Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 14 Apr 2013 (Sunday) 16:53
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Focus options for sports

 
wdh777
Member
77 posts
Joined Apr 2013
     
Apr 14, 2013 16:53 |  #1

Just learning. For soccer or sports what is your normal focus mode? Al aero but do you use all 61 points or the cross or box and crop later? Trying to get tack sharp pictures with a 70-200 or 400 and right now my yield is about 10% tack sharp or 80% very good. I'm learning there is a huge difference between those that are perfect vs excellent. It takes a skill to focus perfectly on a moving object at 2.8 but when you get the pic it's amazing.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
Mike ­ R
Goldmember
4,319 posts
Likes: 3
Joined May 2006
Location: 06478, CT
     
Apr 14, 2013 18:19 |  #2

I use single point, AI servo for sports. On the 5d mklll I'll switch the focus option based on the sport.


Mike R
www.mikerubinphoto.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
wdh777
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
77 posts
Joined Apr 2013
     
Apr 14, 2013 18:50 as a reply to  @ Mike R's post |  #3

Is 2.8 too shallow to shoot sports? Would it be easier to focus at a higher aperture?




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Mike ­ R
Goldmember
4,319 posts
Likes: 3
Joined May 2006
Location: 06478, CT
     
Apr 14, 2013 20:41 |  #4

wdh777 wrote in post #15827885 (external link)
Is 2.8 too shallow to shoot sports? Would it be easier to focus at a higher aperture?

It's not too shallow. I shoot most sports at 2.8


Mike R
www.mikerubinphoto.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
JeffreyG
"my bits and pieces are all hard"
Avatar
15,520 posts
Gallery: 42 photos
Likes: 592
Joined Jan 2007
Location: Detroit, MI
     
Apr 14, 2013 20:57 |  #5

wdh777 wrote in post #15827885 (external link)
Is 2.8 too shallow to shoot sports? Would it be easier to focus at a higher aperture?

No. Typically a thin DOF is preferred for sports to control the otherwise lousy backgrounds.

I use manually selected AF points. Depending on the sport I then will use anything from none to all points available for expansion in tracking. It depends a lot on how much clutter and crossing action there is in the sport in question.


My personal stuff:http://www.flickr.com/​photos/jngirbach/sets/ (external link)
I use a Canon 5DIII and a Sony A7rIII

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
CyberDyneSystems
Admin (type T-2000)
Avatar
49,820 posts
Gallery: 161 photos
Likes: 6519
Joined Apr 2003
Location: Rhode Island USA
     
Apr 14, 2013 21:01 |  #6

For fast moving things, don;t be afraid to try the expanding focus areas on the MkIII.
It does an amazing job of helping you keep the subject in focus when you can't keep a single AF point on the subject.
With expansion, you still have control of the AF point, but you allow Canons AF tracking to function.

You've got the best AF system in a camera, might as well take advantage of some of it's functionality.


GEAR LIST
CDS' HOT LINKS
Jake Hegnauer Photography (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ChunkyDA
Goldmember
Avatar
3,706 posts
Gallery: 16 photos
Likes: 88
Joined Apr 2007
Location: Emerald Coast, FL
     
Apr 14, 2013 21:39 |  #7

What camera do you have? Your situation is called a "low keeper rate". This will improve with practice, correct camera settings including some special ones deep in the menu, and almost certainly use of the back focus button


Dave
Support Search and Rescue, Get Lost (external link)
Gear list and some feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
wdh777
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
77 posts
Joined Apr 2013
     
Apr 15, 2013 05:48 as a reply to  @ ChunkyDA's post |  #8

Shooting with a 5d mark iii




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
bobbyz
Cream of the Crop
19,434 posts
Likes: 1614
Joined Nov 2007
Location: Bay Area, CA
     
Apr 15, 2013 08:42 |  #9

5dmk3 with 70-200mm and 400mm (I assume f2.8 one) and 10% tack sharp. Time to practice the skills unless this happening with 5dmk3 setup now. :)

Make sure camera is set properly. AI servo with or without assist points. On 5dmk3 I don;t hesitate to use outer AF points (cross ones).

AI servo first and subsequent image priority set to focus. I want sharp shots even at lower fps.


5dmk3, 35L, 85L II, 300mm f2.8 IS I, 400mm f5.6
Fuji XT-1, 14mm f2.8, 23mm f1.4, 35mm f1.4, 56mm f1.2, 90mm f2, 50-140mm f2.8

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
amfoto1
Cream of the Crop
10,251 posts
Likes: 84
Joined Aug 2007
Location: San Jose, California
     
Apr 15, 2013 11:27 |  #10

wdh777 wrote in post #15827885 (external link)
Is 2.8 too shallow to shoot sports? Would it be easier to focus at a higher aperture?


It depends on the distance to the subject.... if they are fairly distant, f2.8 is fine. If close, you might find depth of field too shallow. Both these examples are shot with 300mm at fairly close distances...

This image was done with 300/2.8 IS at f5.6, the point of focus is on the horse's face and the rider's face is slightly soft (still a very usable photo, IMO)...

IMAGE: http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5256/5537197377_eef5acac58_b.jpg

Even closer at f2.8, the point of focus is on the horse's neck, so the rider's gloved hands are slightly soft (which is fine by me). Just barely kept the horse's face in good enough focus to be acceptable.

IMAGE: http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6068/6144395151_d04cde9dd3_b.jpg

Both the above were done using a tripod and gimbal mount.

A bit more distant subject, handheld with 300/4 IS at f4 (image was cropped slightly)...

IMAGE: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8182/8004825444_7243cc2478_b.jpg

More distant subjects, large apertures give plenty of depth of field...

300/2.8 IS at f2.8 (on tripod/gimbal)...

IMAGE: http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6170/6144396527_a7832b1ff4_o.jpg

300/4 IS at f5.6, handheld....

IMAGE: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8320/8004821099_88c3d54e3e_b.jpg

If you stop down a little... say to f4 or f5.6, you'll very likely have more keepers. A little extra depth of field can cover slight focus error.

Of course, it's fun to use f2.8 and shallow DOF to blur down parts of the image and keep select parts sharp... but it takes some luck and/or add'l skill when shooting moving subjects.

I use single point, manually selected, AI Servo and Back Button Focusing most of the time. Any time you leave it up to the camera to select the point of focus (Expansion, Zone, or - God forbid - All Points), there's a chance it will choose to focus somewhere other than where you would like it.

It does take practice to be able to track and keep focus on moving subjects consistently. If working with a 400/2.8, a tripod with a gimbal head can be a big help, if you don't already have one.

EDIT: I forgot to note, you are probably aware that any lens wide open has a perfectly round aperture... stopping down at all can introduce the shape of the aperture into the image, particularly in OOF background highlights. This effect varies with lenses, better ones have more blades to form a more perfect aperture and many of Canon's more advanced L-series have curved aperture blades as well. Still, you might see an 8-sided shape rather than a perfectly round OOF highlight. So you might handle backgrounds with highlights differently than ones without any highlights.

Alan Myers (external link) "Walk softly and carry a big lens."
5DII, 7DII(x2), 7D(x2) & other cameras. 10-22mm, Tokina 12-24/4, 20/2.8, TS 24/3.5L, 24-70/2.8L, 28/1.8, 28-135 IS (x2), TS 45/2.8, 50/1.4, Tamron 60/2.0, 70-200/4L IS, 70-200/2.8 IS, 85/1.8, Tamron 90/2.5 Macro, 100/2.8 USM, 100-400L II, 135/2L, 180/3.5L, 300/4L IS (x2), 300/2.8L IS, 500/4L IS, EF 1.4X II, EF 2X II. Flashes, studio strobes & various access. - FLICKR (external link) - ZENFOLIO (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
wdh777
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
77 posts
Joined Apr 2013
     
Apr 15, 2013 14:01 as a reply to  @ amfoto1's post |  #11

I'm using the single box but the box will move through all 61 points to keep tracking the target. I think this is the last option as you toggle through the points. I'm shooting soccer so lot's of kids close together moving before and behind the target and lot's of change in movement. I'm using the focus mode for soccer. Don't get me wrong I would say 90% of the images are in focus and look good. But if I blow the faces up maybe 90% become a little soft vs 10% the faces even at an extreme close up are completely sharp. I'm assuming that 10% are what refer to as tack sharp? Any normal person would think the others look fantastic but I can tell a slight difference. I must say the bokeh using the 400 2.8 is absolutely amazing.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
bobbyz
Cream of the Crop
19,434 posts
Likes: 1614
Joined Nov 2007
Location: Bay Area, CA
     
Apr 15, 2013 14:19 |  #12

Can you post some examples of the tack sharp and not so sharp.:)


5dmk3, 35L, 85L II, 300mm f2.8 IS I, 400mm f5.6
Fuji XT-1, 14mm f2.8, 23mm f1.4, 35mm f1.4, 56mm f1.2, 90mm f2, 50-140mm f2.8

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
wdh777
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
77 posts
Joined Apr 2013
     
Apr 15, 2013 15:00 as a reply to  @ bobbyz's post |  #13

I'll try to later. It is similar to the horse picture above with the gloves being soft although more in focus than that. It is more like that same photo where the neck I would say is tack sharp but the face of the horse is slightly soft. I think it is when the lens focuses on say the shirt of the player vs the face so the face is just slightly soft vs when you actually get the focus point on the players eyes. Although I find that to focus on the eyes of a player who is moving quickly with obstacles from 50 yards away isn't the easiest thing to do. I'm probably lucky to at least get the shirt. I do get the small yield where I get the face in which case it is crystal clear.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

1,471 views & 0 likes for this thread
Focus options for sports
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is StevePB
688 guests, 192 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.