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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 18 Feb 2013 (Monday) 12:43
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Facing my worst nightmare...a gym.

 
jeljohns
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Feb 18, 2013 12:43 |  #1

I was just hired to shoot a fashion show type event for a university. The event is held inside their field house, essentially a large gym. So I'm dealing with artificial light, plus ambient (windows). I'm really nervous about pulling this off. I need some pointers! I do have a flash...should I use it and gel it?




  
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Feb 18, 2013 15:08 |  #2

jeljohns wrote in post #15623762 (external link)
I was just hired to shoot a fashion show type event for a university. The event is held inside their field house, essentially a large gym. So I'm dealing with artificial light, plus ambient (windows). I'm really nervous about pulling this off. I need some pointers! I do have a flash...should I use it and gel it?

If you need to use flash and the equipment is in good working order, this is trivially simple and nothing to fear. This actual flash image came from a Canon 60D and a used Canon 420EX in mixed light.

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
Byte size: ZERO | Content warning: NOT AN IMAGE


Focal Length: 18.0mm
Aperture: f/4.0
Exposure Time: 0.017 s (1/60)
ISO equiv: 400
Exposure Bias: none
Metering Mode: Matrix
Exposure: program (Auto)
White Balance: Auto
Flash Fired: Yes (Auto, return light detected)
Orientation: Normal
Color Space: sRGB

The 60D was set in Program AE autoexposure. As happens with the last few generations of Canon DSLR's and the EX-series Canon speedlites, the camera figured out the exposure automatically.The only adjustment that might be needed is to switch on red-eye reduction.

If flash worries you, you could treat it like a basketball game.

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
Byte size: ZERO | Content warning: NOT AN IMAGE


Focal Length: 70.0mm
Aperture: f/2.8
Exposure Time: 0.0020 s (1/500)
ISO equiv: 6400
Exposure Bias: none
Metering Mode: Partial
Exposure: Manual
Exposure Mode: Manual
White Balance: Manual
Flash Fired: No (enforced)
Orientation: Normal
Color Space: sRGB
Software: Imagenomic Noiseware

This basketball image used settings that were biased toward stopping action.

Or, if there's enough light and you don't need to stop fast action use Program AE and let the camera figure out the exposure.

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
Byte size: ZERO | Content warning: NOT AN IMAGE


Focal Length: 110.0mm
Aperture: f/2.8
Exposure Time: 0.0031 s (1/320)
ISO equiv: 500
Exposure Bias: none
Metering Mode: Matrix
Exposure: shutter priority (semi-auto)
White Balance: Manual
Flash Fired: No (enforced)
Orientation: Normal
Color Space: sRGB


Sometimes, Canon DSLR's know enough about generating images that Program AE is the best choice.



  
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JeffreyG
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Feb 18, 2013 17:23 |  #3

jeljohns wrote in post #15623762 (external link)
I was just hired to shoot a fashion show type event for a university. The event is held inside their field house, essentially a large gym. So I'm dealing with artificial light, plus ambient (windows). I'm really nervous about pulling this off. I need some pointers! I do have a flash...should I use it and gel it?

Given this is a fashion show, I'd be hesitant to try and use the available light as you may have a hell of a time getting faithful color reproduction in the fabrics with vapor discharge lighting.

If the lights are banks of flourescents then you have a better shot, but still the mixed light sources would worry me.

I'd absolutely want to add some flash for this, but as you suspect, gelling it to the right temperature might be a challenge.

Finally - I don't know what the expectations are or what kind of level of pay this is at, but if you really want to nail this then the best possible approach would be to get your hands on a pair of strobes plus triggers and use them to light up the whole space. This solves all of your color temperature and light quality problems.


My personal stuff:http://www.flickr.com/​photos/jngirbach/sets/ (external link)
I use a Canon 5DIII and a Sony A7rIII

  
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JamesDurbinMedia
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Feb 18, 2013 17:24 |  #4

I'd just shoot RAW with the flash and you can adjust the color temperature of the image in post. Just make sure you can expose properly with a flash on the fly or have a flash that is good at ETTL.


J.D
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TooManyShots
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Feb 18, 2013 17:48 as a reply to  @ JamesDurbinMedia's post |  #5
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Here is my 2 cents. It is a fashion show, amateur at best. The ambient light can't be that bad? Two, what is the backdrop of the show? Are people seeing models with a basketball net or other gym equipment as backdrops? If you aren't sure, at least, be prepared somewhat. Get a Flashbender. Two, gel the flash and matching with the ambient light color. Use ISO 1600. Shoot in all manual mode. Shoot close. You can use a longer lens for more subject isolation but you would then need some sort of remote flash. Your flash is less effective if the distance between you and the subject is too great.


One Imaging Photography (external link) and my Flickr (external link)
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watt100
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Feb 18, 2013 18:29 |  #6

jeljohns wrote in post #15623762 (external link)
I was just hired to shoot a fashion show type event for a university. The event is held inside their field house, essentially a large gym. So I'm dealing with artificial light, plus ambient (windows). I'm really nervous about pulling this off. I need some pointers! I do have a flash...should I use it and gel it?

take some test shots but I would say yes, use the flash




  
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jeljohns
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Feb 18, 2013 19:35 |  #7

Yes, it's not a pro fashion show. It's more like a photojournalist situation (there will be lots of other newspapers there). I'll be moving through the crowd to get candid shots, but also am expected to get runway shots. There will be no other lighting other than the gym lights and window light.
I have a 600EX and 5DMKIII, so I'm good on equipment...not so confident about user error (me).
I just don't want to end up with grainy, blurry photos with an orange cast. This seems to be typical of gym shots.




  
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PhotosGuy
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Feb 19, 2013 09:16 |  #8

jeljohns wrote in post #15625314 (external link)
...grainy, blurry photos with an orange cast. This seems to be typical of gym shots.

Taken by people who don't have a clue? You've had some good advice... high ISO, Custom WB, maybe fill flash, & get there early & take some test shots.


FrankC - 20D, RAW, Manual everything...
Classic Carz, Racing, Air Show, Flowers.
Find the light... A few Car Lighting Tips, and MOVE YOUR FEET!
Have you thought about making your own book? // Need an exposure crutch?
New Image Size Limits: Image must not exceed 1600 pixels on any side.

  
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Feb 19, 2013 10:33 |  #9

jeljohns wrote in post #15625314 (external link)
I just don't want to end up with grainy, blurry photos with an orange cast. This seems to be typical of gym shots.

That can be avoided with some preparation, advance work and post processing.

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
Byte size: ZERO | Content warning: NOT AN IMAGE


Camera Maker: Canon
Camera Model: Canon EOS 60D
Lens: 70-200mm
Image Date: 2013-01-08 19:21:07 (no TZ)
Focal Length: 70.0mm
Aperture: f/2.8
Exposure Time: 0.0013 s (1/800)
ISO equiv: 6400
Exposure Bias: none
Metering Mode: Matrix
Exposure: Manual
Exposure Mode: Manual
White Balance: Manual
Flash Fired: No (enforced)
Orientation: Normal
Color Space: sRGB

For this image and many others, the preparation begins with the use of a light meter to get incident readings and accurate exposure The meter is an inexpensive item (external link) that's useful for those who choose not to pay the price of a "real" Sekonic. (external link) Second comes a custom white balance. After using white paper and handkerchiefs for the target, I've switched to another gadget, a cheap Promaster knockoff (external link) of the Expodisc white balance filter.  (external link)The Promaster gadget looks silly, but it works well.

To avoid or at least minimize blurring from the Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 lens, the fastest shutter speed available is chosen. That means using a high ISO of 6400, which also means noisy images, or would mean noisy pictures without a post-processing pass though Imagenomic Noiseware noise reduction software, (external link) used in the above example.

Now, there are many variations on the techniques listed above, but the common point is that you need to prepare for each event. While Canon's Program AE, auto ISO and auto white balance have gotten gradually better over the years, it's still best to show up early at an event that may have indifferent lighting to check on what will be possible, and to learn the best way to adjust the camera - even to learn distances and possible framing under the given circumstances. Showing up at any old time and turning the camera on at the last minute might give you useful results, but an early arrival and advance testing greatly improves the chance of success.



  
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JamesDurbinMedia
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Feb 20, 2013 19:39 |  #10

You have the newest camera and flash that Canon makes. Learn to use them together and you will be fine. That camera shines at high ISO.


J.D
Staff Photographer - Hearst Corporation - Newspaper Division

  
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Facing my worst nightmare...a gym.
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