Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 22 Mar 2013 (Friday) 10:13
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

EOS 7D hints and tips

 
botty1963
Hatchling
2 posts
Joined Mar 2013
     
Mar 22, 2013 10:13 |  #1

Hi, after 5 years using a 400D my lovely wife bought me a 7D completely out of the blue - to say I was rather pleased would be an understatement. Anyway, I've had a quick read through the manual, watched various Youtube clips and scanned a few websites - and of course this forum. So, what are your best tips, what do you feel are it's best features, are there any problems to look out for etc etc. I'm only a hobbyist so 'pro information' might go straight over me head;)




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
XBAMBOBEE
Goldmember
Avatar
1,283 posts
Gallery: 12 photos
Likes: 41
Joined Dec 2012
Location: IN THE FAST LANE
     
Mar 22, 2013 10:25 |  #2

Avoid using the 19point AF and Zone AF...they are not efficient as the canon tutorials claim.
Go out and practice shooting fast moving subjects if at all its your area of interest...;)


2 Legit 2 Quit

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
aladyforty
Goldmember
Avatar
3,770 posts
Gallery: 397 photos
Best ofs: 4
Likes: 4495
Joined Dec 2005
Location: Albany: Western Australia
     
Mar 22, 2013 10:31 |  #3

look up someone on here called teamspeed, he is very helpful with the 7D from my experience


5DIII 7DII Fuji X100 Fuji X10 17-40L 135L 70-200F4ISL Tamron 150-600
My Flickr https://www.flickr.com​/photos/25426422@N00/ (external link)
Birding page (archives cant add to them, lost password) https://www.flickr.com​/photos/59111660@N08/ (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
mrbtd
Senior Member
418 posts
Joined Nov 2009
Location: Lindenhurst, IL
     
Mar 22, 2013 10:34 |  #4

https://photography-on-the.net …t=768556&highli​ght=7d+faq




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Craign
Goldmember
Avatar
1,188 posts
Gallery: 11 photos
Likes: 43
Joined Mar 2010
Location: Kentucky
     
Mar 22, 2013 10:39 |  #5

I have never found one site or one person's advice to be exactly what was best for me when searching for "how to" advice. Combining bits and pieces from different view points has been more successful.

Go to a jewelry store, it is your turn for the next family surprise.


Canon 7D Mark II w/Canon BG-E16 Battery Grip; Canon EOS 50D w/Canon Battery Grip; Canon SL1; Tokina 12mm - 24mm f/4 PRO DX II; Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS; Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS; Canon 70-300mm f/4-5.6L IS; Sigma 85mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM; Canon EF 300mm f/4L IS; Canon EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM; Canon Extender EF 1.4x II; Canon Extender EF 2x II; Canon Speedlite 430EX II Flash
Image Editing Okay

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
botty1963
THREAD ­ STARTER
Hatchling
2 posts
Joined Mar 2013
     
Mar 22, 2013 10:47 |  #6

XBAMBOBEE wrote in post #15743095 (external link)
Go out and practice shooting fast moving subjects if at all its your area of interest...;)

It certainly is https://plus.google.co​m …687428988292373​864/albums (external link)

I have lots of other photos online as we go on a lot of hiking holidays, so my main interests are both rugby and hiking, therefore the 8fps/high ISO is great for my sport photos. I'm still using EF-S lenses so not yet upgraded to L-Series, they're for another day...

Thanks all for the advice




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
XBAMBOBEE
Goldmember
Avatar
1,283 posts
Gallery: 12 photos
Likes: 41
Joined Dec 2012
Location: IN THE FAST LANE
     
Mar 22, 2013 13:13 |  #7

botty1963 wrote in post #15743164 (external link)
It certainly is https://plus.google.co​m …687428988292373​864/albums (external link)

I have lots of other photos online as we go on a lot of hiking holidays, so my main interests are both rugby and hiking, therefore the 8fps/high ISO is great for my sport photos. I'm still using EF-S lenses so not yet upgraded to L-Series, they're for another day...

Thanks all for the advice

If you have an opportunity to rent a 70-200mm L lens from a local camera store, do it...You will be impressed with how fast your focusing will be when tracking your subjects and the overall image quality will give you a big grin on your face.;)


2 Legit 2 Quit

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Copidosoma
Goldmember
1,017 posts
Gallery: 5 photos
Likes: 68
Joined Jul 2009
Location: Edmonton AB, Canada
     
Mar 22, 2013 13:18 as a reply to  @ XBAMBOBEE's post |  #8

Shoot RAW

Open files in DPP.

Set sharpness to 2

Then process as you normally do.


Gear: 7DII | 6D | Fuji X100s |Sigma 24A, 50A, 150-600C |24-105L |Samyang 14 2.8|Tamron 90mm f2.8 |and some other stuff
http://www.shutterstoc​k.com/g/copidosoma (external link)
https://500px.com/chri​s_kolaczan (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Snydremark
my very own Lightrules moment
18,222 posts
Gallery: 44 photos
Likes: 1322
Joined Mar 2009
Location: Issaquah, WA USA
     
Mar 22, 2013 13:58 |  #9

Spot AF is good for shooting through a lot of branches, etc, to get subjects behind intervening objects; it is not good for 'regular' shooting, as it does cause a bit of inaccuracy under normal conditions.

Use the AI Server delay setting to speed up or slow down how quickly the camera attempts to reacquire focus on your subject if your AF point moves off of it while panning. Slowing it down will keep it from jumping, immediately, to the next thing under the active AF point; speeding it up will make it jump sooner. This helps in panning when the subject moves behind posts, players, cars, etc.


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
"The easiest way to improve your photos is to adjust the loose nut between the shutter release and the ground."

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Scrumhalf
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
6,216 posts
Gallery: 36 photos
Likes: 3309
Joined Jul 2012
Location: Portland OR USA
     
Mar 22, 2013 14:41 |  #10

Read Teamspeed's ETTR instructions (in his signature, just search the forum for him).

I liked Doug Klosterman's e-book. It is only 10 bucks on Amazon, I thought it was a good read.

Also, these two links had very good information on how to set up back button focusing and an empirical analysis of 7D off-center focus point behavior, respectively. Very useful.

http://www.deepgreenph​otography.com …ing-up-your-new-canon-7d/ (external link)

http://blogs.stonestep​s.ca/showpost.aspx?pid​=54 (external link)


Sam
5D4 | 6D | 7D2 (2 bodies) | Reasonably good glass
Gear List

flickr (external link)
If I don't get the shots I want with the gear I have, the only optics I need to examine is the mirror on the bathroom wall. The root cause will be there.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Lincolnshire ­ Poacher
Member
115 posts
Joined May 2011
Location: Lincolnshire, UK
     
Mar 22, 2013 14:55 |  #11

ETTR

Ok that is "Expose To The Right" is the best advice I can give. The 7D is a superb bit of kit, but the images from it do not react well to pushing exposure in PP. If you try it, you will get noise.

My 7D is almost always set to +2/3 exposure compensation and my shots tend to be far less noisy compared to a neutral setting.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Scrumhalf
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
6,216 posts
Gallery: 36 photos
Likes: 3309
Joined Jul 2012
Location: Portland OR USA
     
Mar 22, 2013 15:08 |  #12

Make sure your blinking highlights are turned on in settings. Push exposure until you're barely blowing whites. That should give you raw images that are well ettr'ed.


Sam
5D4 | 6D | 7D2 (2 bodies) | Reasonably good glass
Gear List

flickr (external link)
If I don't get the shots I want with the gear I have, the only optics I need to examine is the mirror on the bathroom wall. The root cause will be there.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
mmcguire
Senior Member
273 posts
Likes: 17
Joined Jun 2010
Location: Sacramento, CA
     
Mar 22, 2013 15:12 |  #13

I agree avoid the 19point and zone autofocus go with spot, single point, or single point expansion.

http://photographywisd​om.com …modes-explained-1292.html (external link)




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Arte ­ Automobilistica
Senior Member
308 posts
Likes: 2
Joined Oct 2010
Location: Devon UK
     
Mar 22, 2013 15:53 |  #14

I was/thought I was having focus problems shooting motor sports. I found this interesting

Also
https://photography-on-the.net …/index.php/t-1134233.html

Particularly amfoto1 who said:

I've been using a pair of 7Ds for a bit over two years now and have had to learn how to get sharp images out of them... there are a few tricks.

1.Yep. The images are softer due to the strong AA filter on the sensor. Images require considerably more sharpening than any other Canon DSLR I've used (probably around 10 or 12 different models, over the years). For example, 50D have almost as much resolution with 15MP APS-C sensor, but I find 7D images need 40% to 80% more sharpening. The detail is hiding in there, and sharpening brings it out. RAW images in particular will require stronger sharpening. But even if shooting JPEGs, you may need to set stronger in-camera sharpening, unless you plan to apply it in post-processing instead (which might be a good idea if you plan to change the size of the image). I have not had opportunity to closely compare the other 18MP cameras (60D, T2i/550D, T3i/600D) with 7D... If they don't need as much sharpening, I'd just suspect they use a weaker AA filter and/or are applying more sharpening to the files in-camera. The other 18MP cameras came after the 7D and Canon might have "tweaked" the sensor and/or algorythms a bit.

2. If you have a filter on the lens, remove it. The very high resolution of the 7D is super critical of any flaws with lens or any optics in front of it.

3. Bump your shutter speed up... the high resolution of the camera also is more sensitive to even the least amount of camera shake. Canon has a white paper about this, on one or the other of their websites, that explains how the ultra dense sensors are more sensitive to slight movement. By default, I try to use 1/200 and 1/400 with 7D, where I use 1/100 and even slower with 5DII, 50D, etc. Note: The 7D sensor has more than twice the pixels per square mm than the 5DII's does.

4. Use an optimal aperture. Stop down a bit and don't be fooled by slight loss of sharpness that most lenses exhibit wide open. Depending upon the lens, f5.6 to f8 will usually give better results. But don't get carried away... Diffraction starts to set in with 7D's crowded sensor at around f7.1. That causes loss of fine detail which might be mistaken for "softness", too. You won't see it much at f8, very little at f11, but it starts to become apparent at f16 and smaller apertures. I suggest shooting a group of test shots with your particular lenses, of a highly detailed, flat subject (the classic brick wall or newspaper taped to a wall). Learn the optimal apertures of your particular lenses, and how much loss you can expect at larger or smaller apertures.

5. Between the need to use higher shutter speed and smaller apertures, you might need to use a higher ISO. I use 200 and 400 minimum usually with 7D. It also is good to do this because 7D's low ISOs are less noise free than some other cameras (but I find it's high ISO about one stop more usable than, say, 50D).

6. Be practical about your expectations. Particularly if coming from a significantly lower resolution camera, you might be in the habit of inspecting your shots at 100%, which is almost silly with a much larger image file from 7D. That's like looking at a 5 foot wide print from 18" away, viewing a 7D image at 100% on many computer monitors (even worse on lower resolution monitors). Will you really be printing the image that large and viewing it from such a close distance? Back off on the magnification. Also make an actual print... preferably with a good printer and on smooth, matte paper to see what you are actually getting. At best your computer monitor is around 96 pixels per inch, while most inkjets use at least 240 ppi and some printers use 300 or even 400 ppi. You might find yourself down-rezzing a 7D image to make a common print size, where you were having to up-rez it or print it at it's native resolution before, with a lower resolution camera.

7. Avoid underexposure, which makes for muddy images that tend to look soft. Also, contrast and the type of lighting being used can effect apparent sharpness in an image. Compact fluorescent lighting is becoming common, and is a pretty awful light source for photography. Common household types of fluorescent lighting even can cause focus errors... though it probably even more often causes exposure problems (due to the light cycling). There are photography-optimized/stabilized CFLs and fluorescent tube lighting available, but they are comparatively expensive.

8. Sure, use focus Micro Adjust to fine tune the camera to your particular lenses... but be aware of it's limitations. For example, you can only set one correction factor for a lens, and that might not be accurate across the entire range of focal lengths of a zoom. You probably should test a zoom at 2 or 3 different focal lengths, then either arrive at an average that's as close as possible or set a biased correction for whatever focal length you tend to use most with that particular lens.

9. There are different ways to do MA, too... Some may be more accurate than others, some folks might find one type of test more convenient and effecive to use than another... To be more or less repeatible. And be sure you are doing it right, at appropriate distances (for example, Canon recommends the target be 50X the lens focal length from the camera's image plane... so a 50mm lens would use a target that's 2500mm away, or a little over 8 feet). Use a tripod, make sure your target is parallel with the sensor or set up at the proper angle (depending upon the type of target and testing method you are using). To eliminate any possibility of camera shake, use mirror lockup and either a remote release or the camera's self timer so you don't have to press the shutter release button during the test.

10. Learn the focus methods and tweaks of the camera so that you can avoid some of the common focus errors, which make images look quite soft. The 7D's AF system is complex and highly customizable. This allows us to set the camera up for specific situations, to get very good results. But it also opens up many opportunities to set it up wrong and get worse results than we'd get with a "less capable" camera.

Finally, stop worrying about it so much. Really... Go out and shoot, then make some prints. That's really what will show you how well the camera can do. No camera is perfect... I do get some small percentage of images ruined by missed focus or camera shake or general softness from atmospheric effects or flare... mostly "user error", but some of them are camera misses too, I'm sure. I throw those away... Clients never even see them. My percentage of "bad" shots has gone down considerably as I've practiced with the cameras and gotten better using them. I do editing and post-processing: Lightroom for quick edits & minor adjustments to make initial thumbnails, and Photoshop to more fully finish images prior to use. Now after a couple years using them, I've sold hundreds or perhaps even thousands of images made with 7D and not one single customer has ever commented that an image from my cameras appears soft.


NelPhotos.co.uk (external link)
Work: 7D + Sigma 100-300 4
Play: Kiss X4 + 15-85 IS + 10-22 + 50 1.8 II + Vivitar 1 70-210 3.5
EOS-M + 18-55 + FD 50 1.4 + FD 135 2.8 + Tamron 35-80 1A
G9, SX280 HS + CHDK, Casio EX-FH 100, Toshiba L505-144 & iPad 2

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Mark ­ II
Goldmember
Avatar
2,153 posts
Likes: 15
Joined Mar 2009
Location: Texas
     
Mar 22, 2013 16:17 |  #15

Use "Back button" focus with Center focal point only!
In my opinion, this is best for all Canon EOS's.


1DX7D - 40D IR converted Sony RX100,
Canon 85 L II, EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II, EF 24-105L, 16-35mm f/2.8 II L, 100L & 60mm Macro , Fisheye EF 15mm f2.8, Tokina 10-17

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

9,960 views & 0 likes for this thread
EOS 7D hints and tips
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is lipartyrides
389 guests, 260 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 6430, that happened on Dec 03, 2017

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.