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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Wildlife Talk 
Thread started 08 Oct 2012 (Monday) 01:55
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Why photograph wildlife?

 
samsen
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Feb 06, 2013 21:33 |  #76

Well it has Wild and it has Life!
What else do you need not to save your camera?


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Evan
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Feb 12, 2013 15:54 |  #77

And the troll thread lives on...


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gjl711
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Feb 12, 2013 15:59 |  #78

BirdBoy wrote in post #15603034 (external link)
And the troll thread lives on...

Trolls are wildlife, aren't they?

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Ilovetheleafs
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Feb 13, 2013 22:22 |  #79

I personally shoot it for my own enjoyment also for me there's something incredibly calming for me shooting wildlife photos.


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jhayesvw
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Feb 14, 2013 18:50 as a reply to  @ Ilovetheleafs's post |  #80

Gomar wrote in post #15581283 (external link)
Like I said, I happened to walk underneath the tree by accident. Pay attention.

Here's my stuff, I've got bird shots.

http://www.flickr.com/​photos/rglukhoy/ (external link)

Some of your bird shots are impressive, most are too far away and need to be cropped.

Im glad you like photography.
Im not sure if you would like to compare my bird shots with yours so I will reserve comments.
As for my photos I choose the framing I want and have chosen to include some background, set the subject to one side or put space above/below intentionally.
I can tell you that every time a good wildlife photographer goes out it is another opportunity to spend time in nature and capture images/moments in time most people will never see



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mn ­ shutterbug
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Mar 07, 2013 21:12 |  #81

I love wildlife which is why I photograph wildlife. My love of wildlife is the reason I purchased my first SLR. It's always a challenge. Although I have many satisfying photos of bald eagles, I still see others photos that I wish were mine. There is always something unique to strive for. I used to hunt with a Mossberg and now I hunt with a Canon. The season is always open, no license is required and there are no limits. People are much too boring and irritating. I went that route one time and it was short lived. The stress would have shortened my life.

I love being able to share the evidence of the beautiful world God has given us.




  
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CyberDyneSystems
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Mar 07, 2013 22:02 |  #82

It was wildlife images and wildlife television on PBS that got me interested, that made me who I am today. Not as a photographer, but as a person who is dedicated to the world around him, and the beasties that live in it.

I loved looking at the unique moments posted in this thread to make the point that it's not about pixel peeping, no it's about the moment that 99.99% of the people in the world will never see (and far to much a % will never care to see)

Photography can raise awareness, a picture is worth a thousand words. It's the most powerful tool for conservation we have. We tiny little people with so little control of our own world can make this little difference.

As of rpixel peeing, some of my faovrite shots manage to show something I never thought I'd see, but were taken from so far off that the photos from a technical stand pint, .. well, er Suck!

Example,
Ever seen a Gannet dive and turn into an MX missile?

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CyberDyneSystems
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Mar 07, 2013 22:09 |  #83

What about those rare voyeuristic moments when we get to see something that honestly is eaves dropping on the critters private lives, .. moments that give us a sense of emotional familiarity ;

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jhayesvw
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Mar 08, 2013 19:59 as a reply to  @ CyberDyneSystems's post |  #84

Well said Jake.
And very nice photos!



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ChrisSearle
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Apr 01, 2013 12:13 as a reply to  @ jhayesvw's post |  #85

I have just been reminded that I started this thread and have neglected to come back and comment on some of the many responses, not an easy task but here goes:
Being a naturalist and lover of the outdoors it was the desire to record what I was seeing that got me into photography many eons ago. As my interest and knowledge grew I began to see how photography could be a useful tool in the study of nature, it is useful for recording the presence of plants and animals, as an aid in identification and as a tool for recording the lifecycles and interactions of plants and animals with their environment.
But hang on, this is a bit sterile, for the thing that gets us all interested at the start is surely, the beauty and the fascination that these subjects exert on us and there is of course a natural desire to capture this and reproduce it for our own and for others aesthetic enjoyment and this can of course be taken to a high art by talented people. All these are great reasons for taking photographs of wildlife - however....
I have witnessed on too many occasions the 'hunters' who need to 'bag' a quarry, and it is birders who are the worst for this. I actually call them 'train spotters' ( no offence to people who enjoy spotting trains) as they often ( I know quite a few so I do speak from experience) know little about their 'target'. Similarly, I've photographed tigers in the wild, a great and almost emotional experience the first time, if somewhat tempered by being in a group of about twenty other people all clicking away, fingers permanently pressed on the shutter release until their buffers are full. I looked up when in this crowd and took some time to watch the big cat through binoculars and this was for me, a far more intimate and learning experience that taking some shots with a long white lens, but thats just me.
I just wish that more wildlife pictures were considered and communicated more than the structure of the plant or animal rather than boring ( to me) accurate documentary illustrations.
And I do not what to come over 'holier than thou' as I've been there, I've exulted in the 'capture' of a new bird or butterfly and felt immense satisfaction in such a capture being as close to perfect technically as my skill and equipment allow me to be, however, I have become bored with this pastime, much more akin to hunting with light than 'drawing with light'. I still use a camera to record interesting stuff and if the opportunity presents itself I will certainly click away, however for me, far more satisfaction is to be gained by trying to present a unique viewpoint or interpretation of, well, anything tbh.
One final word to those who say in response 'why then photograph people' or architecture or anything for that matter: All I can say is that I am sure Wood sandpipers all look very different - if you are a Wood sandpiper but to me, they all look pretty much the same ( yes I know there are juv/adult differences and sexual dimorphism) whereas people look to me to be completely unique as do landscapes, buildings and well, pretty much everything man made (And the majority of our landscapes are man made these days unless you are in deep wilderness or out at sea). So while I can see an infinite variety of possibilities in these things, a nice sharp photograph of a bird with good background blur to make it 'pop' is exactly the same as a zillion others.
Happy 'shooting'!


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Tom ­ Reichner
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Apr 01, 2013 14:35 |  #86

Chris,
It's great to see you revisit this thread! It is certainly a great thread you created, as it has elicited many enthusiastic, opinionated responses from quite a few people.

ChrisSearle wrote in post #15778927 (external link)
I have witnessed on too many occasions the 'hunters' who need to 'bag' a quarry, and it is birders who are the worst for this . . . as they often know little about their 'target'.

I just wish that more wildlife pictures were considered, and communicated more than the structure of the plant or animal rather than boring accurate documentary illustrations. I have become bored with this pastime, much more akin to hunting with light than 'drawing with light' . . . for me, far more satisfaction is to be gained by trying to present a unique viewpoint or interpretation of, well, anything tbh.

What you've said here is all stuff that I agree with wholeheartedly. Yet our conclusions on the topic are polar opposites.

You see many, many wildlife photographers creating portrait-type images of the same species, that all look basically the same, and find it to be boring. As a result, you have taken your photographic pursuits away from wildlife, and decided to photograph other subject matter instead.

I see many, many wildlife photographers creating portrait-type images of the same species, that all look basically the same, and also find it to be boring. But instead of "giving up" on wildlife photography, I have taken the opposite approach. I want to photograph the same animals and birds, yet I want to create images that, as you say, "present a unique viewpoint or interpretation".

I think that one of the marks of a great photographer is the ability to photograph the same subject, in the same place, and yet create a vast amount of images that all have a completely different look and feel to them. This is, perhaps, the greatest challenge in photographing wildlife.

I believe the ability to create beautiful, unique wildlife images is still out there - and will always be out there.

There are millions and millions of images "out there", just waiting for a wildlife photographer to take. Or, more accurately, "create". There are so many deer photos out there that nobody has ever taken. Even the most frequently photographed animals and birds can be photographed in a way that has never been done before. I bet there are a million photos of a seagull "out there" that have never been taken, each with a completely different look than any other seagull photo that has ever been taken.

So, for me, the pursuit of wildlife photography is far from "been there, done that". I am not looking at what has already been done . . . rather, I am directing my focus toward that which has not yet been done, and spending my life trying to capture it. That is why I photograph wildlife.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
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JohanBorjesson
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Apr 02, 2013 13:52 |  #87

I haven't done any wildlife photography yet but to answer the OP anyway. Wildlife is so relaxing and rewarding, it's so great being out in the nature.


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jhayesvw
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Apr 02, 2013 22:01 as a reply to  @ JohanBorjesson's post |  #88

As Tom said, Not all shots have been created.

Here is one I took a month or so ago.
It is the first and only photo of a Male Cardinal perched with a female Phainopepla I have ever seen. Its not a technically perfect photo, but I had but a few seconds to capture it and do not like to do much post processing to remove things.
I guess there could be one out there, but I haven't seen it.

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mn ­ shutterbug
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Apr 02, 2013 22:14 |  #89

That is probably a one of a kind, something definitely to strive for. Congrats on the shot.

I've had a lot of compliments on this shot, for the same reason. You just don't normally see a Blue Jay and Red-belly Woodpecker together. Good reason to continue shooting wildlife. You will never run out of new opportunities.

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ChrisSearle
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Apr 03, 2013 05:05 as a reply to  @ mn shutterbug's post |  #90

I guess what I am railing against is the senseless acquisition of multiple images of the organism, done purely for self gratification without thought for the organism it'self.
I can feel and understand the attraction of doing so but too often it is done with a 'stamp collecting' mentality.
I have certainly not given up photographing wildlife and still do both for record and for aesthetic reasons, but I find I can do this equally well with house sparrows as some scarce, 'collectable' species.
Probably my bigest reason for moving my focus onto other areas is that I have neither the skill nor the patience to do it well!


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Why photograph wildlife?
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