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Thread started 12 Jan 2013 (Saturday) 01:23
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how useful do you find battery grips

 
Mackeral
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Jan 20, 2013 09:12 |  #31
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blogs wrote in post #15510532 (external link)
The funniest thing about grips is people saying they need them for their 'big hands', but then you read about the advent of mirror less cameras and how they are so much better because they dont have the bulk and weight of current dslrs lol crazy...

I know, it's amazing. People and their different opinions. Your weird vendetta against grips is cute.


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mrfixitx
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Jan 20, 2013 09:25 |  #32

For me the big advantage is the buttons for when I shoot in portrait orientation which is quite often. Without the battery grip it always felt awkward and would make my wrist sore.

Battery life is a nice bonus but batteries on the 40D seem to last forever so it's not much of a benefit in that regard.


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jbrackjr
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Jan 20, 2013 10:19 |  #33

Last time I had a grip it was for my OM-1, only got it for the motor drive. Worked great.

For the last year, I have been using a 60D (no grip) & 100-400 about 90% of the time. For me, it works and works well and I have large hands. Now if I was to go to a bigger and heavier lens, maybe a grip might make the camera and lens more controllable and or comfortable. But with the light weight setup I have, I just don't need it.


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Wilt
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Jan 20, 2013 11:34 |  #34

It seems that about half of dSLR users think the only correct way is to rotate their camera clockwise to portrait mode...putting shutter button at bottom of camera. Totally unsuitable for using the supplemental control bottoms that are located on battery grips.


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ManiZ
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Jan 20, 2013 12:56 |  #35

This topic comes up a lot.

I have very large hands so a grip is the only way I can be comfortable; the entry-level SLRs (Rebel series) are too small for me even with a grip. The ease of use for vertical framing is an added bonus. I didn't buy it for the extra battery or for the option of using AAs.

blogs wrote in post #15510532 (external link)
The funniest thing about grips is people saying they need them for their 'big hands', but then you read about the advent of mirror less cameras and how they are so much better because they dont have the bulk and weight of current dslrs lol crazy...

It is funny for sure; made me laugh when I read it. I am sure you are attempting to make a point. So the "new" cameras are smaller than DSLRs? They sure are. That's why I won't own one. What's the point again? I am more than a little lost.


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SYS
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Jan 20, 2013 13:04 |  #36

I sold my grip long ago, and I've been lighter ever since...



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krb
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Jan 20, 2013 17:23 |  #37

blogs wrote in post #15510532 (external link)
The funniest thing about grips is people saying they need them for their 'big hands', but then you read about the advent of mirror less cameras and how they are so much better because they dont have the bulk and weight of current dslrs lol crazy...

The funniest thing about these threads is people who make "apples and oranges" comparisons like this, demonstrating that they don't have any idea what they are talking about. Do you also laugh at people who want large pickup trucks when towing things on the weekend but want something smaller for sitting in traffic and parking on city streets during the week?


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DTZee
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Jan 20, 2013 17:27 |  #38

Good question. I find it nice to pack double the juice when I am on a trip so I don't have to change batteries as often. The real reason I like it is the added size and security when used with a handstrap. I feel better holding onto it vs body only.


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Ilovetheleafs
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Jan 20, 2013 18:06 |  #39

NCSA197 wrote in post #15510884 (external link)
So I guess the folks that don't like a grip think you shouldn't like them, either. Some folks find them useful.

Try one on your camera (Can you borrow one?). If it improves how YOU use your camera, buy it; if not, don't.

If you buy one, just don't tell; sombody will yell at you!

I found one on sale, bought it and then started this thread. I'm just waiting for it to ship to me :D at the price I found it for I figured I could always flip it for more than I paid if I don't like it.


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KirkS518
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Jan 20, 2013 18:47 as a reply to  @ Ilovetheleafs's post |  #40

I started with a Bell & Howell FD35 (Canon TX) with no grip. Moved up to the Canon AE-1, which had this small piece of plastic that resembles a grip. Then I moved to the Canon EOS 620, which has a nice thick grip. 25 years later, I bought a Rebet XT. My hands are not big, but the XT didn't feel great in my hands, so I got a grip. The added batteries and weight (IMO) made it feel much more comfortable. On Friday, I got a 50D. A considerably larger body. Where you hold it feels good, but honestly, my pinky can't find a home on it. I spent the last 2 days contemplating a grip for it. It also seems that the battery life on the 50D isn't very good with a single battery, and, I really dislike neck straps. So, a new BG is on it's way from Adorama.

I think that you'll find the camera will feel a little more comfortable when you have he grip. It's all about that pinky. The grip doesn't thicken the area where you grab the body, it just gives your pinky a home, but it makes a difference.

I never had a battery drain problem with the gripped XT, except one time when I shot nearly 2,000 shots during a group modeling event, but it sure was nice not worrying about it. True, a battery change takes all of 30 seconds, but it could be a critical 30 seconds that you don't want to miss.

I'll lay 2:1 odds you end up liking and keeping the grip on a Rebel. :)


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NCSA197
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Jan 20, 2013 19:02 |  #41

Ilovetheleafs wrote in post #15513220 (external link)
I found one on sale, bought it and then started this thread. I'm just waiting for it to ship to me :D at the price I found it for I figured I could always flip it for more than I paid if I don't like it.

Don't tell blogs you bought a grip!! He'll tell you they start tooth decay and heart disease. NO ONE NEEDS A GRIP! lol.

After you started this thread, I took the grip off my T3i, and used it for a day. It's back on to stay. THIS camera, to ME, just feels better with the grip. One time (only) my batteries needed a charge (brain fade), I was away from any way to charge them, and the AA battery holder got me through the day. Probably won't happen again, so the "more battery life" issue is at best occasional.

"Your Results May Vary"


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Stone ­ 13
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Jan 20, 2013 19:47 |  #42

blogs wrote in post #15510532 (external link)
The funniest thing about grips is people saying they need them for their 'big hands', but then you read about the advent of mirror less cameras and how they are so much better because they dont have the bulk and weight of current dslrs lol crazy...

For the life of me, I just can't figure out how one relates to the other. Exactly what is your point?

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Jon
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Jan 20, 2013 21:19 |  #43

Stone 13 wrote in post #15513597 (external link)
For the life of me, I just can't figure out how one relates to the other. Exactly what is your point?

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FWIW, I have "big hands" (glove size XL), and, while I got a grip for my 20D, I sold it on. Never bought grips for my D60, 5D, 5D2 or 7D, and I'd be delighted if there was a 1D variant that was as svelte as the 5D line. And I find the EOS M a remarkably versatile and easy-to-use camera. I'm more likely to run out of card space than battery life and by supporting the camera from beneath with my left hand, it doesn't matter that my right little finger can't curl around the camera. This holds true with lenses from the Sigma 15-30 through the Canon 24-70, 70-200 IS and 100-400 as well as the few short lenses, like the 35 mm f/2 or the 100 L macro, I do use.

So what's your point? For best camera stability, you should be supporting your camera from beneath with your left hand, not clutching it tensely with your right hand (which you're also expecting to smoothly press the shutter release). Try it some time.


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Stone ­ 13
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Jan 20, 2013 22:21 |  #44

Jon wrote in post #15513880 (external link)
FWIW, I have "big hands" (glove size XL), and, while I got a grip for my 20D, I sold it on. Never bought grips for my D60, 5D, 5D2 or 7D, and I'd be delighted if there was a 1D variant that was as svelte as the 5D line. And I find the EOS M a remarkably versatile and easy-to-use camera. I'm more likely to run out of card space than battery life and by supporting the camera from beneath with my left hand, it doesn't matter that my right little finger can't curl around the camera. This holds true with lenses from the Sigma 15-30 through the Canon 24-70, 70-200 IS and 100-400 as well as the few short lenses, like the 35 mm f/2 or the 100 L macro, I do use.

So what's your point? For best camera stability, you should be supporting your camera from beneath with your left hand, not clutching it tensely with your right hand (which you're also expecting to smoothly press the shutter release). Try it some time.

Jon,

To each his own, that still doesn't explain how the guy I quoted can relate

a) a person who prefers the extra heft as well as the other benefits of adding a grip to their DSLR

to

b) some unknown, unquoted source touting the "superiority" of mirrorless cameras because they have less weight


I have big hands, I prefer a big DSLR, perhaps he has small hands more suitable for a powershot, I just don't know but I don't want to assume that he likes smaller cameras for some superficial reason. Unlike what he's done to the rest of us who don't share his point of view. Having said that, he's not really giving us much to go on. If you understood what he was trying to say, then please elaborate because I simply don't get it and looking back at this thread, I'm not the only one.....


Ken
Fujifilm X100T | 5D III gripped |35L | 24-70 2.8L II | 70-200 2.8L IS II | 85 1.8 | 430 EX II | Yongnuo YN-568EX | Billingham 445 | Think Tank UD 60 |

  
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blogs
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Jan 20, 2013 22:28 |  #45

NCSA197 wrote in post #15510884 (external link)
So I guess the folks that don't like a grip think you shouldn't like them, either. Some folks find them useful.

Try one on your camera (Can you borrow one?). If it improves how YOU use your camera, buy it; if not, don't.

If you buy one, just don't tell; sombody will yell at you!

I'm sure they are very useful for portrait shots, I just think their 'must have status' is way over baked. I am involved in many different pastimes and they all have 'must have' items...until something comes along and shows that they were never really needed.

Hence my point with mirror less-what are people going to do when these become mainstream, bolt big heavy blocks of ballast on their camera to assist with balance and their huge man hands, all the while boasting how much more convenient the small and light body is? Lol

Let's just put them along with card readers and just about every body building 'supplement' as pet hates of mine ;)




  
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