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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Astronomy & Celestial 
Thread started 25 Sep 2012 (Tuesday) 20:18
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Official post your Star Trail pictures

 
NCHANT
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May 03, 2013 22:47 |  #91

fortisi876 wrote in post #15895620 (external link)
Am I missing something here, no tracking device was used or is needed? ???

Nope, no tracking device :) so long as the shot is RAW you can nearly achieve anything. But editing in LR4 did not get this image, it was the brightness/contrast layer in PS that really brought the details out.


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ktan7
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May 04, 2013 09:23 |  #92

Cool photographs, guys! :)


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fortisi876
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May 05, 2013 13:15 |  #93

NCHANT wrote in post #15895863 (external link)
Nope, no tracking device :) so long as the shot is RAW you can nearly achieve anything. But editing in LR4 did not get this image, it was the brightness/contrast layer in PS that really brought the details out.

TY for the explanation!




  
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Gizmo1985
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May 05, 2013 14:24 |  #94

Question. How do you know which way to look to get certain curves of star trails.
For instance some people have Circles, Some have Horizontal Curves, and some have Verticle curves.
ALSO, how do you find the milky way to take a picture.
Sorry for the noob questions.


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Celestron
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May 05, 2013 15:24 |  #95

Gizmo1985 wrote in post #15900173 (external link)
Question. How do you know which way to look to get certain curves of star trails.
For instance some people have Circles, Some have Horizontal Curves, and some have Verticle curves.
ALSO, how do you find the milky way to take a picture.
Sorry for the noob questions.

Real quick way to learn is get a compass and find north . Point your camera toward north , mount camera on a tripod and elevate to roughly whatever your location latitude is . Camera settings 800 ISO or higher , if it's really dark use f/4.0-4.5 , use manual mode , set camera to 25-30 secs exposure and trip the shutter and don't touch the camera til the exposure is done . This will give you a star image with no or very little trailing of the stars . For star trail set camera for 1-2 min exposures . This will start giving you a slight amount of trailing . If you have it pointed directly north you can find Polaris by finding the center star that has no trailing . It's pretty much like a bullseye target . South is different . There will not be a star that you can find but there is a center point but unless you live south the equator you will not see that in the Northern hemisphere . But you can setup the camera exact same way as north , only point the tripod direct south . You know the sun comes up in the east and goes down in the west right ? Stars do the exact same thing , pattern , path and speed . Other words the only reason you are seeing the night sky move is because of earths rotation in space . Stars are so far out that you cannot see them move in your lifetime . Stars stand still , the earth rotates . Face south everything goes from left to right ( east to west) , face north everything moves right to left ( still east to west tho) . Milkyway is actually an arm of the MilkyWay Galaxie which we are part of and we see only one arm and that is the Milkyway , and the larger section is in the south for Northern hemisphere locations , but people in the far south below the equator see it higher in the sky than northern hemisphere people .




  
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Gizmo1985
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May 06, 2013 22:55 |  #96

WOW, that was alot of info. HAHA.

Im in KY if that helps.


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nburwell
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May 07, 2013 12:03 |  #97

Here is one from this past weekend. 37 images stacked at 30 seconds.

IMAGE: http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7452/8716207296_b6e16f4c3f_c.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com/​photos/nburwell22/8716​207296/  (external link)
The Twilight Zone (external link) by nburwell22 (external link), on Flickr



  
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SimonClarkson
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May 08, 2013 05:50 |  #98

Some great images here!!

Here's my very first attempt from last night! Pleasing if a little boring!

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
HTTP response: NOT FOUND | MIME changed to 'image/gif' | Redirected to error image by FLICKR

Star trails Ashdown Forest (external link) by Simon Clarkson Photography (external link), on Flickr



  
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Max ­ Powers
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May 08, 2013 15:20 |  #99

My only concern with one exposure is the noise.

I believe this is the reason people stack images in the first place. Stacking images is very easy. You get a timer, set the camera on bulb mode and set your timer to take 100 to 250 thirty second exposures (for example).

Once that's done just load all the images into a stacking program like StarTrails and let it do all the work for ya!

I've done it once so far and the process itself was easy. My problem was that I went out there with a buddy after we spent the night drinking, brought more beers with us and eventually forgot to focus on the truck in the foreground. lol.

Oh I got my star trails......


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LowriderS10
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May 08, 2013 21:51 |  #100

273 images stacked @ 30 sec each in South Korea:

IMAGE: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8116/8699827507_95b8063ec4_b.jpg

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May 09, 2013 14:54 |  #101

The Race Track out at Death Valley National Park
120 shots at 25 sec ea stacked in PS CS6..Tokina 16-28 and the 5D3

IMAGE: http://jasonsphotography.net/img/s8/v82/p1525686064-5.jpg
By the way...some of the shots in this thread inspired me to get out and start shooting trails...

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fortisi876
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May 09, 2013 15:07 |  #102

LowriderS10 wrote in post #15912998 (external link)
273 images stacked @ 30 sec each in South Korea:

QUOTED IMAGE

Is it just me or does the photo above appear to have opposing star trail arcs?\


Great photo BTW!




  
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Todd ­ Lambert
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May 09, 2013 15:24 |  #103

fortisi876 wrote in post #15915449 (external link)
Is it just me or does the photo above appear to have opposing star trail arcs?\


Great photo BTW!

Yes, depending on the position of the earth and your position on it, it's certainly possible to gets trails appearing in two directions towards the poles. Here's an older shot I did that shows this:

IMAGE: http://twilightscapes.com/forums/spikespin-001.jpg



  
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May 09, 2013 18:52 |  #104

fortisi876 wrote in post #15915449 (external link)
Is it just me or does the photo above appear to have opposing star trail arcs?\


Great photo BTW!

90 deg to the polar axis is the celestial equator, which instead of starts forming circles, they form straight lines....
Below should make it obvious.

IMAGE: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/61/AxialTiltObliquity.png

http://en.wikipedia.or​g/wiki/Celestial_equat​or (external link)

The celestial equator is a great circle on the imaginary celestial sphere, in the same plane as the Earth's equator. In other words, it is a projection of the terrestrial equator out into space.[1] As a result of the Earth's axial tilt, the celestial equator is inclined by 23.4° with respect to the ecliptic plane.

An observer standing on the Earth's equator visualizes the celestial equator as a semicircle passing directly overhead through the zenith. As the observer moves north (or south), the celestial equator tilts towards the southern (or northern) horizon. The celestial equator is defined to be infinitely distant (since it is on the celestial sphere); thus the observer always sees the ends of the semicircle disappear over the horizon exactly due east and due west, regardless of the observer's position on Earth. (At the poles, though, the celestial equator would be parallel to the horizon.) At all latitudes the celestial equator appears perfectly straight because the observer is only finitely far from the plane of the celestial equator but infinitely far from the celestial equator itself.[2]

So, located in the northern hemisphere, around 42deg, looking North you see this Feb-4-2011

IMAGE: https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-UE1j7PUlnFM/TU5v_JmNdvI/AAAAAAAANjU/sfZ2JQRzXZw/s1024/North%2520looking%2520StarTrails%25202-05-2011%25204am%252055%2520min%2520exposures.jpg

and looking south same night see this
IMAGE: https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-sApB1WRgOpY/TU5v-puneNI/AAAAAAAANjY/NtCVf0Io6sw/s1024/South%2520looking%2520StarTrails-%25202-4-2011%2520%252010%253A30pm%252045min%2520exposures.jpg

Orion's belt and nebula visible dead center top center of image
IMAGE: https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-GKooQoOwvb4/TU5v-KKLeLI/AAAAAAAAMDA/HXusUh6m6W4/s1024/StarTrails%25202-4-2011.jpg

a more recent looking south image Dec-12-2012
IMAGE: https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-YwRHTdEsWQc/UMqJVsG2NiI/AAAAAAAAPME/7v4nSwBu8Bg/s912/stackedImage12-13-12b.jpg

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DanAnCan
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May 09, 2013 21:59 |  #105

I forgot my compass, kind of missed the axis.. What a waste of a night lol

Oh well, thought I'd share anyways

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Official post your Star Trail pictures
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