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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 10 Jan 2013 (Thursday) 13:09
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Canon 50 1.4

 
michgirl
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Jan 11, 2013 18:58 |  #16

I have had mine for nearly a year, bought it used on this forum. I keep the lens hood reversed at all times on this lens. It is on my camera 90% of the time. It never disappoints.


Robin
Canon 6d / EF Lens: 24mm-105mm / 40mm f/2.8 / 28mm f/1.8 / 50mm f/1.8 / 85mm 1.8
Canon T6i / EFs Lens: 24mm Pancake / 18-55mm STM / 18-135mm STM / 55-250mm STM

  
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robert61
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Jan 11, 2013 19:15 |  #17

It's a fine lens and quite worthy at its price point. I sold mine when I got a 1.2L, but sometimes miss the dreamy look of its halation and lens flair when shooting outdoors in bright light. Enjoy it while you can, as its successor will surely be a lot more $$$ in Canon's current pricing strategy.


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Japers
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Jan 15, 2013 15:28 |  #18

Thanks again for the advice everyone, I will definitely have to add a hood soon. I've had the lens for a few days now and I'm loving it so far. Focus is quick and sharp. A wonderful little lens and it balances rather nicely on my 60D. :)


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artyH
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Jan 15, 2013 17:17 as a reply to  @ Japers's post |  #19

It is a good lens for low light. If it doesn't work properly on your camera, Amazon will be good for exchanges.

I always keep the hood on the lens in the normal position. This protects the lens during storage and use. Mine doesn't get heavy use, but has been fine for some time. THe only "problem" with mine is that it overexposes by 1/3 stop. I always remember to set exposure compensation by - 1/3 and all has been fine.




  
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michgirl
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Jan 15, 2013 17:51 |  #20

Japers wrote in post #15492729 (external link)
Thanks again for the advice everyone, I will definitely have to add a hood soon. I've had the lens for a few days now and I'm loving it so far. Focus is quick and sharp. A wonderful little lens and it balances rather nicely on my 60D. :)

Glad to hear that you like it!

Happy Shooting. :D


Robin
Canon 6d / EF Lens: 24mm-105mm / 40mm f/2.8 / 28mm f/1.8 / 50mm f/1.8 / 85mm 1.8
Canon T6i / EFs Lens: 24mm Pancake / 18-55mm STM / 18-135mm STM / 55-250mm STM

  
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davidc502
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Jan 15, 2013 19:54 |  #21

TeamSpeed wrote in post #15473439 (external link)
Refurbing the lens won't fix its flaws... The design internally is the issue.

This is correct as it can develop sticky focus, and has a bad case of axial CA.


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Lyndön
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Jan 15, 2013 20:08 |  #22

I bought a refurb copy from Adorama a few years ago and it's been fine. I do use it with a hood, and never store it with the front of the lens extended. Never had an issue on any of my cameras with it.


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Coffee400
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Jan 15, 2013 23:46 |  #23

I think you will be very happy with this lens. Its a step up in build quality compared to the 1.8, and focus is more reliable. Its a bit soft wide open, but i dont really use it wide open. Ive had mine a few years and never had any problem with the AF etc (although i do take pretty good care of my gear).




  
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HelenOster
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Jan 17, 2013 09:54 |  #24

Josh_30 wrote in post #15493849 (external link)
I bought a refurb copy from Adorama a few years ago and it's been fine.

Delighted to hear it!

Personally, I would never buy new gear if a refurb was available......



  
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Japers
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Jan 17, 2013 10:25 |  #25

Could you expound on that a little Helen? It is because of more rigorous testing during the refurbishing process?


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HelenOster
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Jan 17, 2013 10:31 |  #26

Japers wrote in post #15500287 (external link)
Could you expound on that a little Helen? It is because of more rigorous testing during the refurbishing process?

Sure; refurbs will have been checked over by the manufacturer by hand, inspected very thoroughly, diagnosed, and calibrated by experienced technicians, and could therefore turn out to be more dependable than a new item - which will only have been checked by a process of 'systematic quality control protocol' (ie by random sampling as it comes off the conveyor belt).

Refurbs can have simply been pulled from the production line if something appears faulty, or if they haven’t passed the final inspection. Most of the time it is a very minor issue that needs correcting, nevertheless, once it is pulled from the normal flow of production, it gets flagged as a refurbished model, so you may get a unit straight from the factory that has never been used. (I have three myself, and for sure they were all factory-fresh!)

Of course, a refurb may also be an ex-store demo, possibly used in field tests or sales displays, or it may have been ordered in error and returned to the retailer (who can't then sell it as 'new' so it has to be sent back to the manufacturer for refurbishment). But as long as you buy from a reputable retailer with a decent returns period, then if it, say, has too many actuations for your liking you can return it and try another one.

If what you save on buying a refurb means you can also get yourself a warranty that is as long (or longer) than the manufacturer warranty on a new item, then IMO you can't go wrong.



  
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Japers
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Jan 17, 2013 11:40 as a reply to  @ HelenOster's post |  #27

I see. The idea of buying refurbished is new to me, so I thank you for such detailed information.


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JasonMK
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Jan 17, 2013 11:53 |  #28

This is my favorite lens, and due to the concerns and issues other have had I picked up a hood and leave it on at all times. It protects the front when stored.


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1Ds Mark III | 650D | EF 17~40mm 4L | EF-S 18~135 STM | EF 50mm 1.4 | EF 100mm 2.8 USM Macro | Tamron 70~300mm 4.0-5.6 Di VC USD XLD | 430 EX III | 430 EX II | Lowepro SlingShot 100 AW | EF 25 II | PS CC | LR CC

  
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Zatx
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Jan 17, 2013 14:07 |  #29

HelenOster wrote in post #15500309 (external link)
Sure; refurbs will have been checked over by the manufacturer by hand, inspected very thoroughly, diagnosed, and calibrated by experienced technicians, and could therefore turn out to be more dependable than a new item - which will only have been checked by a process of 'systematic quality control protocol' (ie by random sampling as it comes off the conveyor belt).

Refurbs can have simply been pulled from the production line if something appears faulty, or if they haven’t passed the final inspection. Most of the time it is a very minor issue that needs correcting, nevertheless, once it is pulled from the normal flow of production, it gets flagged as a refurbished model, so you may get a unit straight from the factory that has never been used. (I have three myself, and for sure they were all factory-fresh!)

Of course, a refurb may also be an ex-store demo, possibly used in field tests or sales displays, or it may have been ordered in error and returned to the retailer (who can't then sell it as 'new' so it has to be sent back to the manufacturer for refurbishment). But as long as you buy from a reputable retailer with a decent returns period, then if it, say, has too many actuations for your liking you can return it and try another one.

If what you save on buying a refurb means you can also get yourself a warranty that is as long (or longer) than the manufacturer warranty on a new item, then IMO you can't go wrong.



I think your view of what happens to refurbished products might be a little optimistic. Having worked as a criminal investigator for several large retail chains (and their logistic/distribution systems) I have worked cases in "refurbishment" and "return" centers. The process of refurbishment varies by company and product type but overwhelmingly the refurbishment "process" was a low wage, unskilled worker opening the package, repackaging the product, then the package was sent to whatever distribution process that company used to resell their product. No one else looked at the final product. No one worked on the product. No one gave it a detailed inspection. No one made any attempt to fix any potential problem the product might have had.

Now as to Amazon distribution network, their "refurbishment" doesn't even consist of these minor steps. When they receive a return they just put it right back on their warehouse shelf as new product for the next person that buys that item. I once returned a defective watch, three times. The third time I received the replacement watch it was the very first watch I had sent in the first time. The second watch I received is one that an acquaintance I had from a watch forum had returned.

So, all of that being said, I wouldn't go putting my blind faith in refurbished products.


Current Gear: Canon T4i (gripped), Canon 10-22mm, Sigma 30mm 1.4, Canon EF 85 1.8, 18-55mm Kit, 55-250mm, Yogo YN-468 Flash, LR 4, Carryspeed Slim, lots of bags.
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HelenOster
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Jan 17, 2013 15:08 |  #30

Zatx wrote in post #15501149 (external link)
I think your view of what happens to refurbished products might be a little optimistic. Having worked as a criminal investigator for several large retail chains (and their logistic/distribution systems) I have worked cases in "refurbishment" and "return" centers. The process of refurbishment varies by company and product type but overwhelmingly the refurbishment "process" was a low wage, unskilled worker opening the package, repackaging the product, then the package was sent to whatever distribution process that company used to resell their product. No one else looked at the final product. No one worked on the product. No one gave it a detailed inspection. No one made any attempt to fix any potential problem the product might have had.

Now as to Amazon distribution network, their "refurbishment" doesn't even consist of these minor steps. When they receive a return they just put it right back on their warehouse shelf as new product for the next person that buys that item. I once returned a defective watch, three times. The third time I received the replacement watch it was the very first watch I had sent in the first time. The second watch I received is one that an acquaintance I had from a watch forum had returned.

So, all of that being said, I wouldn't go putting my blind faith in refurbished products.

Canon cameras are refurbished at their manufacturing plant in Newport News, VA.; the room that houses Canon’s entire refurb process is said to be completely dust-free, and with every employee working in there being required to wear special booties!



  
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