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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Architecture, Real-Estate & Buildings 
Thread started 15 Jul 2010 (Thursday) 14:37
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A thread for real estate, architectural, and interior design photography

 
TGrundvig
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Feb 23, 2013 14:10 |  #5641

annietex wrote in post #15625991 (external link)
Well, my first advice would be to not strive to achieve Mike Kelley or Tyler Grundvig level quality out of the gate. They are awesome and make a good living at this stuff. Mike is the king of the flash, and Tyler rocks the HDR with a smattering of flash.

I would first read all you can here and on photographyforrealesta​te.net. Then find an agent you can do some free or greatly discounted jobs for to practice. They "good" angles will come naturally the more you shoot and the more you learn.

Make sure and check the market you're getting into, too. I live in north Texas and there are a couple guys who have driven down the pricing to about half of what we "should" get paid. I don't rely on this as my only means of income so it's not huge for me, but it might be for you.

And most of all good luck!

Thanks for the kind words!


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TGrundvig
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Feb 23, 2013 14:16 |  #5642

annietex wrote in post #15631867 (external link)
That's what I use and it's awesome! Lately I've been blending a flashed exposure on top of my merged image and have been very happy with the results. Highly recommended.

Yes, blending in flash frames are key, in my opinion as well. I know several other that also use a combination of multiple exposures and flash frame(s) as well.

Lately, I have been playing with changing all WB to Auto in ACR before blending in SNS-HDR Pro. For the most part, this works very well. It is interesting because in the images a lot of them look too cool, but after blending they come out fine. Throw in a flash frame and the WB gets even more accurate in the final image.

My biggest challenge with multiple exposures is frames. Some shots, five frames is enough, other shots it seems to take up to nine frames. If there is really strong light coming in through a window then you need to bracket the frames closer together to make sure you get enough good data along the windows, but the closer the bracketing the more frames you need to cover the DR. It varies from room to room and even within the same room it varies from one angle to another.


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GadgetRick
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Feb 23, 2013 19:09 |  #5643

TGrundvig wrote in post #15644093 (external link)
Lately, I have been playing with changing all WB to Auto in ACR before blending in SNS-HDR Pro. For the most part, this works very well. It is interesting because in the images a lot of them look too cool, but after blending they come out fine.

I suggest this for sure. I use to kill myself trying to get WB until I started doing this (although I set it to auto in LR and then blend in CS6 but it's the same idea). Makes it much easier to fix it when you do this. Sometimes, however, it just plain doesn't matter. Too many different light sources with too many different temps.




  
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rpaul
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Feb 24, 2013 19:47 |  #5644

So, here we go ... bear in mind, this my very first interior shoot. But lay it on me.

- Blew out the windows because there wasn't really any view. Parking lot and another apartment building.

- The verticals in the corners of the walls are straight, but it seems like as I get closer to the edge of the frame they're not. I can't fix this for the life of me. Is this even fixable?

- All the shadows from the different light sources are killing me. I did some flash shots in addition to the bracketed shots, but I tried to composite them in and it just looks awful. Not sure if I'm doing too much flash or not enough ... guess I should just practice that more.

- The person I shot for covered my costs, so I rented the 17mm TS-E for this. Holy crap, it is magical.

IMAGE: http://robertpaul.smugmug.com/photos/i-Cz3TdBv/0/O/i-Cz3TdBv.jpg

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GadgetRick
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Feb 25, 2013 05:37 |  #5645

rpaul wrote in post #15648234 (external link)
So, here we go ... bear in mind, this my very first interior shoot. But lay it on me.

- Blew out the windows because there wasn't really any view. Parking lot and another apartment building.

- The verticals in the corners of the walls are straight, but it seems like as I get closer to the edge of the frame they're not. I can't fix this for the life of me. Is this even fixable?

- All the shadows from the different light sources are killing me. I did some flash shots in addition to the bracketed shots, but I tried to composite them in and it just looks awful. Not sure if I'm doing too much flash or not enough ... guess I should just practice that more.

- The person I shot for covered my costs, so I rented the 17mm TS-E for this. Holy crap, it is magical.

QUOTED IMAGE

Not bad at all. You want to try to shoot most rooms on an angle rather than straight on like this, however.

Don't worry about the shadows, you're going to have shadows, it's natural.

Also, view or not, you really don't want to blow out the windows. It's terribly distracting and ruins the whole photo.

Overall, very nice for a first try. You did much better than many who are first trying. :)




  
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CameraMan
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Feb 25, 2013 06:06 |  #5646

How much control do you have over the overall clutteryness of a room. In this photo by rpaul it seems awfully cluttered. Can you tell the client to not make it so cluttered looking? I think overall it would make this room look much bigger as well. Are those padded tables or ottomans with the books and flower vases on them?


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rpaul
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Feb 25, 2013 06:32 |  #5647

GadgetRick wrote in post #15649277 (external link)
Not bad at all. You want to try to shoot most rooms on an angle rather than straight on like this, however.

I have another shot at an angle, but I don't like it as much. I'll probably post it when I get to processing it though. The angle I wanted would have shot right into the dining room, but it was a mess at the time.

GadgetRick wrote in post #15649277 (external link)
Don't worry about the shadows, you're going to have shadows, it's natural.

Cool, I felt like they were really distracting.

GadgetRick wrote in post #15649277 (external link)
Also, view or not, you really don't want to blow out the windows. It's terribly distracting and ruins the whole photo.

Fortunately I did take a low enough bracket that I can composite in something less blown out. This better (external link)?

GadgetRick wrote in post #15649277 (external link)
Overall, very nice for a first try. You did much better than many who are first trying. :)

Thanks :D


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ChrisMc73
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Feb 25, 2013 09:09 |  #5648

GadgetRick wrote in post #15630946 (external link)
Most realtors don't want blown-out windows regardless of the view.

Right now, I do a 3-shot bracket then combine them in post. There are a LOT of tools you can use for this. Everyone finds different things work better for them. Believe it or not, I combine mine in CS6. I use a combination of LR3 and CS6 to edit them. Others use HDR software--I have a couple of different packages and have found I like what I'm doing better than using the other tools. That's not to say you can't get great results from the other tools--just look at the other work others have posted for evidence of that.

Again, it's more of a find your style and what works best for you kind of thing.

Rick, which camera do you use for your 3 shot bracket? I have LR4 and PS CS6, but have never used the combine features, guess I'll have to google up some YouTube tutorials on that. But the basic idea is to get an underexposed/correctly exposed/overexposed images and combine them to create a nice looking correctly exposed photo, right?




  
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GadgetRick
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Feb 25, 2013 11:50 |  #5649

rpaul wrote in post #15649355 (external link)
Fortunately I did take a low enough bracket that I can composite in something less blown out. This better (external link)?

Still blown out. Windows are probably the hardest to get right. I'm still trying to improve mine. Some around here (like Tyler) have them nailed. I believe my limitations are more because I only shoot 3 shots and how I process them.




  
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GadgetRick
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Feb 25, 2013 11:53 |  #5650

ChrisMc73 wrote in post #15649692 (external link)
Rick, which camera do you use for your 3 shot bracket? I have LR4 and PS CS6, but have never used the combine features, guess I'll have to google up some YouTube tutorials on that. But the basic idea is to get an underexposed/correctly exposed/overexposed images and combine them to create a nice looking correctly exposed photo, right?

For my RE photography I use a Canon 50d, which is why I only do 3 shots. Without Magic Lantern, it will only do a 3 shot bracket automatically. You can always do more manually I just don't do it.

I just started playing with Combine to HDR from LR and found it does a very good job. I've got other HDR tools but I find this works better for me than the others. Could just be I've been too lazy to learn more about my other tools though. :lol: But don't discount what you can do with that feature in CS6. It does a great job.




  
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TGrundvig
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Feb 26, 2013 17:30 |  #5651

GadgetRick wrote in post #15644851 (external link)
I suggest this for sure. I use to kill myself trying to get WB until I started doing this (although I set it to auto in LR and then blend in CS6 but it's the same idea). Makes it much easier to fix it when you do this. Sometimes, however, it just plain doesn't matter. Too many different light sources with too many different temps.

That is when the flash frame comes into play, throw the flash frame in with the blend and it seems to help a lot.


1Ds Mk II, 1D Mk II, 50D, 40D, XT (for my son), 17-40L, 24-105L, Bigma 50-500 EX DG, Sigma 150 Macro EX DG, Tokina 12-24 AT-X, Nifty Fifty, Tamron 28-300 (for my son), 580ex II, 430ex II

  
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TGrundvig
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Feb 26, 2013 17:37 |  #5652

rpaul wrote in post #15648234 (external link)
So, here we go ... bear in mind, this my very first interior shoot. But lay it on me.

- Blew out the windows because there wasn't really any view. Parking lot and another apartment building.

- The verticals in the corners of the walls are straight, but it seems like as I get closer to the edge of the frame they're not. I can't fix this for the life of me. Is this even fixable?

- All the shadows from the different light sources are killing me. I did some flash shots in addition to the bracketed shots, but I tried to composite them in and it just looks awful. Not sure if I'm doing too much flash or not enough ... guess I should just practice that more.

- The person I shot for covered my costs, so I rented the 17mm TS-E for this. Holy crap, it is magical.

QUOTED IMAGE

I like the overall lighting and the single point perspective is just fine, I use it all the time and my clients love it. But, with this room, there appears to be french doors to the right, I would have shifted over to the right a tad to show more of that wall and less of the left side. Single point perspective is very powerful when shooting interiors, when it works. There are some rooms that won't work, and there are some that do, you just have to play around with it.

I agree with the comment about clutter, it does seem a bit busy in the image. I have run into rooms like this and I found out the stager did it that way, so I shoot it because I've had my butt chewed by enough stagers already that it's not worth the fight. Some of them are quite the Prima Donna.


1Ds Mk II, 1D Mk II, 50D, 40D, XT (for my son), 17-40L, 24-105L, Bigma 50-500 EX DG, Sigma 150 Macro EX DG, Tokina 12-24 AT-X, Nifty Fifty, Tamron 28-300 (for my son), 580ex II, 430ex II

  
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CameraMan
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Feb 26, 2013 17:42 |  #5653

I have a little bit of a dilemma here. I was asked by a bank to photograph this house about 3 hours ago. I know of the house. I know it's condition. It's been sitting half completed for about 10 years. No windows, doors, nothing. Just exterior walls and a finished roof. My belief is that since the roof is finished then the inside should be structurally sound. Then I think of the storms we've had and are the supports inside this house going to hold it up much longer?

While I'd love the opportunity to go inside and take photos of the interior of this monstrosity, my only concern is will it be safe to do so?


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TGrundvig
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Feb 26, 2013 17:42 |  #5654

GadgetRick wrote in post #15650225 (external link)
For my RE photography I use a Canon 50d, which is why I only do 3 shots. Without Magic Lantern, it will only do a 3 shot bracket automatically. You can always do more manually I just don't do it.

I just started playing with Combine to HDR from LR and found it does a very good job. I've got other HDR tools but I find this works better for me than the others. Could just be I've been too lazy to learn more about my other tools though. :lol: But don't discount what you can do with that feature in CS6. It does a great job.

Magic Lantern should let you do 9 frames in AEB.


1Ds Mk II, 1D Mk II, 50D, 40D, XT (for my son), 17-40L, 24-105L, Bigma 50-500 EX DG, Sigma 150 Macro EX DG, Tokina 12-24 AT-X, Nifty Fifty, Tamron 28-300 (for my son), 580ex II, 430ex II

  
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TGrundvig
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Feb 26, 2013 17:44 |  #5655

CameraMan wrote in post #15655479 (external link)
I have a little bit of a dilemma here. I was asked by a bank to photograph this house about 3 hours ago. I know of the house. I know it's condition. It's been sitting half completed for about 10 years. No windows, doors, nothing. Just exterior walls and a finished roof. My belief is that since the roof is finished then the inside should be structurally sound. Then I think of the storms we've had and are the supports inside this house going to hold it up much longer?

While I'd love the opportunity to go inside and take photos of the interior of this monstrosity, my only concern is will it be safe to do so?

10 years? No way I would go in there. The interior has been exposed to the elements too much and for all you know termites could have been going at it most of that time as well. I would not enter it, but that is me.


1Ds Mk II, 1D Mk II, 50D, 40D, XT (for my son), 17-40L, 24-105L, Bigma 50-500 EX DG, Sigma 150 Macro EX DG, Tokina 12-24 AT-X, Nifty Fifty, Tamron 28-300 (for my son), 580ex II, 430ex II

  
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