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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 09 Apr 2013 (Tuesday) 14:52
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Sigma 24-70 no Image Stabilization for Canon 6D?

 
mlech
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Apr 09, 2013 14:52 |  #1

I've been using a T3I / Sigma 17-70 f2.8-4 combo for a while,
I'm now switching over to Canon 6D and will need a new lens

On my crop body T3I, 17mm is wide enough for me.
Would 24mm on a crop body be the same or a bit wider?

I didn't end up using the 70mm zoom range that often, but I'd still want something with quite a bit of zoom.


I want the Sigma 24-70mm F2.8 but it doesn't have IS.

In my experience IS has been helpful compared to non-IS lenses.
I have done a lot of handheld shots at in dark lighting situations (usually at night outdoors) at 1/15 - 1/30 shutter and I can nail steady pictures no problem, I'm sure the IS on my 17-70 helped with that.

So can I get away with this lens that doesn't have IS on the 6D? would videos be more shaky, and anything below 1/60 shutter handheld there is a chance it will blur? It obviously won't be often to shoot below 1/60 that's what higher ISO is for but I like the flexibility.

It will be my main photo/video lens.

So just trying to figure out if Image Stabilization is really that important.

Thanks


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gonzogolf
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Apr 09, 2013 15:05 |  #2

You can get away with slower shutter speeds on a full frame body than with the rebel so thats a plus. The rule of thumb is 1/shutter speed so on the wide end you can probably come close to 1/15 handheld without IS, your mileage may vary though. 17 on a crop is equal to 27.2 on full frame so the 24 is wider.




  
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amfoto1
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Apr 09, 2013 15:24 |  #3

Canon 24-70/2.8 doesn't have IS, either.

Only Tamron is offering a 24-70/2.8 with IS (they call it VC, instead).

Canon has announced a 24-70/4 IS.

IS adds a lot of cost, as well as some size, a little weight and more complexity. It's harder to maintain high image quality with the additional, moving optics of any sort of stabilization mechanism, and I think most would agree that a 24-70/2.8 from any manufacturer should strive to be one of their most premium lenses.

I use Canon 24-70/2.8 and never miss not having IS with it. I just don't need it on these focal lengths and wouldn't want to pay extra for it.

I'm a huge fan of IS on telephoto lenses... have been using 70-200, 300mm and 500mm with it for 10 or 12 years now. I also have some shorter lenses with it, but it wasn't really very much of a consideration for me, with focal lengths shorter than, say, 135mm. I wouldn't want to pay much extra for it, but will take it if it's included or there simply isn't any choice and I really need the focal lengths and other features the lens offers.

Recently Canon has started offering, for example, 24/2.8 USM IS, 28/2.8 USM IS and has announced 35/2 USM IS is coming. I'd love to have a 24/2.8 USM or 35/2 USM, but not at the $800+ US price tags they have on these, a lot of which is due to the addition of IS.

I really don't know about video... if IS helps or is a problem. If using an IS Lens and panning with moving subjects, you see IS "working" at times... moving the image in the viewfinder. Would that be a problem with video? I don't know, I simply don't shoot video with my DSLRs.

There are other techniques to manage steady-enough shots with slower shutter speeds, without any sort of stabilization. Rest your elbows on a table.Or lean against a wall. Or just take extra shots, a short burst, one of them is likely to come out plenty sharp.

24-70/2.8L at 63mm on 5D Mark II, at 1/30 handheld (outdoor shade with polarizing filter and ISO 3200, no support, just took a series of shots, some of which were fine)...

IMAGE: http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6091/6364490937_c328b3713e_z.jpg

50mm lens on crop camera at 1/30 handheld (my elbows resting on a table)...

IMAGE: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8083/8300648819_476a9f55d2_z.jpg

85mm lens on crop camera at 1/80, handheld (leaning against a wall, the only light source in a darkened room was from the projector, it's noisy because I was pushing ISO pretty high on a 30D to get this shot)

IMAGE: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8363/8315577224_c5e6b304bc_z.jpg

100mm lens on crop camera at 1/60 handheld (window daylight only, handheld and not using any support, just took plenty of shots)...

IMAGE: http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6233/6271547534_d1b238188a_z.jpg

180mm lens on full frame (film) camera... unknown shutter speed, but since I use ISO 50 and 100 film, it wasn't very fast... Avail. daylight outdoors, handheld. Well, okay, camera and lens are actually resting on the ground.

IMAGE: http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5093/5585285923_f2d1d237aa_z.jpg

Of course, you can use a monopod or a tripod. Another trick is a 5 or 6 foot long piece of 1/4 or 5/16" cord/rope with a 1/4x20 bolt tied to one end, screwed into the bottom of your camera. Let the rope drop and step on it to make it taut. It's surprising how much this helps. Plus you can roll up the rope and stick the whole thing in a coat pocket!

Keep in mind, IS or OS or VC can only help keep your camera and lens steady (and you still need to use good techniques to get the best out of it). Stabilization of any sort can't help stop subject movement. When you get into these low shutter speeds, your subject has to remain pretty still. Even a light breeze on a flower or leaf can cause problems.

Yes, it's easier to handhold lenses on full frame such as 6D, than on a crop camera... However when you get to 1/30, 1/15 shutter speeds you start to get in the range where mirror slap can cause enough shake to start showing up in images, and that's worse with the larger mirror and shutter of a full frame camera than it is with the smaller ones in a crop camera. You start to get into speeds where you might want to consider using mirror lockup with most cameras starting around 1/30 or slower, down to around 1 or 2 seconds, beyond which any mirror slap is only a small percentage of the overall exposure and fairly insignificant.

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L.J.G.
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Apr 09, 2013 18:01 |  #4

I use a Sigma 24-70 and don't miss IS on it. What Alan says above is quite right about mirror slap. With the 6D though you have a very capable camera for noise control. If the light is poor and you need to drop shutter speed just put the ISO up till you get an acceptable shutter speed.


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GregoryF
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Apr 09, 2013 18:42 |  #5

24-70mm will be as wide as a 15mm on your crop, but 70mm will look more like 45mm on the long end. Have you considered the 24-105L? This will give you more range and the benifit of IS.


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Sirrith
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Apr 09, 2013 20:24 |  #6

The 24-105 will give you similar range to your 17-70, as well as IS. It will be a bit slower on the wide end, but I doubt you'll notice that.


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mlech
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Apr 09, 2013 20:46 as a reply to  @ Sirrith's post |  #7

Yep I did consider the 24-105, but the ONLY thing is the F4. Which I'm still debating about..


I really like lenses with an aperture of F2.8 or even more, even my current Sigma at wide angle F2.8 I can get a nice bokeh when shooting larger object closer up. Also it's better for low light pictures/video shooting..

I noticed a pretty big difference compared to my old Canon 17-85 f/4-5.6


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mlech
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Apr 09, 2013 20:46 |  #8

and thanks amfoto1 for the info!!
I'll really have to consider everything


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Apr 09, 2013 21:43 |  #9

mlech wrote in post #15809937 (external link)
and thanks amfoto1 for the info!!
I'll really have to consider everything

Have you looked into the new Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8 which has image stabilization? Granted it's more money then the Sigma, but some reviews have compared it favorably with the very expensive Canon version. While more expensive than the Sigma, it's close to half the price of the Canon. On B&H the Sigma goes for $824, the Tamron $1299, and the Canon is $2299. I have also read a in a couple of places that the Tamron is sharper than the Sigma with less barrel distortion, but i have no personal experience with either lens.


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Sigma 24-70 no Image Stabilization for Canon 6D?
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