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Thread started 19 Jan 2013 (Saturday) 23:01
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photo editing difference?

 
satchmolouie
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Jan 19, 2013 23:01 |  #1
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Are their benefits in buying a more expensive computer like a macbookpro, than a cheap pc, for around 300? Am i limited to photo editing software if i buy cheaper?


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Jan 19, 2013 23:08 |  #2

Photo editing software have a minimum requirement (i.e. ram) to run on a computer. If the cheaper computer you have doesnt meet the requirement then you will be limited.


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sportmode
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Jan 19, 2013 23:26 as a reply to  @ treck_dialect's post |  #3

The cheap $300 laptop will have a cheap LCD display panel and the colors will probably be washed out.


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satchmolouie
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Jan 19, 2013 23:27 |  #4
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^^^^^ Another good reason, but would an older macbookpro have that issue too possibly?

treck_dialect wrote in post #15510337 (external link)
Photo editing software have a minimum requirement (i.e. ram) to run on a computer. If the cheaper computer you have doesnt meet the requirement then you will be limited.

Ive been aiming at a used macbookpro, on the main idea that i wont have any trouble getting the program i need.


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Jan 20, 2013 00:45 |  #5

satchmolouie wrote in post #15510320 (external link)
Are their benefits in buying a more expensive computer like a macbookpro, than a cheap pc, for around 300? Am i limited to photo editing software if i buy cheaper?



The price of basic components is now quite low, and if your shooting with a current gen camera, and not processing lots of photos at once, even a basic spec intel i3 based computer is sufficient.
You can even pick up a high spec i7 based computer that will rival the most expensive Mac for less than a $1000.

However, you do still get what you pay for, and the differnce is not in the performance, but in the quality of the parts used and the potential after sales support.

There are plenty of self build and brand name computers that are similar in price and spec to a Mac, or that even exceed them.
The cheapest and most expensive computers are Windows based.


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satchmolouie
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Jan 20, 2013 00:53 |  #6
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Moppie wrote in post #15510539 (external link)
.

However, you do still get what you pay for, and the differnce is not in the performance, but in the quality of the parts used and the potential after sales support.

There are plenty of self build and brand name computers that are similar in price and spec to a Mac, or that even exceed them.
The cheapest and most expensive computers are Windows based.

Thaaaaank you!!!!:)


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Rashkh
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Jan 20, 2013 06:13 |  #7

I'll be blunt and say that you don't want an older laptop in general, and a mac specifically, for editing photos for several reasons.

A. It's only recently that laptops have started to come with decent screens. Most are either glossy, low res, have terrible color reproduction or a combination of the three. Having owned a 24" iMac and used older macbook pros for editing, their screens are designed to make movies look really good. Photos I edited on my macs looked way worse when viewed on my ips screen.

B. Laptops tend to be a lot more expensive for the hardware you're getting due to the technical challenges of the platform (building around limited space, limited venting and limited battery life). Macs tend to be more expensive than pc's pound for pound. If you prefer OSX to Windows, then that balances out the cost difference.

C. Laptops are very difficult or impossible to upgrade. As cameras get better and new standards come out (usb 3.0, qfd, etc.), you will not be able to reap those benefits. This also goes for processor and video card. Let's just say that my old iMac hated me when I went from a 350D to a 5DII (imacs are also not upgradeable). Macs are generally worse in this category as well (sealed batteries, required overpriced hard drives, etc.). This doesn't apply to all macs, but Apple tends to have a very strict anti modding policy.

With a desktop computer, you can spend a lot less and will be able to upgrade later. If you want a computer that's complete overkill (12GB of RAM and an i5, for example), it'll cost you about $1000. That's including an IPS screen. You'll also be able to upgrade it in the future. You can only really do the same thing, Mac wise, with a mac pro, which is quite expensive.




  
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satchmolouie
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Jan 20, 2013 14:04 |  #8
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Rashkh wrote in post #15510972 (external link)
With a desktop computer, you can spend a lot less and will be able to upgrade later. If you want a computer that's complete overkill (12GB of RAM and an i5, for example), it'll cost you about $1000. That's including an IPS screen. You'll also be able to upgrade it in the future. You can only really do the same thing, Mac wise, with a mac pro, which is quite expensive.



Hmm, that brought up a lot of good facts. :) So maybe spending that large amount for the over kill, at the end doesnt make a hell of a difference on how my images would print out?


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tickerguy
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Jan 21, 2013 09:35 |  #9

The one place it's worth the money is on an IPS panel. But there are few laptops that have them. I have a Lenovo X220 that does, and I'm very happy that I popped for the extra $50 when I bought it a couple of years ago.


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Jan 22, 2013 15:56 |  #10

satchmolouie wrote in post #15512391 (external link)
Hmm, that brought up a lot of good facts. :) So maybe spending that large amount for the over kill, at the end doesnt make a hell of a difference on how my images would print out?

I don't think that's what he was saying. I believe the point was that a laptop generally doesn't give you the most bang for your buck when it comes to something for photo editing. That said, if you need the transportability of a laptop. . .or just would rather have a laptop, an option is to get a mid-level laptop with a DVI out (I imagine most if not all laptops these days have DVI out) and buy a separate monitor. As far as which laptop, you'll have to tell us more about your photo editing needs. What programs are you planning to use? Do you plan on editing any video? Also, how involved is your photo editing? For example, a few touch-ups in Lightroom doesn't require the same resources as doing an HDR Panorama with Black & White conversion and multiple clone and adjustment layers in Photo Shop.




  
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Jan 23, 2013 09:33 |  #11

IslandCrow wrote in post #15521208 (external link)
That said, if you need the transportability of a laptop. . .or just would rather have a laptop, an option is to get a mid-level laptop with a DVI out (I imagine most if not all laptops these days have DVI out) and buy a separate monitor.

My Dell Latitude E6420 is hardly new, and it has HDMI output rather than DVI. Just be sure that all the equipment has the right ports to work together.

Also, you need to match up the capabilities of the computer with those of the monitor to assure maximum performance. For example, on my desktop I only get the full resolution on my monitors if I use the Display Port input. With HDMI the resolution is lower, and with DVI lower still.


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Jan 23, 2013 14:27 |  #12

I'm quite happy with a 13" Macbook Air, because the performance is great for Lightroom and I can fit it in my camera bag so that I can offload images from my SD cards directly to the Air on location, and start my sorting and rough processing before I'm back to my desk.


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satchmolouie
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Jan 24, 2013 00:42 |  #13
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hhhmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.


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Jan 29, 2013 08:50 |  #14

I've used Mac laptops to edit photos since the 1990's and their screens have always been superior to PC's. If you found an older one I would have no hesitation in considering it for editing because of the screen. What you need to focus on are three things: does it have enough ram memory; is the processor fast enough to handle heavy processing and is the graphics card adequate.

Mac laptops generally come with better processors and graphic cards as standard fare than their PC counterparts. You can get better screens, processors and graphic cards in PC laptops, but you have to add them on as options and pay more. But, I wouldn't go too far back in time on the Mac either as technology has moved rapidly.

BTW, I use a 2010 MacBook Air with a 2.13 MHZ Core Duo processor that processes my files in either Lightroom or Photoshop with a breeze.


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Jan 29, 2013 11:37 |  #15

Jon_Doh wrote in post #15547579 (external link)
BTW, I use a 2010 MacBook Air with a 2.13 MHZ Core Duo processor that processes my files in either Lightroom or Photoshop with a breeze.

Because your camera is about as out dated as your advice :cool:


Lenovo was putting high end IPS screens in laptops long before Apple was.
A lot of windows based laptops use lower end screens than the Macbooks, a lot use exactly the same screens, and some used higher end screens.
Currently only Apple is using very high resolution screens in laptops (Retina displays), but it is still a new idea and there is limited supply and doubt as to how useful they really are.

Apple computers in general, including Mac Books have used the same processors as Windows based computers since they switched to Intel. There is no longer any hardware performance difference, except that Apple is often behind the development curve, usually switching to the latest and fastest Intel processors after they have been in the market for 6-12 months.

Upgrades are pay more options, and in more and more cases things like RAM are being soldered to the board, meaning you have to pay extra to get the upgrades from Apple at the time of purchase.
It's becoming more and more common in the industry in general as it saves on space and reduces the number of parts in the manufacturing process. It also lets you rort your customers.


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