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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 12 Feb 2013 (Tuesday) 16:29
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Back button focusing - When and why?

 
Luckless
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Feb 12, 2013 20:06 |  #16

JeffreyG wrote in post #15603675 (external link)
Why?

Nobody is going to pick up my camera and use it without my asking them to. And when I want someone to take a picture using my camera then having back button focus enabled would be just one more step in the tedius process of getting them to the point where they can use it.

Because it adds to the joke of the overly large and complex camera when someone nags me to let them try, and then they can't even focus. Also has meant that in the rare cases where someone who I can't directly say no to (aka, some family members) asks if they can use my camera, then having it set to back button focus and 'forgetting' to explain how it works keeps them from asking again.

It isn't really a big reason why I like it, but still good for a small joke.


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abacus022
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Feb 12, 2013 20:32 as a reply to  @ Luckless's post |  #17

I just learn about this, and have only recently started using it. My biggest problem is remembering from one day to the next.

I'll pick up the camera, and go what the hell? Then remember a few seconds later and feel stupid.

It's getting better :)


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Luckless
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Feb 12, 2013 21:44 |  #18

abacus022 wrote in post #15603894 (external link)
I just learn about this, and have only recently started using it. My biggest problem is remembering from one day to the next.

I'll pick up the camera, and go what the hell? Then remember a few seconds later and feel stupid.

It's getting better :)

Yeah, does take a bit of time to make the adjustment, and I know that stupid feeling all too well. Nearly as bad as forgetting you put the lens cap back on, and raising the camera to your eye.


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chrismarriott66
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Feb 13, 2013 02:06 |  #19

I used to try and use it a bit when my 50d was my main camera, however, now I've got the 5d3 I find it's just as easy to move the focus point to pretty much wherever I want! Obviously this doesn't get around the switch between a static and moving subject, but I don't tend to find myself in those situations that much.

The main reason I stopped using it, however, was because I found myself still selecting one-shot to get the benefit of the AF-assist lamp on a speedlite (which doesn't work in AI-Servo). So I was essentially using back button focusing in one-shot mode which didn't really seem that beneficial.


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LeeRatters
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Feb 13, 2013 02:55 as a reply to  @ chrismarriott66's post |  #20

JeffreyG wrote in post #15603675 (external link)
Why?

Nobody is going to pick up my camera and use it without my asking them to. And when I want someone to take a picture using my camera then having back button focus enabled would be just one more step in the tedius process of getting them to the point where they can use it.

Seriously. My 8 year old daughter can use my 5D2 with back button focusing....


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mikeinctown
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Feb 13, 2013 10:57 |  #21

LeeRatters wrote in post #15604728 (external link)
Seriously. My 8 year old daughter can use my 5D2 with back button focusing....

LMAO, my thoughts too. You aim and press a button. How hard could it be?

When I first learned of back button focus on my T3i i set my camera and instantly started taking better pictures. That is once I remembered to press the button instead of the shutter button. Now that I have my 5D2 I set it there from day one. The only thing I wish I could figure out is the exposure lock. (is there even an exposure lock in manual mode?)




  
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Tom ­ Reichner
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Feb 13, 2013 11:00 |  #22

mikeinctown wrote in post #15605716 (external link)
The only thing I wish I could figure out is the exposure lock. (is there even an exposure lock in manual mode?)

Manual Mode is an exposure lock! The entire mode is used to "lock" exposure to one setting, so that it will not vary from one moment to the next.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
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jt354
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Feb 13, 2013 11:00 |  #23

I have my camera set to rear AF only. That way I can focus and recompose or manual focus using the shutter release.


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Numenorean
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Feb 13, 2013 11:06 |  #24

Only really useful if you use AI Servo. If you use One Shot, there's no real advantage.


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Luckless
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Feb 13, 2013 11:41 |  #25

Numenorean wrote in post #15605748 (external link)
Only really useful if you use AI Servo. If you use One Shot, there's no real advantage.

Ah, how about focusing on something, stepping away from your rig for whatever reason (Such as adjusting something in the scene while your camera is on its tripod) and returning to hit the shutter release? Not everyone has a suitable remote.


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Numenorean
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Feb 13, 2013 11:43 |  #26

Luckless wrote in post #15605872 (external link)
Ah, how about focusing on something, stepping away from your rig for whatever reason (Such as adjusting something in the scene while your camera is on its tripod) and returning to hit the shutter release? Not everyone has a suitable remote.

If I'm using a tripod for a set scene on a tripod, I'd just use manual focus. The only time I use a tripod is for landscape shots and then it's on MF. So still no use for BBF.


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mikeinctown
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Feb 13, 2013 11:47 |  #27

Tom Reichner wrote in post #15605727 (external link)
Manual Mode is an exposure lock! The entire mode is used to "lock" exposure to one setting, so that it will not vary from one moment to the next.

Ok, I was confused to the terms. I know the metering continues to change as I am composing a photo. Need to make sure I meter before I recompose so i don't change the exposure of what I really wanted.

Someone else mentioned that in the custom modes, you can set the back button and other settings. So if I want C1 to back button focus, along with continuous shutter, I can set those, and then switching to Manual or C2 will have me back at one click? Are there any settings that carry over between the custom settings?

I'd love to set one custom setting in a landscape type mode, one in a sports type mode, and the third in a portrait type mode. I've been happy playing in Manual, but the other ones would make switching a breeze.




  
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Tom ­ Reichner
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Feb 13, 2013 11:53 |  #28

Numenorean wrote in post #15605748 (external link)
Only really useful if you use AI Servo. If you use One Shot, there's no real advantage.

For me there would be an advantage. I use AF for 99.9% of my images (almost never use manual focus). I also focus & recompose for the majority of my images.

In One Shot mode, without back button focus, if I want to focus and recompose, I have to press the shutter button half way down to achieve focus. Then, while moving the camera to recompose the shot, I have to somehow keep my finger half way down on the shutter button.

If, during the time it takes me to carefully move the camera to frame the shot most perfectly, I accidentally press a little too hard with my finger, I end up accidentally taking a shot before I intended to.

If I don't press quite hard enough, the shutter button comes up out of the halfway position, and I lose focus and have to start over again. (well, technically, I don't lose focus, but I would lose my intended focus as soon as I again touched the shutter button to take the shot)

This happened to me all the time before I "discovered" back button focus. I simply do not have the precise muscle control that is necessary to maintain the proper pressure on a button for a few seconds.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
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gonzogolf
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Feb 13, 2013 11:55 |  #29

Tom Reichner wrote in post #15605914 (external link)
For me there would be an advantage. I use AF for 99.9% of my images (almost never use manual focus). I also focus & recompose for the majority of my images.

In One Shot mode, without back button focus, if I want to focus and recompose, I have to press the shutter button half way down to achieve focus. Then, while moving the camera to recompose the shot, I have to somehow keep my finger half way down on the shutter button.

If, during the time it takes me to carefully move the camera to frame the shot most perfectly, I accidentally press a little too hard with my finger, I end up accidentally taking a shot before I intended to.

If I don't press quite hard enough, the shutter button comes up out of the halfway position, and I lose focus and have to start over again.

This happened to me all the time before I "discovered" back button focus. I simply do not have the precise muscle control that is necessary to maintain the proper pressure on a button for a few seconds.

Same for me. I found my keeper rate went up dramatically when using BBF to focus recompose. I found that I had a case of stutterfinger and I was inadvertently refocusing at the last moment.




  
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Tigerkn
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Feb 13, 2013 11:56 |  #30

BBF rule.
Static subject:
If you take a sequence of 10 shots of the same subject from the same distance with the same focus point, with BBF the camera focus ONCE and capture 10 shots. In the same sequence without using BBF, the camera has to focus 10 times to capture 10 shots. Faster = more keeper
Not to mention BBF is awesome for focus and recompose (if you use this practice)

Moving subject:
Set your focus mode to AI Servo, hold you BBF and track the moving subject then fire whenever you want and as many as you want.

I recently did an experiment on a couple events by get away from BBF and I missed it terribly so I am back to stay from now on.


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Back button focusing - When and why?
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