wanted it to come out.
One other thing is to post your photos with the EXIF and we can tell you what is wrong but you will not learn and your going to have a lot of photos that won't come out correct and you will come back and ask us what is wrong over and over again.


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TSchrief
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Dec 26, 2012 11:54 |  #12
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ColbyL: There a lots of tips here. Check out the books and videos. Play with your camera. Most of all practice! Try things to see what they do. Experiment. You will become more familiar with your camera and what the various settings and adjustments do. One day, you'll look at a bad shot and you will know what you did wrong. That is the beginning of getting a good handle on using a DSLR.

Just like JRET above, my first camera was a Brownie (Hawkeye Flash). That was about 1965 for me. I went to manual SLRs in the 70s, and DSLR in 2009. I am still learning. The more you know, the more you will want to know. The downside (?) of photography is the more you spend, the more you will want to spend.


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ColbyL
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Dec 26, 2012 23:34 |  #13

Thank you all for all of the wonderful information. Very helpful information. I will definitely follow it and hopefully learn how to use both my camera and my lens. I will also be going to go pick up some books on photography, hopefully sometime this week, especially the one(s) by Bryan Peterson.

I do have a few more questions, however. I am looking into getting a tripod. I'm not exactly sure what brand of tripod to get. I am looking for a durable, high quality, 72" tripod but have no idea what brand to get. I don't want anything wobbly or low quality. What is the best tripod to get that doesn't cost a lot of money?

I also heard that with this lens that I will need an A II (W) Mount Ring to mount it on a tripod. Is this a MUST for this lens if it were to be on a tripod? Are there any other options for a high quality mount ring that I can buy that's not going to cost me a lot of money?




  
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BubbaRob
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Dec 26, 2012 23:55 |  #14

drzenitram wrote in post #15407700 (external link)
For that kind of thing, check out your camera manual. I would read through it a couple times if I were you, then just play with your camera!

Hit up Youtube, there a ton of great instructional photography videos that really helped me learn a ton when I was clueless. I found The Digital Photography 1 on 1 show was the winner for being easy to understand.

Rob


60D, 50/1.8, 15-85, 55-250, (70-200 f/4 IS Next on the list! :lol:)

  
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uOpt
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Dec 27, 2012 00:01 |  #15

ColbyL wrote in post #15411221 (external link)
Thank you all for all of the wonderful information. Very helpful information. I will definitely follow it and hopefully learn how to use both my camera and my lens. I will also be going to go pick up some books on photography, hopefully sometime this week, especially the one(s) by Bryan Peterson.

I do have a few more questions, however. I am looking into getting a tripod. I'm not exactly sure what brand of tripod to get. I am looking for a durable, high quality, 72" tripod but have no idea what brand to get. I don't want anything wobbly or low quality. What is the best tripod to get that doesn't cost a lot of money?

I also heard that with this lens that I will need an A II (W) Mount Ring to mount it on a tripod. Is this a MUST for this lens if it were to be on a tripod? Are there any other options for a high quality mount ring that I can buy that's not going to cost me a lot of money?

Just get something cheap as long as it has a proper ballhead.

A tripod can hold that lens without the ring. However it'll take longer for the setup to be still after it starts shaking.


My imagine composition sucks. I need a heavier lens.

  
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