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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 08 May 2013 (Wednesday) 09:07
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Cleaning camera sensor by yourself?

 
Canon_Shoe
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May 08, 2013 09:07 |  #1

Does anyone know of a good kit you can buy to do this yourself? It looks too simple to continue to pay someone for it :)


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rrblint
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May 08, 2013 09:32 |  #2

Try This link to Copper Hill products (external link). There are others but this one comes highly recommended by most people.


Mark

  
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May 08, 2013 12:33 |  #3

I got the lenspen sensor kit, and it's easy to use. No scratches.


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Gadget-Guy
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May 08, 2013 13:36 as a reply to  @ waterrockets's post |  #4

Have used these for ages now and have no complaints http://sensorswab.com/​index.htm (external link)


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John ­ from ­ PA
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May 08, 2013 14:17 |  #5

https://photography-on-the.net …/showthread.php​?t=1297455

Check this thread for good general info and specific info on Copperhill.




  
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zerovision
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May 08, 2013 14:34 |  #6

Gadget-Guy wrote in post #15911385 (external link)
Have used these for ages now and have no complaints http://sensorswab.com/​index.htm (external link)

+1, these work great and are very easy to do.


  
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Mike ­ K
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May 08, 2013 14:41 |  #7

Canon_Shoe wrote in post #15910432 (external link)
Does anyone know of a good kit you can buy to do this yourself?

To test your cleaning success, shoot at your ceiling (or a blue sky) at f22, low ISO, while moving your camera so that details of the ceiling will not be visible. Simply review the shot on your LCD at max magnification to see the dust. No need to down load to view.

The brush method is less invasive than the "wet" methods, like Copperhill, so I always try that first. This is pretty sensible advice, and you don't have to buy an expensive brush, but clean an art brush out thoroughly before use:
http://www.prime-junta.net …/a_Brush_Your_S​ensor.html (external link)

Then charge the brush with compressed air and carefully sweep the sensor, not touching the sides of the chamber. You can also buy brushes for this application from many sources.

The Copperhill wet style cleaning with a few drops of Eclipse (anhydrous methanol) is the next level of cleaning, but often takes several tries to prevent just pushing the dust about on the sensor.

http://cleaningdigital​cameras.com/methods.ht​ml (external link)
many products and approaches listed.

I change lenses frequently, so take sensor cleaning supplies with me on longer photo trips.
Mike k


Canon 6D, 1DmkII, IR modified 5DII with lots of Canon L, TSE and Zeiss ZE lenses

  
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uOpt
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May 08, 2013 14:50 |  #8

It's not difficult.

All you need to know is that you can't use these swabs twice. You can't. One time use and that's it. Next. It is difficult to grasp for people used to normal cleaning methods but you just can't get the dirt back out of the swab and that's it.


My imagine composition sucks. I need a heavier lens.

  
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agl99
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May 08, 2013 15:00 as a reply to  @ zerovision's post |  #9

Here's my solution after a lot of research on the matter.

1. Get a Lupe, 6x to 10x with lights so you can actually see the dust.
2. Buy the right size sensor swab for your camera, Visible Dust kit, for example. with some cleaning fluid. Use this as a learning and fallback plan.
3. Buy scientific lens cleaning tissue made by Kimwipes.
4. Buy 99.9% pure alcohol.

Don't throw away the swabs after using them, instead cut a small piece of kimwipe and wrap it over the old swab and secure with a small elastic band. When you use it, wet it with a drop of pure alcohol. You just wipe over the sensor once and throw the tiny kimwipe away. It takes practice, you don't want drops of alcohol to dry on the sensor leaving drop marks and yet you want enough to allow the swab to glide over the surface. You may have to go over the edges to get rid of any remaining dust.

The technique you want to use, is to lift any dirt by rolling the swab backwards as you wipe. You don't want to rub dirt in to the sensor filter and scratch it.

I found it pretty hard to get a full frame sensor clean. But, start by blowing out the mirror box with the shutter closed. This helps new dust from making its way to the area you are attempting to clean. Blowing on the sensor seemed to either move the dust around or make it worse. Some people have a added soap, windex or other chemicals to the alcohol to make the alcohol sheet better instead of forming drops...I haven't tried that, it might leave streaks. In the end, I always end up with a few visible dust spots...they say that's normal. If you have so many that your pictures need a lot of retouching then its time to clean it. Otherwise, they say its better to just leave it alone. Hope that helps.




  
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mcoomer
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May 08, 2013 18:23 |  #10

I use Sensor Swabs and Eclipse cleaner. Not much too it. One drop, and only one, on each side of the Sensor Swab, draw it across the sensor in one movement, flip it over, draw it across the sensor in one movement, and you're done. Do not reuse the swabs.


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Canon_Shoe
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May 08, 2013 20:39 |  #11

Got some swabs at a local camera shop today and got it cleaned.....so easy, I wonder why people pay shops so much to do that? About like checking the air in your tires :)


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rrblint
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May 08, 2013 22:48 |  #12

Canon_Shoe wrote in post #15912768 (external link)
Got some swabs at a local camera shop today and got it cleaned.....so easy, I wonder why people pay shops so much to do that? About like checking the air in your tires :)

Washing the windshield might be a better analogy.:lol:


Mark

  
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Cleaning camera sensor by yourself?
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