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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 22 Mar 2013 (Friday) 12:31
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B&W *FILM ONLY* Photography

 
JessicaLynn22
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Mar 22, 2013 12:31 |  #1

I am currently shooting photographs with a canon 35mm SLR camera, this is the first time doing film (since digital has taken over) - anyways, I am posting because I want to do some experimenting, such as double exposure - im looking for tips as to when I should shot (time of day), which film is best for this task (100 or 400 film) what objects to shot for the first exposure (groud or actual image) - id appricate the help, as I said earlier, im new to film shooting. THANK YOU!




  
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kf095
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Mar 22, 2013 13:40 |  #2

I would check for camera which has separate shutter and rewind mechanism.
Much more easy for multiple exposure.
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If you taking handheld pictures in low light - 400. If on bright day - 100.

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DocFrankenstein
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Mar 23, 2013 02:56 |  #3

I really like the bokeh on that shot.


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SkipD
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Mar 23, 2013 06:12 |  #4

JessicaLynn22 wrote in post #15743507 (external link)
I am currently shooting photographs with a canon 35mm SLR camera, this is the first time doing film (since digital has taken over) - anyways, I am posting because I want to do some experimenting, such as double exposure - im looking for tips as to when I should shot (time of day), which film is best for this task (100 or 400 film) what objects to shot for the first exposure (groud or actual image) - id appricate the help, as I said earlier, im new to film shooting. THANK YOU!

Double exposures on film require the ability to either

1) Re-cock the shutter without moving the film frame in the camera.
- - - - - - or - - - - - -
2) Advance the film, cocking the shutter, and then rewind the film precisely one frame.

I don't know of ANY 35mm SLR cameras made since the early 1960s that have the ability to do either of these steps.

Some twin-lens reflex cameras including the Mamiya C-33 that I have allow the shutter to be cocked manually without advancing the film.


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jra
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Mar 23, 2013 08:38 |  #5

SkipD wrote in post #15746001 (external link)
Double exposures on film require the ability to either

1) Re-cock the shutter without moving the film frame in the camera.
- - - - - - or - - - - - -
2) Advance the film, cocking the shutter, and then rewind the film precisely one frame.

I don't know of ANY 35mm SLR cameras made since the early 1960s that have the ability to do either of these steps.

I had a Canon Rebel in the 90's that had the option to shoot without advancing the film to easily allow for multiple exposures on the same frame.




  
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SkipD
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Mar 23, 2013 09:07 |  #6

jra wrote in post #15746233 (external link)
I had a Canon Rebel in the 90's that had the option to shoot without advancing the film to easily allow for multiple exposures on the same frame.

That's good to hear. I've simply never seen a 35mm camera that could do that.

How did the feature work? Was there a control that allowed the film advance lever to be moved but disconnecting the film advance internally or was there a separate shutter cocking device?


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Tony-S
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Mar 23, 2013 10:22 |  #7

SkipD wrote in post #15746299 (external link)
That's good to hear. I've simply never seen a 35mm camera that could do that.

How did the feature work? Was there a control that allowed the film advance lever to be moved but disconnecting the film advance internally or was there a separate shutter cocking device?

The problem that I suspect jra is referring to is that most of the EOS camera had built-in motor drives/winders that precluded multiple exposures, unless the camera had a function to do so (like my EOS 3).


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Tony-S
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Mar 23, 2013 10:25 |  #8

JessicaLynn22 wrote in post #15743507 (external link)
I am currently shooting photographs with a canon 35mm SLR camera, this is the first time doing film (since digital has taken over) - anyways, I am posting because I want to do some experimenting, such as double exposure - im looking for tips as to when I should shot (time of day), which film is best for this task (100 or 400 film) what objects to shot for the first exposure (groud or actual image) - id appricate the help, as I said earlier, im new to film shooting. THANK YOU!

1. What camera do you have?
2. Film is film. Choose whatever works for the situation. I'm a big fan of Fuji Acros (100), Delta 100 and Neopan 400. For low-contrast scenes (e.g., cloudy day), Pan F+ and a tripod are a great combination.
3. The developer is just as important as the film you choose. My favs are Perceptol, XTOL and Pyrocat HD.


"Raw" is not an acronym, abbreviation, nor a proper noun; thus, it should not be in capital letters.

  
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J ­ Michael
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Mar 23, 2013 10:34 |  #9

Consider which elements are included and how an element in one exposure might affect one in another. An easy one - full moon with telephoto lens over landscape shot with a wide angle.

In some cases you want to mask part of the image with one exposure. You can use a black card for this, but note that the card edge will be sharper when the aperture is smaller.




  
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rick_reno
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Mar 23, 2013 11:16 |  #10

Haven't used film since the late 80's, but multiple exposures was something I missed when I moved to Canon digital bodies. If it can be done with the Canon, I couldn't figure out how to do it. My Nikon D800 can do it, the number of shots is variable from 2 to 10.
Have fun with film, I'll admit I don't miss it.




  
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JessicaLynn22
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Mar 23, 2013 12:27 |  #11

**Tony S: im using a canon ae-1, so ill have to manually rewind to do second shots but my main thing now would be, what do I shoot first if doing two exposures? do i shoot a main object first or sky/ground?! I know sounds silly, right- but im new to film/experimenting double exposure with an SLR. Thank you for your time/help




  
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yogestee
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Mar 23, 2013 12:35 |  #12

SkipD wrote in post #15746001 (external link)
Double exposures on film require the ability to either

1) Re-cock the shutter without moving the film frame in the camera.
- - - - - - or - - - - - -
2) Advance the film, cocking the shutter, and then rewind the film precisely one frame.

I don't know of ANY 35mm SLR cameras made since the early 1960s that have the ability to do either of these steps.

Some twin-lens reflex cameras including the Mamiya C-33 that I have allow the shutter to be cocked manually without advancing the film.

My Nikon FE and FE 2 (which I still have) you can cock the shutter without advancing the film, via a little lever next to the film advance.

http://www.thecamerasi​te.net …ras/Pages/nikon​%20fe2.htm (external link)


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Tony-S
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Mar 23, 2013 13:35 |  #13

JessicaLynn22 wrote in post #15746903 (external link)
**Tony S: im using a canon ae-1, so ill have to manually rewind to do second shots...

No rewinding necessary. After you take your first shot, simply depress the rewind button on the bottom of the camera. This disengages the film advance mechanism until after you wind the lever once more. So, after pressing the button, cock the shutter with the winding lever - the same frame stays right where it is. If you want to do triple exposure, you have to press the rewind button after the second exposure. And so on.

but my main thing now would be, what do I shoot first if doing two exposures? do i shoot a main object first or sky/ground?! I know sounds silly, right- but im new to film/experimenting double exposure with an SLR. Thank you for your time/help

Lots of creative things to do. You might try an illuminate subject against a dark background so that it takes about 1/4 of the frame in the corner, then move closer to the subject and take it again, this time in the center and towards the opposite corner.

You should probably google "double exposure" and show images in the results. That ought to get your neurons firing. :)


"Raw" is not an acronym, abbreviation, nor a proper noun; thus, it should not be in capital letters.

  
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Ranie ­ Dib
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Mar 25, 2013 11:18 |  #14

Sometimes 400 speed is not enough for really dark places, but it is the only BW film speed that I use in 35mm (TriX). You can either push or pull the development depending on your needs. For double exposure, most TLRs have a seperate cocking and winding mechanism, and you can do multiple exposures in cheap rebel cameras.

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airfrogusmc
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Mar 25, 2013 13:20 as a reply to  @ Ranie Dib's post |  #15

You can with the Canon EF and the Canon F-1




  
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