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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos HDR Creation 
Thread started 17 Apr 2013 (Wednesday) 11:14
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HDR Panoramic

 
merkaba
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Apr 17, 2013 11:14 |  #1

I took my first two HDR shots today. One of my uncles barn and one of my parents house...just for practice. CC encouraged.

IMAGE: https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-ZUyuqjU5U3I/UW7hfELTzvI/AAAAAAAAVNs/vRAZzNeF6UQ/s720/barn2.jpg

IMAGE: https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-vdBNoKHVxOY/UW7hxFw_2cI/AAAAAAAAVN4/rQrv1lBeRt0/s912/house.jpg

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saketb
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Apr 17, 2013 13:36 |  #2

I am not well versed with HDR photography, but one with the 'barn' looks terrific.

The dark blue color on the sky has given a very nice contrast throughout the image which makes me look at it all the time.


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merkaba
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Apr 17, 2013 14:05 |  #3

That's good news. I'm not well versed at all. It's something I decided to try after looking through this section. I love this forum :) Thanks saketb.


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thomatis
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Apr 18, 2013 02:42 |  #4

Way over-saturated,- halos etc. I am assuming you used photomatix.
Sorry, not my cup of tea.




  
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merkaba
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Apr 18, 2013 07:42 |  #5

thomatis wrote in post #15840533 (external link)
Way over-saturated,- halos etc. I am assuming you used photomatix.
Sorry, not my cup of tea.

Yes i did use photomatix. I honestly am having a really hard time finding an advantage to shooting HDR. It seems like i can get the same results by simply shooting RAW like i usually do and making normal edits in Lightroom. What are your thoughts on this one?

IMAGE: https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-TsF3Yw5bCqI/UW_qG9nYmsI/AAAAAAAAVOQ/edLY8svkLiA/s720/barn3.jpg

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EL_PIC
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Apr 18, 2013 08:05 |  #6
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merkaba wrote in post #15840982 (external link)
Yes i did use photomatix. I honestly am having a really hard time finding an advantage to shooting HDR. It seems like i can get the same results by simply shooting RAW like i usually do and making normal edits in Lightroom. What are your thoughts on this one?

HDR offers slight to moderate advantage but only at specific light subjective levels.
It increases dynamic range of your photos and that is valued when the range of light is beyond 5 - 7 stops range {normal Canon Nikon camera raw range}.
Imagine a full sunlight scene with 15 + stop range ...
You can also do HDR with single raw exposure to enhance normal raw range.
Most scenes do not need such a 15+ range.
HDR can compensate for poor lighting {excessive range between light and dark}.
Your scenes above do not need extended range and HDR use is misused here.
You might remove the power lines in #2.


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merkaba
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Apr 18, 2013 08:21 |  #7

Thanks EL_PIC, that's helpful.


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thomatis
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Apr 18, 2013 08:57 |  #8

merkaba wrote in post #15840982 (external link)
Yes i did use photomatix. I honestly am having a really hard time finding an advantage to shooting HDR. It seems like i can get the same results by simply shooting RAW like i usually do and making normal edits in Lightroom. What are your thoughts on this one?

In the two images you posted, there is no advantage as there is no, or very little 'high dynamic range' in the shots. There might be minimal dynamic range but at the distance these were taken it's hardly detectable.
High dynamic range imaging is so often confused with 'tone mapping'. People talk about the 'hdr look' when they mean the 'tone mapped look'. Both these images would have worked just fine with single raw files. The third image you posted still has the halo effect and weird sky color. Shoot some bracketed images on a scene with a high dynamic range. (i.e. - shadowed areas and nearly blown sky around your subject).
Have fun.




  
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kirkt
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Apr 18, 2013 09:56 |  #9

The thing about HDR is that it can be used anytime, anywhere but is not necessarily appropriate anytime, anywhere. You can shoot 5 images 1EV apart, in complete darkness, and merge them and tonemap them without any part of the workflow complaining but it isn't going to do anything for you.

Try this experiment, which, if I were king of the HDR world, would be a mandatory exercise for all HDR enthusiasts. Choose a nice sunny day like the one you have pictured above - shoot from inside, and include a window to the outside in your composition. This will necessitate HDR techniques because your scene will include the deep shadows of your interior scene and the bright highlights of the sunlit exterior scene all in the frame of your image. The dynamic range of the SCENE is what determines the need for HDR imaging. If your indoor scene is flooded with sunlight, you may not need HDR - so choose a northern exposure window with a brightly lit scene outside, but no direct sunlight flooding the interior. This will ensure that your DR in the frame of your shot is "high."

In this experiment, the DR of the scene may well be 16-18 stops or so. How does one determine this? Well, aside from the fact that some HDR applications will give you a report of the DR of your HDR data, you can (and should) meter the scene to give you an idea of the necessary exposure range your HDR exposure sequence should cover. If you have a light meter that does spot metering, then it is pretty straightforward - point it at the darkest shadow areas and take a reading, point it at the brightest highlight areas containing detail and take a reading. There you go. NOTE that your camera has a spot meter built right in! So, put your camera in spot meter mode and take measurements of the scene. If the brightest highlights exceed the highest shutter speed for your settings, decrease your aperture or ISO and try again. THe shadow exposures may require shutter speeds beyond your ability to handhold the camera, so a tripod is a must.

Now you have an idea of the range of exposures you have to cover to completely capture the DR of the scene. Your shutter speeds may be something like:

shadows: 1s
highlights: 1/2000s

for a reasonable camera configuration of ISO 200 and f/4 or similar. That's a difference of 11EV between the "proper" exposures for the extrema of your scene, and beyond the capability of your camera's sensor. If you shoot at 1EV intervals, you will end up with 11 images to merge. There is nothing wrong with shooting this many images, you can always try merging fewer images (i.e., taking every other image so that you merge at 2EV intervals) but you can't make up the data in between images in a sequence where too few images were shot.

In the images you posted above, you could have likely produced a very nice image with a single raw exposure. Even though the scene is lit by bright sunlight (which folks may equate to "high" dynamic range) the scene also contains a lot of fill light from the sky with very little of the scene's being hidden from these light sources - that is, the shadows are also brightly lit and the range between shadows and highlights is manageable in terms of a single exposure - hence, the scene's dynamic range can likely be captured fully in a single exposure. If the sun were present IN the scene, then the scene's dynamic range would have been much much higher. In contrast, the indoor/outdoor experiment mentioned above contains a much greater range between the darkest shadows and brightest highlights, and, hence, a much greater dynamic range, and likely one that will exceed that of your sensor's ability to capture in a single exposure.

kirk


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merkaba
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Apr 18, 2013 13:05 |  #10

kirkt, i can't thank you enough for the awesome explanation. I appreciate it very much. I will definitely try this :)


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kirkt
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Apr 18, 2013 20:29 |  #11

You're welcome. Post the results of your experiment here!

kirk


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merkaba
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Apr 19, 2013 07:45 |  #12

Hopefully this weekend when the sun comes back out :)


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bpiper7
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Apr 20, 2013 13:09 |  #13

kirkt wrote in post #15841387 (external link)
Now you have an idea of the range of exposures you have to cover to completely capture the DR of the scene. Your shutter speeds may be something like:

shadows: 1s
highlights: 1/2000s

kirk

And now people have a concise understandable idea of what HDR is supposed to be. You're a treasure, Kirk,


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kirkt
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Apr 20, 2013 21:41 |  #14

:) Ha! Thanks Bill.

kirk


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