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Thread started 26 Feb 2013 (Tuesday) 13:57
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protecting camera while on water?

 
nekrosoft13
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Feb 26, 2013 13:57 |  #1
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Anyone kayaking or canoeing with their slr?
What is a good reliable and chea. Way to protect your camera?


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maverick75
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Feb 26, 2013 13:59 |  #2

The cheap way to do it is to get a waterproof point and shoot.
The waterproof housings often cost more than the camera bodies do for DSLRs.


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Todd ­ Lambert
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Feb 26, 2013 14:02 |  #3

You want completely waterproof, or ohh shît, I dropped my camera in the water, oh, it's okay! -- ?

I mean, large zip lock back work well in a pinch (I have one in my camera bag at all time).

There are drybags made for kayaking, that's probably where I'd start if you need something more than a ziplock.




  
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StillCrazy
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Feb 26, 2013 14:16 |  #4

I've had the same question, and I haven't figured it out yet. The way I see it, I'll buy a pelican case for about $80 to hold my camera, and lenses, while I'm paddling around. I'll stow it in the kayak hold and take it out when I get to where I'm going. As for shooting from the boat, I don't know yet. Last year I was getting into the yak, sat on the edge of the gunwale, and flipped over. Duh! My P&S took a bath, but it still works today.


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maverick75
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Mar 01, 2013 21:54 |  #5

Looks to be promising:

http://fstoppers.com …le-underwater-housing-kit (external link)


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DantheCanonMan
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Mar 02, 2013 04:18 |  #6

Yeah, if you're going kayaking with an SLR you need a Pelican case.




  
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Forest
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Mar 02, 2013 08:31 as a reply to  @ DantheCanonMan's post |  #7

I am going to go advocate against what appears to be the popular opinion so far...

The first thing to consider is if you want to take pictures while kayaking or canoeing or if you are looking to transport your gear to an end destination. If you are simply looking to transport equipment then a pelican box can't be beat (although they are not especially cheap).

If you plan on frequently using your camera, especially while in a kayak, I don't think that pelican cases are the best option. On most kayaks you would need to secure the case on top of the boat which makes accessing the camera much more risky and exposes all of your equipment at the same time.

In a kayak, my preferred method is to set the camera between my legs and on top of a dry bag. This allows easy and secure access to the camera which can be quickly placed in the dry bag if needed. Additional lenses are usually stored in cases in another dry bag strapped to the kayak.

How you choose to store your camera will likely depend on how comfortable and confident you are handling a boat. Photographing wildlife in particular from a kayak often offers unique perspectives and opportunities that greatly outweigh the risks in my opinion. Through years of kayaking with a DSLR I have never damaged any equipment while kayaking (although extra care is definitely warranted).


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StillCrazy
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Mar 02, 2013 09:09 |  #8

Forest wrote in post #15667945 (external link)
The first thing to consider is if you want to take pictures while kayaking or canoeing or if you are looking to transport your gear to an end destination. If you are simply looking to transport equipment then a pelican box can't be beat (although they are not especially cheap).

In a kayak, my preferred method is to set the camera between my legs and on top of a dry bag. This allows easy and secure access to the camera which can be quickly placed in the dry bag if needed. Additional lenses are usually stored in cases in another dry bag strapped to the kayak.

You raise some good points, and thanks for lending your experience. My intent for using the pelican case is solely for transport to, and from, a destination, not for use while shooting, so there we are in agreement.

The big problem is safely shooting from the boat. Unfortunately, my yak will not allow resting the camera on deck, as it is SitOnTop, SOT, style kayak. There is always water in the cockpit, so I cannot keep the camera there. It would have to be enclosed in a dry bag at all times, which makes quick shots impossible. My canoe is a lot dryer, but paddling a canoe is too slow and inefficient.

The Outex Underwater Housing looks promising, but at $375, way too expensive.


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Forest
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Mar 02, 2013 10:14 |  #9

StillCrazy wrote in post #15668047 (external link)
The big problem is safely shooting from the boat. Unfortunately, my yak will not allow resting the camera on deck, as it is SitOnTop, SOT, style kayak. There is always water in the cockpit, so I cannot keep the camera there. It would have to be enclosed in a dry bag at all times, which makes quick shots impossible. My canoe is a lot dryer, but paddling a canoe is too slow and inefficient.

Most of my experience comes with sit-in kayaks, so I haven't had to deal with all of the same issues... One solution that might be worth looking at is a Watershed camera drybag (external link). I haven't used their padded liners (or found a reason to justify buying one as of yet), but the quality of their drybags is top notch. They use what I can only describe as a large rubber zip-closure and the top can rolled up for further protection. Its not instantaneous access, but I think it would be one of the quicker solutions. In your case I would say you could probably keep in the cockpit (even if there are several inches of water) and pull out your camera as needed.

Edit: I should add they run $130-150 for a full kit depending on the size.


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Mar 02, 2013 12:20 as a reply to  @ Forest's post |  #10

I carried my analog stuff for years in the seakayak cockpit using an Ortlieb Aquazoom camera bag and took shots from the kayak with a moderate zoom, but the bag often felt in the way on longer open water crossings between islands when I had choppy seas and had to focus on balancing the kayak properly.

Today, with the digital stuff I pack what I need in a B&W case (similar to Pelican) in the aft hatch and shoot when I get on land again. On fairly quiet seas I have been trying to use one roll bag packed into the other and noticed that water never reached the inside of the second bag, but it is a pain to take the camera out. Once out though it felt quite good to handle the camera safely after I had got a paddlefloat on each paddle end for stability. That in turn reduces maneuverability greatly but can help if you want to get a few shots of a seal playing the lazy banana part on a flat rock just in front of you. With any fast-moving subject, or with the wind/current making you shift from your intended course, you've had it.




  
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Nightdiver13
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Mar 02, 2013 14:35 |  #11

Forest wrote in post #15668232 (external link)
Most of my experience comes with sit-in kayaks, so I haven't had to deal with all of the same issues... One solution that might be worth looking at is a Watershed camera drybag (external link). I haven't used their padded liners (or found a reason to justify buying one as of yet), but the quality of their drybags is top notch. They use what I can only describe as a large rubber zip-closure and the top can rolled up for further protection. Its not instantaneous access, but I think it would be one of the quicker solutions. In your case I would say you could probably keep in the cockpit (even if there are several inches of water) and pull out your camera as needed.

Edit: I should add they run $130-150 for a full kit depending on the size.

I can vouch for the Watershed bags as well. I use an Ocoee with the padded camera insert while whitewater kayaking. It protects all the stuff perfectly from getting soaked and bashed around inside my boat. It's also much easier to fit within your boat versus the rigid square format of Pelican cases (of course not an issue if you're stashing on the deck).


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nekrosoft13
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Mar 05, 2013 13:35 |  #12
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Forest wrote in post #15668232 (external link)
Most of my experience comes with sit-in kayaks, so I haven't had to deal with all of the same issues... One solution that might be worth looking at is a Watershed camera drybag (external link). I haven't used their padded liners (or found a reason to justify buying one as of yet), but the quality of their drybags is top notch. They use what I can only describe as a large rubber zip-closure and the top can rolled up for further protection. Its not instantaneous access, but I think it would be one of the quicker solutions. In your case I would say you could probably keep in the cockpit (even if there are several inches of water) and pull out your camera as needed.

Edit: I should add they run $130-150 for a full kit depending on the size.


That looks good. Which one excactly do you have?


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Harpo63
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Mar 05, 2013 13:46 |  #13

Ah, this topic came up sometime last year either here or elsewhere, but one of the links went to a professional photographer who specializes in photography from his kayak. (He is featured often in kayaking magazines on the west coast) This outfitter in Alaska has the recommended dry bag that they found did the best job in keeping their gear dry and easy to access/put away… Cam dry Bag (external link)


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2mnycars
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Mar 06, 2013 09:35 |  #14

As a long-time pro ski instructor I often packed gear that affected my enjoyment of skiing. I was slow to realize--was I there to ski or there to do photography? Answering that showed me whether I needed to pack pro gear that was large and heavy, or not.
What do you intend to do with the images?
We have canoed a lot. Pelican cases have their place. However, once the gear is in there, I sure can't respond in a hurry if I have a photographic opportunity.
Can you get satisfactory images (for your purpose) with lesser gear?


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Mar 06, 2013 16:44 as a reply to  @ 2mnycars's post |  #15

When I go kayaking or snorkeling, I leave the DSLR at home and take the Canon Powershot D10. It only takes JPGs, but it works great to get some underwater shots, as well as on the beach. And it does video reasonably well.


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protecting camera while on water?
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