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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Birds 
Thread started 15 Mar 2013 (Friday) 20:28
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andrewhuxman
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Mar 17, 2013 19:07 |  #16

Great captures Rog,you are indeed fortunate to get a White Morph..Awesome.


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ardeekay
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Mar 18, 2013 09:38 |  #17

bettyn wrote in post #15724481 (external link)
Great captures of a white morph and a regular Reddish Egret.

You are too kind, Betty, but thank you.

porkphoto wrote in post #15725280 (external link)
Snowy Egret would have dark legs and yellow feet...the clincher for me...its a white morph or leucistic Reddish Egret. I would lean toward a leucistic Reddish Egret.

OK, Pork, good to know. Now I just wish he'd been closer or I would have done a better job. But now I'm going to have to look up "leucistic". Thank you.


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ardeekay
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Mar 18, 2013 09:39 |  #18

andrewhuxman wrote in post #15726007 (external link)
Great captures Rog,you are indeed fortunate to get a White Morph..Awesome.

Well, you keep finding the birds in my home state that I never seem to spot, so I had to come up w/ something to earn my stripes-hee, hee. Thanks for looking in, Andrew.


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Markmcc
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Mar 19, 2013 07:19 |  #19

"I would lean toward a leucistic Reddish Egret." Out of curiosity, why would you call this a leucisitic Reddish Egret rather than a white morph? The white morph is fairly common along the Texas coast. We do bird surveys in far south Texas (Laguna Atascosa NWR) and there are places where 40% of the Reddish Egrets are white morph. As you move up the Texas Coast the percentage drops, but they are never really uncommon.

Mark




  
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porkphoto
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Mar 19, 2013 11:36 |  #20

Markmcc wrote in post #15731310 (external link)
"I would lean toward a leucistic Reddish Egret." Out of curiosity, why would you call this a leucisitic Reddish Egret rather than a white morph? The white morph is fairly common along the Texas coast. We do bird surveys in far south Texas (Laguna Atascosa NWR) and there are places where 40% of the Reddish Egrets are white morph. As you move up the Texas Coast the percentage drops, but they are never really uncommon.

Mark

The term "white morph" is used quite often when referring to pale or light colored birds. A few years ago when I started doing bird photography not knowing that term I "googled" white morph and did not get any definition. However when I googled leucistic, a term I also heard used often, there was a definition and it referred to the organism's inability to produce pigment. Its been a few years ago so as the term or words are used more often it might have been added in the dictionary since. Perhaps an ornithologist might give us a better view on things.




  
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Nighthound
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Mar 19, 2013 12:30 |  #21

Leucism is reduced pigmentation, Albinism is total absence of pigmentation. A White Morph does have pigmentation which is apparent in its bill, legs and eyes. The question that I would ask is if two White Morph Reddish Egrets produce young, will all of the young be exactly like their parents? Or will there be "standard Reddish Egret" coloration in the genetic make up resulting in both mixed coloration and duplicates of the parents. I guess what I'm wondering is the White Morph a "fixed" genetic coloration or is it simply a degree of Leucism? I'd like to hear from a Geneticist about this, I'm not finding any definitive answers in my research.

I've seen and photographed the genetic offspring of a White Morph but not having seen the bird's parents there's no way to be sure if one or both were White Morph. If the coloration of White Morph is a recessive gene then I suppose both parents could be Standard Reddish, with one or both carrying the recessive White Morph gene. The bird I photographed had a mix of white and standard plumage. This is an interesting subject, I hope some one comes along with knowledge in this area.


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Markmcc
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Mar 19, 2013 15:17 |  #22

It might be useful to know that "morph" is the shortened version of "Polymorphism" which refers to variations of plumage that have no relationship to sex or age. For instance, a first year Little Blue Heron is white, but this is not a "morph" since all Little Blue Herons go through this phase. Just as the color difference between a mature male and female Painted Bunting is not a "morph" since all females are green, while mature males are red, green, and blue.

But in Eastern Screech-Owls, there is a gray morph and a red morph. These are two distinctly different color patterns that occur across the species. Snow Goose is another good example of a common "morph", in that the "Blue morph" is quite common. Likewise many hawks have various morphs, as does the Reddish Egret.

In Leucism, normal patterns are visible, but all plumage is paler than normal. Leucism is considered an aberrant plumage, and is quite rare.

Mark




  
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J.Litton
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Mar 19, 2013 15:53 |  #23

There is actually a half white morph, half regular reddish I am going to try to get some pictures of in the next few weeks.


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