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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 14 Jan 2013 (Monday) 12:46
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Lens changing technique?

 
RPCrowe
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Jan 14, 2013 14:10 |  #16

Tom Reichner wrote in post #15487725 (external link)
Oh, I have the 2nd body . . . but they're very different bodies - a 1.6 crop and a FF. Often times, changing lenses on the fly is necessary to get the ideal lens/body combination for the particular image I am looking to create.

Although I can grasp the reason for using two diferent formats, it seems as this may defeat one of my primary reasons for shooting with two cameras; that is eliminating or at least reducing the need to change lenses...

I am glad that I read this because I was thinking about getting a full frame camera so that there would really be no gap between the 17-55mm on a crop and the 70-200mm on a full frame body...


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Tom ­ Reichner
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Jan 14, 2013 14:26 as a reply to  @ RPCrowe's post |  #17

gjl711 wrote in post #15487743 (external link)
4 bodies then?

Ha! That'd be great - if I could somehow manage to carry them all, and a tripod, to boot. Nah, I'm not that strong or fit - and I can be a bit clumsy. Better stick to just the two bodies.


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leftnose
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Jan 14, 2013 14:31 |  #18

Tom Reichner wrote in post #15487725 (external link)
Oh, I have the 2nd body . . . but they're very different bodies - a 1.6 crop and a FF. Often times, changing lenses on the fly is necessary to get the ideal lens/body combination for the particular image I am looking to create.

Uh?

I own a 5D3 and had a 5D2 before that. Occasionally, I rent a 7D. With a 24-105L on the 5D and a 70-300L on the 7D, I have 24-480mm covered basically without interruption. I only do this when I know I won't have time to swap lenses. If I know I'll have the time, I won't rent the 7D and can shoot primes, zooms, whatever.

If you own a crop and a FF, you shouldn't be swapping lenses in the heat of the moment.




  
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convergent
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Jan 14, 2013 14:41 |  #19

I don't have a particular process as it depends on what lens, and what setting. I sometimes just grab the body with one hand and the lens with the other and push the button and twist it off in one motion. I would then put the lens aside, swap the back lens cap to the lens I just took off, then slap the new lens on.

With some sports, especially basketball, if I'm just using one body I might swap lenses back and forth every minute as the action goes back and forth on the court. When I am shooting field sports with a big tele, I'm constantly swapping in and out a TC, so I'll actually hold the TC in my left hand without any caps, when its not mounted. If I need to add it, I sit the lens hood down, pull the body off with my right hand, put the TC on the lens with my left hand, then twist the body on... reverse to take it off.


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Sp2Pilot
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Jan 14, 2013 15:21 |  #20

jwp721 wrote in post #15487489 (external link)
I have always been more concerned about stuff falling into my camera than into my lens....

So stand new lens upward on level ground (or in camera bag) with rear cap already loosened. Remove old lens from camera while pointing the camera downward (to prevent anything from entering the camera). Place old lens beside new lens. Move rear cap to old lens and mount new lens onto camera. Tighten down the rear cap on the old lens and store in camera bag. During the process the camera is always in my left hand and pointed downward and all moving of lenses is done with my right hand.

Oh and be sure to take a few breaths to create some condensation and wipe front of lens with the corner of my tee shirt for good measure. ;)

I do this, except with opposite hands.


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xhack
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Jan 14, 2013 16:08 |  #21

I do make an effort to make lens changes as quick as possible - the usual pre-loosening of end caps, etc. But I'm not phobic about it.

I've never seen the logic of keeping the lens throat facing down when changing lens to avoid dust ' falling' down into the mirror box. Gravity takes the heavy stuff to earth reasonably quickly - the remaining airborne dust responds more to eddies and will just as easily swirl up into the open lens throat than plummet to earth.

I've acquired four bodies in the last five years and have yet to do a wet clean. A rocket blower on the sensor is enough. I do have one tiny oil spot down on the bottom left hand corner on the 5Dc sensor; it's the work of a moment to clone it out in PP. But I will get round to it . . . eventually.


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2n10
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Jan 14, 2013 16:12 |  #22

gjl711 wrote in post #15487583 (external link)
I don't worry about it any more. Cleaning a sensor is so easy and takes such little time that all these complex rituals used to minimize the time a lens is removed is more complicated and time consuming in the long run. That's not to say I remove the lens and leave it sitting open for hours while I hunt up the replacement, I do get things ready and try to do things quickly, but fretting about the few dust particles that may or may not blow in is just not worth it.

So, I will change lenses sometimes while the camera is laying on something, or hanging around my neck, or my wife is holding it or in whatever position is easiest at the time I need to make the lens switch. I don't pay a whole lot of attention to order in which things are done, I figure the individual swap will dictate which step is most natural at the time.

The only time I get really careful is when I am shooting at the beach or in some other very dusty location. Then I get a lot more careful.

My method also.


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SkipD
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Jan 14, 2013 17:02 |  #23

Mark II wrote in post #15487374 (external link)
1.Lay camera, with lens mounted, on its back & completely loosen but not remove attached lens.

There's a HUGE risk with this step.

You should NEVER take both of your hands off the body. Doing so is risking damage by accidentally sweeping it off the support surface.

In addition, pointing the open camera body upward is just asking for something to drop into it.


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Mark ­ II
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Jan 14, 2013 17:28 |  #24

SkipD wrote in post #15488615 (external link)
There's a HUGE risk with this step.

You should NEVER take both of your hands off the body. Doing so is risking damage by accidentally sweeping it off the support surface.

In addition, pointing the open camera body upward is just asking for something to drop into it.

How in Gods name will it get swept off of the support surface? :confused:Who is going to sweep it off? All one is doing is picking up a lens and putting one right back the same way. Wax on-Wax off!

When changing the lens, the camera is open for literally less than 1 sec.
How can you get any faster than that? :confused:
A camera sensor is much easier to clean than the inside of a lens. I'd rather chance being able to fix the problem by cleaning the camera's sensor rather than having to send the lens to Canon for cleaning.

If you have a better method I'm all ears .... er, eyes.


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I ­ weston ­ I
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Jan 14, 2013 17:33 |  #25

You guys are paranoid about changing lenses huh? I just swap them out without thinking about much. I would say the camera body is what I worry about dust/ debris getting into though.


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SkipD
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Jan 14, 2013 17:37 |  #26

Mark II wrote in post #15488737 (external link)
If you have a better method I'm all ears .... er, eyes.

First off, I carry my camera and all of the lenses in a shoulder bag. All of the lenses are stored in vertically oriented "tubes" in the bag.

When I want to change a lens, I hold the body in my left hand (I'm right-handed) with the lens generally pointing downward and the camera strap around my neck. I then remove the lens from the camera with my right hand. The lens then goes into its "tube" in the bag with the mount end upward. I then move a rear cap from the "new" lens to the one that I just put into the bag. Then I pull the "new" lens out of the bag with my right hand and insert it into the body that I am still holding with my left hand.

This method is what I've done for over forty years. It's fast and it's secure. I've never once come close to dropping a camera or lens in the process of changing lenses.

You wouldn't believe how many stories I've heard over the years about folks damaging cameras and/or lenses just because of a silly mistake while changing lenses.


Skip Douglas
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SkipD
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Jan 14, 2013 17:40 |  #27

Mark II wrote in post #15488737 (external link)
How in Gods name will it get swept off of the support surface? :confused:Who is going to sweep it off? All one is doing is picking up a lens and putting one right back the same way. Wax on-Wax off.

I recall one story of a person's cat actually pushing or dragging (I can't remember which) a camera off a table while the owner was right there.


Skip Douglas
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GuitarDTO
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Jan 14, 2013 17:47 |  #28

I keep my camera upright, not on its back or anything. I Rocket Blow the lens/camera around the attachment point before I detach to remove any dust, then I just quickly swap, putting the new lens on before I put the lens cap on the lens I am removing.


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Mark ­ II
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Jan 14, 2013 17:49 |  #29

SkipD wrote in post #15488776 (external link)
I recall one story of a person's cat actually pushing or dragging (I can't remember which) a camera off a table while the owner was right there.

Wow .... with a story like that, you HAVE been around a long time!

SkipD wrote in post #15488767 (external link)
When I want to change a lens, I hold the body in my left hand (I'm right-handed) with the lens generally pointing downward and the camera strap around my neck. I then remove the lens from the camera with my right hand. The lens then goes into its "tube" in the bag with the mount end upward. I then move a rear cap from the "new" lens to the one that I just put into the bag. Then I pull the "new" lens out of the bag with my right hand and insert it into the body that I am still holding with my left hand.

Your sensor is open to the atmosphere 3-5 times longer than my method.
To each their own. I just thought different methods displayed here might help some who have dropped their gear or are subjecting it to the elements for too long.

Thanks for the suggestions everyone!


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Mark ­ II
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Jan 14, 2013 17:51 |  #30

I weston I wrote in post #15488753 (external link)
You guys are paranoid about changing lenses huh? I just swap them out without thinking about much. I would say the camera body is what I worry about dust/ debris getting into though.

Not paranoid at all ..... Just don't like spending $$$ to move dirt.


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Canon 85 L II, EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II, EF 24-105L, 16-35mm f/2.8 II L, 100L & 60mm Macro , Fisheye EF 15mm f2.8, Tokina 10-17

  
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