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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing 
Thread started 26 Feb 2013 (Tuesday) 12:50
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How to Enlarge Photo and Print 24 x 36 inches

 
General_T
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Feb 26, 2013 12:50 |  #1

Hi,

Does anyone know of a "How To" guide to take a photo (shot in RAW on a 5D mk3) and make a 24" wide by 36" long poster out of it? Or talk me through it?

The native size of the photo appears to be in a 16:9 format, from the camera, so I guess I would have to crop it first to get 24x36 format?

The RAW file was shot large - so is there enough resolution to be able to blow it up to 24x36 inches?

I have Photoshop and Lightroom, if someone could help me get through the process of getting the photo enlarged and sized properly it would be greatly appreciated.

I was planning on printing it out on an HP Designjet T1100ps plotter/printer.


Thanks for any help


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Voaky999
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Feb 26, 2013 13:00 |  #2

The native size out of the camera should be 3:2 which corresponds exactly to the proportions of 36" by 24". Unless you changed the proportions in the camera to a 16:9 format than you will have to crop to a 3:2 proportion. The HP plotter may have an optimum PPI that it likes best, check the manual. Most of the Epsons I have had like 240-300 PPI.


Don
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Lowner
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Feb 26, 2013 13:40 |  #3

I've printed as low as 200 ppi with no ill effects, but when looking at a large image the viewer tends not to be standing inches from the image but farther away, so printing at a lower ppi is probably OK.


Richard

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tonylong
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Feb 26, 2013 13:52 |  #4

As was said, if you did not crop the original image then you have an aspect ratio out of the camera that will "match" your desire for a 24x36 print.

That being the case, the "simplest" approach would be to just use the Lightroom Export function. The questions will be:

1) How does the driver handle files that have a ppi resolution "tag" of various values? The driver may or may not "care" -- Lightroom by default sets a value of something like 240 or 250 ppi (you can change this). For many printer drivers this tag doesn't matter as long as you don't resize to a specific dimension in inches at a given ppi/resolution. You'll want to find out for the specific printer (maybe run a test if you can't find info in the printer docs)

2) How does the printer/driver handle files/images that don't "match" the print size you want? In other words, if you send a file and tell the printer to print at 24x36 and the actual/original image has a resolution that would produce that image at, say, 200 ppi (which would be a pixel resolution of 4800x7200 pixels) would the printer properly handle that job, by resampling the image to a proper resolution internally (most digital printers can do this)? If it can handle it, then for your purposes you may be happy to let the print driver do its job. However, if you have any doubt about this, then you can, in the LR Export dialog, tell LR to Resize/resample the image to a specific print size and a specific resolution. So for example for your job, specifying 24x36 Inches at 300 ppi will produce a resized image file that would meet the common "standard" for print resolution.

3) Then, the HP Export dialog has settings for "output sharpening" where you can specify both a "target" and an amount. For printing, you can choose either Matte or Glossy paper as a "target" and then an amount. There is a difference in how Matte and Glossy "targets" are rendered. I'd advise you to run some small test prints to get a look and feel of different settings between doing a "final" big print. Another thing that has come up here is that for the Lightroom output sharpening for a print, the ppi tag does matter. It has been "reported" that the developers set print sharpening (using a higher ppi "value") differently than sharpening for screen (a lower ppi "value"). Because of this, it has been advised that if you are preparing specifically for print that you ensure that your ppi "tag" is at a relatively high value. I'm not sure of what the "lower" bound is, maybe someone who knows can chip in...?

4) The last thing I'll chime in with is whether you want "full control" of all this, by doing your own resizing of the image and then "tweaking" the results yourself. If so, the best option could be to Edit in Photoshop, use the Image Size dialog where you can set the size in inches and the resolution/ppi to say 300 ppi and specify in the dialog that PS should resample the image to that size/resolution. Then, you can take the final image and do things like output sharpening. You can do this in PS using one of the "fancy tools", or just Save (and Close) the image so that you can work on the saved copy in Lightroom (it will automatically show up in your library/catalog)

If all of this is "over your head", then you should stop and "read up" on digital printing! Look in the FAQ "sticky" at the top of the section "page" here and also check out the "Beginners' Guide" sticky:

https://photography-on-the.net …/showthread.php​?t=1132002

Hope this helps a bit!


Tony
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General_T
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Feb 27, 2013 12:50 |  #5

Hi,

Thanks for the replies. I will use the above info as I try to print.

The 3 x 2 size is in the wrong orientation ie I want it 2' wide by 3' high.


Thanks Again


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tonylong
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Feb 27, 2013 13:22 |  #6

General_T wrote in post #15658136 (external link)
Hi,

Thanks for the replies. I will use the above info as I try to print.

The 3 x 2 size is in the wrong orientation ie I want it 2' wide by 3' high.

Thanks Again

OK, hold it, are you saying that the image needs to be "flipped" to its "side", or that the original image was shot/framed in the "wrong orientation" and needs to be cropped to the 2:3 aspect ratio meaning you'd need to crop a bunch of "stuff" off?


Tony
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René ­ Damkot
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Feb 28, 2013 16:11 |  #7

A 5D3 gives 5760 x 3840 pixels.
That is a 19" wide print at 300 ppi.
A 36" wide print will be 160 ppi, which will be absolutely fine for most subject matter and typical viewing distance (or even a lot closer).

So: Just shoot, edit and print.
If the file has the wrong orientation: Rotate camera & reshoot.;)


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Wallace ­ River
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Feb 28, 2013 16:23 |  #8

René Damkot wrote in post #15662303 (external link)
If the file has the wrong orientation: Rotate camera & reshoot.;)

Hoping the original shot wasn't of an Ivory-billed woodpecker flying through an eclipse of the sun.;)


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BigAl007
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Mar 01, 2013 02:30 |  #9

With 3840 pixels on the short edge of a 5DIII that is still nearly 300 pixels more than my20D or 800 more than my 300D has on the long edge. There are many thousands of 24x36 (or 36x24) prints from these cameras hanging in galleries around the world. Producing a 2:3 ratio crop from the full hight of a 5DIII image will still (resize and) print fine.

It is only us retentive photographers that really notice (or can tell) the difference. Most of the people I know would think anyting starting out at around 100ppi looks great.

Alan


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Edsport
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Mar 01, 2013 06:32 |  #10

Just rotate the photo and print. If in the future you need to crop to a certain dimension just open the photo in photoshop, click on the crop tool and up top you should see 2 boxes, one for width and one for height. Type this for example - 24 in and 36 in and now when you crop, the photo will be those dimensions...


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How to Enlarge Photo and Print 24 x 36 inches
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