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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Transportation 
Thread started 07 Feb 2006 (Tuesday) 10:18
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Post Your Best Train Shot......

 
Richard1959
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May 20, 2013 12:14 |  #1861

reole wrote in post #15948941 (external link)
hate the term "drive" for trains since really all they do is Run the train, the "driving" is determined by the conductor (for manual switches) and dispatcher (for power switches).

Well it a lot of places around the world Engineer fix and maintain trains and infrastructure, Drivers drive trains, Guards is in charge of the safety of the passangers or goods, Signallers control trains and set the route by operating points and signals

oh

and conductors are the things electric trains collect their current from

Yours a British railway electrical Engineer (and I don't drive trains)

:lol: :D


Sometimes I take good photos other times !!!!
EOS 5DMkiv EF100-400L f4.5-5.6, EF24-105L f4, EF16-35L f4 EF50 1:1.8 II, EF28 1:2.8 & 580EXII and some triggers. Lightroom & Photoshop CC

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reole
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May 20, 2013 13:48 |  #1862

anyone can be a smartass.


its not how you take the picture, its the final result before editing.

  
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Monty's ­ Double
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May 20, 2013 15:25 |  #1863

Some train shots:

IMAGE: http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7186/6972685947_c75385ef1f_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …uttleworthpix/6​972685947/  (external link)
North Norfolk Railway Spring Steam Gala 2012 #09 [Explored] (external link) by shuttleworthpix (external link), on Flickr

IMAGE: http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7047/6972687809_3a7d451289_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …uttleworthpix/6​972687809/  (external link)
North Norfolk Railway Spring Steam Gala 2012 #07 (external link) by shuttleworthpix (external link), on Flickr

IMAGE: http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7138/6888059806_01bb2c0c16_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …uttleworthpix/6​888059806/  (external link)
North Norfolk Railway Spring Steam Gala 2012_9058 (external link) by shuttleworthpix (external link), on Flickr

IMAGE: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8298/7987161729_bbe24ec0a5_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …uttleworthpix/7​987161729/  (external link)
NNR Autumn Steam Gala 2012_8070 (external link) by shuttleworthpix (external link), on Flickr

IMAGE: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8391/8568845218_4a84649e21_b.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …uttleworthpix/8​568845218/  (external link)
North Norfolk Railway Spring Steam Gala 2013_7999a (external link) by shuttleworthpix (external link), on Flickr



  
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jollyroger99
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May 20, 2013 18:07 |  #1864

Now that's steam, nice pictures Rob.....




  
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Monty's ­ Double
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May 20, 2013 18:26 |  #1865

jollyroger99 wrote in post #15950948 (external link)
Now that's steam, nice pictures Rob.....

Thanks, it was great fun taking these photos at North Norfolk Railway.




  
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Hillbille
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May 20, 2013 19:54 |  #1866

Richard1959 wrote in post #15949874 (external link)
Well it a lot of places around the world Engineer fix and maintain trains and infrastructure, Drivers drive trains, Guards is in charge of the safety of the passangers or goods, Signallers control trains and set the route by operating points and signals

oh

and conductors are the things electric trains collect their current from

Yours a British railway electrical Engineer (and I don't drive trains)

:lol: :D

That's how it is there huh.

Here in the States if you want to start a fight or one whale of an argument all you need do is insult a man's job. Especially a job he has performed most of his life. I't almost akin to insulting one's relatives.

In the States starting back a long time ago, the Locomotive Engineer was responsible for the power, from the front headlight all the way back to the knuckle (Coupler) attaching the engine(s) to the train.

The Conductor was solely responsible for the train. Front coupler to the very rear coupler and everything in between. In olden days the Conductor had in his charge several brakemen and flagmen which acted on his (the Conductor) orders to set or release brakes on the train for stopping, slowing or holding the train. The conductor was also responsible for picking up and setting out cars along the route as well as the safety of the crew.

As passengers were added to the trains the Conductor also became responsible for the passengers, collecting fares and watching for their safety.

Two totally separate and very different jobs.

Here Locomotive Engineers are insulted by a person who thinks operating locomotives is anything like driving a motor vehicle. It's not. Those that do not realize the difference never will and those that do do not need an explanation.

Trains are categorized by tonnage today. Tonnage. Say 8500 TONS. One train that has a rolling weight of 17,000,000 pounds. Now 17 million pounds is a great deal of weight especially when you as an operator are trying to make all that weight start moving or worse stop moving from a rolling speed of say 55 mph and be able to PLACE your stopped locomotive lead wheels within a few hundred feet of a point say a mile or two away on a grade of 1% or more. It is hardly at all anything like driving a car and stopping at a stoplight, unless your going to be driving without any brakes other than a very weak emergency brake and rely totally on an automatic transmission for slowing your speed down a steep hill to stop precisely before the stop sign at the bottom.

If your idea was to insult Locomotive Engineers and Conductors as a whole on a site devoted to photographing those same individuals performing their work, then congratulations you've certainly succeeded. If you were merely trying to be funny with a very poor and badly spoken joke there are several thousand of us that don't really appreciate your sense of humor.

Hillbille


Rebel T2i, XS, Rebel T3; EF-S 70 - 300mm non L; EF-S 55 - 250mm; 50mm 1.8; 18 - 55 kit; YN-560; YN-468 - Pure Fun and Raw excitement.

  
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reole
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May 20, 2013 22:39 |  #1867

I've been a conductor almost 2 years now.... never ran through a switch, hurt myself or tore anything up.... i'll be an engineer probably in the next 2, can't wait!


its not how you take the picture, its the final result before editing.

  
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reole
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May 20, 2013 22:44 |  #1868

http://i42.tinypic.com​/4ruiwg.jpg (external link)

my train coming off the huey long bridge.... i got called for it about 5 or 6 hours later.


its not how you take the picture, its the final result before editing.

  
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Inspeqtor
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May 21, 2013 10:20 |  #1869

reole wrote in post #15951759 (external link)
http://i42.tinypic.com​/4ruiwg.jpg (external link)

my train coming off the huey long bridge.... i got called for it about 5 or 6 hours later.

I am not a railroader although my father had 40+ years on the rails, starting with New York Central, retiring from Penn-Central in 1975

My question is this, why were you called about the train coming off the bridge? I can see it did not literally come off the bridge.....


Charles
Canon EOS 90D * Canon EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS * Flickr Account (external link)
Tokina AT-X Pro DX 11-20 f/2.8 * Sigma 17-70 f2.8-4 DC Macro OS * Sigma 150-500 f5-6.3 APO DG OS HSM
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Hillbille
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May 21, 2013 12:44 |  #1870

Inspeqtor wrote in post #15953039 (external link)
I am not a railroader although my father had 40+ years on the rails, starting with New York Central, retiring from Penn-Central in 1975

My question is this, why were you called about the train coming off the bridge? I can see it did not literally come off the bridge.....

What he meant was that the photo shown was a capture of the train that he was ( 5 or 6 hours later) called to be part of the train crew from the NEXT terminal the train traveled to.

Train crews have no set hours to work. There is no such thing as a 9 to 5 job that works 5 days a week with weekends off for a train crewman. Their job is to be "on call" by telephone 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. When "called" they must be ready to report for duty and accept whatever train assignment the railroad gives them. Train crews may be required to stay with a train for up to 12 hours continuous service before being relieved by another crew until the train reaches it's final destination. Generally train crews operate between two points or terminals where crews go on and off duty and other crews take over and continue across the rails with the trains. Generally a crew is "called" and takes a train from one terminal to the other, then is off duty in a motel or resting place for a minimum of 8 hours and is then "called" for a train operating in the opposite direction so that that crew can return back to it's original terminal. Then the cycle starts all over again.

Hillbille


Rebel T2i, XS, Rebel T3; EF-S 70 - 300mm non L; EF-S 55 - 250mm; 50mm 1.8; 18 - 55 kit; YN-560; YN-468 - Pure Fun and Raw excitement.

  
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Hillbille
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May 21, 2013 12:58 |  #1871

[QUOTE=Frosticles;1580​6709]

IMAGE: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8252/8631515325_00c7c8fcb2_c.jpg
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …/28825728@N08/8​631515325/  (external link)
60054 (external link) by kevaruka (external link), on Flickr

Hey Kevin,
Do you ever see any freight trains with containers on the trains? Just wondering as we here in the States get a great number of that type and they are always in photos, but I haven't seen many form over there so just curious.

Cheers,

Hillbille

Rebel T2i, XS, Rebel T3; EF-S 70 - 300mm non L; EF-S 55 - 250mm; 50mm 1.8; 18 - 55 kit; YN-560; YN-468 - Pure Fun and Raw excitement.

  
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Richard1959
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May 21, 2013 13:14 as a reply to  @ Hillbille's post |  #1872

Hillbille wrote in post #15951304 (external link)
That's how it is there huh.

Here in the States if you want to start a fight or one whale of an argument all you need do is insult a man's job. Especially a job he has performed most of his life. I't almost akin to insulting one's relatives.

In the States starting back a long time ago, the Locomotive Engineer was responsible for the power, from the front headlight all the way back to the knuckle (Coupler) attaching the engine(s) to the train.

The Conductor was solely responsible for the train. Front coupler to the very rear coupler and everything in between. In olden days the Conductor had in his charge several brakemen and flagmen which acted on his (the Conductor) orders to set or release brakes on the train for stopping, slowing or holding the train. The conductor was also responsible for picking up and setting out cars along the route as well as the safety of the crew.

As passengers were added to the trains the Conductor also became responsible for the passengers, collecting fares and watching for their safety.

Two totally separate and very different jobs.

Here Locomotive Engineers are insulted by a person who thinks operating locomotives is anything like driving a motor vehicle. It's not. Those that do not realize the difference never will and those that do do not need an explanation.

Trains are categorized by tonnage today. Tonnage. Say 8500 TONS. One train that has a rolling weight of 17,000,000 pounds. Now 17 million pounds is a great deal of weight especially when you as an operator are trying to make all that weight start moving or worse stop moving from a rolling speed of say 55 mph and be able to PLACE your stopped locomotive lead wheels within a few hundred feet of a point say a mile or two away on a grade of 1% or more. It is hardly at all anything like driving a car and stopping at a stoplight, unless your going to be driving without any brakes other than a very weak emergency brake and rely totally on an automatic transmission for slowing your speed down a steep hill to stop precisely before the stop sign at the bottom.

If your idea was to insult Locomotive Engineers and Conductors as a whole on a site devoted to photographing those same individuals performing their work, then congratulations you've certainly succeeded. If you were merely trying to be funny with a very poor and badly spoken joke there are several thousand of us that don't really appreciate your sense of humor.

Hillbille

To quote Oscar Wilde "We have really everything in common with America nowadays except, of course language" and of course Railroads/ways. May be my attempt at humour missed which I apologise for, I have been a railwayman for nearly 40 years. All railways/roads are run and operated by highly skilled and motivated staff and from my experience in meeting railway/road men from many parts of the world are deeply passionate about what they do. In the UK train drivers are highly skilled people who work some of the worst rosters of any shiftworks there are, likewise our Guards are very skilled front of house dealing with a wide range of passengers and knowing what to do in the event of an emergency. Railroad/ways only work because there is teamwork and trust in the skill and knowledge of there fellow railway/road men, mustn't forget railway/road women


Sometimes I take good photos other times !!!!
EOS 5DMkiv EF100-400L f4.5-5.6, EF24-105L f4, EF16-35L f4 EF50 1:1.8 II, EF28 1:2.8 & 580EXII and some triggers. Lightroom & Photoshop CC

My Flickr (external link)

  
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Inspeqtor
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May 21, 2013 13:16 |  #1873

Hillbille wrote in post #15953497 (external link)
What he meant was that the photo shown was a capture of the train that he was ( 5 or 6 hours later) called to be part of the train crew from the NEXT terminal the train traveled to.

Train crews have no set hours to work. There is no such thing as a 9 to 5 job that works 5 days a week with weekends off for a train crewman. Their job is to be "on call" by telephone 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. When "called" they must be ready to report for duty and accept whatever train assignment the railroad gives them. Train crews may be required to stay with a train for up to 12 hours continuous service before being relieved by another crew until the train reaches it's final destination. Generally train crews operate between two points or terminals where crews go on and off duty and other crews take over and continue across the rails with the trains. Generally a crew is "called" and takes a train from one terminal to the other, then is off duty in a motel or resting place for a minimum of 8 hours and is then "called" for a train operating in the opposite direction so that that crew can return back to it's original terminal. Then the cycle starts all over again.

Hillbille

Hillbille,

I should have realized that as my father was also always on call. Now I fully understand what he meant!

Thank you very much


Charles
Canon EOS 90D * Canon EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS * Flickr Account (external link)
Tokina AT-X Pro DX 11-20 f/2.8 * Sigma 17-70 f2.8-4 DC Macro OS * Sigma 150-500 f5-6.3 APO DG OS HSM
Canon 18-55 IS Kit Lens * Canon 70-300 IS USM * Canon 50mm f1.8 * Canon 580EX II

  
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reole
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May 21, 2013 17:36 |  #1874

Inspeqtor wrote in post #15953039 (external link)
I am not a railroader although my father had 40+ years on the rails, starting with New York Central, retiring from Penn-Central in 1975

My question is this, why were you called about the train coming off the bridge? I can see it did not literally come off the bridge.....

because it was my turn to get called...its not on my territory in this picture and we have a 2 hour call time. Any UP train is unpredictable when we will get called for it since they don't have normal call times. Our off duty time (and I think class 1s) is 10 hours minimum but that depends on place in line and whats running.


its not how you take the picture, its the final result before editing.

  
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Hillbille
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May 21, 2013 18:54 |  #1875

Richard1959 wrote in post #15953603 (external link)
To quote Oscar Wilde "We have really everything in common with America nowadays except, of course language" and of course Railroads/ways. May be my attempt at humour missed which I apologise for, I have been a railwayman for nearly 40 years. All railways/roads are run and operated by highly skilled and motivated staff and from my experience in meeting railway/road men from many parts of the world are deeply passionate about what they do. In the UK train drivers are highly skilled people who work some of the worst rosters of any shiftworks there are, likewise our Guards are very skilled front of house dealing with a wide range of passengers and knowing what to do in the event of an emergency. Railroad/ways only work because there is teamwork and trust in the skill and knowledge of there fellow railway/road men, mustn't forget railway/road women

I apologize if I have offended. Different language certainly leads to very differing definitions. Most here in the States as I said get our hackles up when referred to as a "driver" as we were not taught to think of ourselves that way when being taught to operate trains and locomotives. It is a sad point you make and even worse for me that I am a prime example of your example! I don't mind really and if I were there we'd got out to a nice pub and I'd buy you a pint. As they say it's all good.

Hillbille


Rebel T2i, XS, Rebel T3; EF-S 70 - 300mm non L; EF-S 55 - 250mm; 50mm 1.8; 18 - 55 kit; YN-560; YN-468 - Pure Fun and Raw excitement.

  
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