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Thread started 10 Jun 2013 (Monday) 04:49
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What to do with all your photos?!

 
Ryan0751
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Jun 10, 2013 18:24 |  #16

I have had 2 drobos over the years, without any problems with either of them.

Your mileage may vary... but you should always have a backup, regardless of your strategy!

The advantage of going RAID is it's SOOO much easier to manage than multiple smaller volumes. You can have a 20TB data dump with dual-disk failure redundancy if you want... I have a friend who bought 2 5-disk RAID systems, and they mirror each other automatically over the network. Not exactly cheap, but very resilient!


Canon 5D III, Fuji X100s, Sigma 15mm (Fisheye), 16-35 F2.8 L II, 24-70 F2.8 L II, 70-200 F2.8 IS II L, 100 2.8 Macro L, 1.4X TC, 3 x 600 EX-RT, ST-E3, Nodal Ninja Ultimate M2 with EZ Leveler
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spiderm0nkey
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Jun 10, 2013 20:33 |  #17

If you know enough about computers, you can set up your own RAID array for cheap. Build an average computer for use as a server, set it up on your network and back everything up to that. My husband and I have a home server set up with 12TB total which is always turned on and available on the network. No monitor attached to it, and it's just a basic celeron processor with a couple of GB of ram. Don't need much processing power when you are only using it for storage. Final safe-guard would be to put it on a UPS just in case there is ever a power outage.


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Bob_A
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Jun 10, 2013 21:53 |  #18

Here's my approach.

1. I shoot RAW, import into LR and keep zero converted jpegs for 99% of my images from my DSLR's. I do have lots of virtual copies with different editing, but these are just records in a database so take up an insignificant amount of space. Most of my non-RAW image files are from point and shoot cameras (jpegs) or scans of negatives (lots of TIFs and PSDs).

2. I run two 6GB/s 2GB drives in RAID 1 as my data drive.

3. Important data from my data drive is echo'd to a third internal drive (1.5GB ) using SyncToy started by Task Scheduler every 2 days.

4. Any images that I really care about are uploaded to my Smugmug account at full resolution after they are edited.

5. I back-up to an external drive (WD Mybook) every couple of months. I really should do this step more often and store the drive at work. I also just installed a 3GB NAS, so I could also replace this step with a back-up to the NAS.


Using the approach of only keeping RAWs I only have 391GB of images on my data drive. Currently 28,059 images. I also have 12,985 images on my Smugmug account taking up 93.91GB of space.


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Soapstar
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Jun 11, 2013 03:35 as a reply to  @ Bob_A's post |  #19

Thanks for the response everyone!

Yes i kind of overlooked backing up :confused: Like most people say HDD are cheap and are probably worth the money that loosing photos you can never get back! I think i seriously need to go through my photos and delete the crap i will never use or the million photos of the same subject!

Some people are mentioning backing up to DVD's, this is all good but how do you keep track of what photos are on which DVD? I don't necessarily have large sets of the same 'event' so to speak, more random so keeping track of what photos were on which DVD would prove difficult.

spiderm0nkey wrote in post #16018790 (external link)
If you know enough about computers, you can set up your own RAID array for cheap. Build an average computer for use as a server, set it up on your network and back everything up to that. My husband and I have a home server set up with 12TB total which is always turned on and available on the network. No monitor attached to it, and it's just a basic celeron processor with a couple of GB of ram. Don't need much processing power when you are only using it for storage. Final safe-guard would be to put it on a UPS just in case there is ever a power outage.

I quite like this idea. Wouldn't cost too much to implement either.

Can anyone recommend a cheap/reliable external HDD? Probably around the 1TB mark

Thanks


60D | 18-55mm | 55-250mm

  
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Ryan0751
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Jun 11, 2013 05:31 |  #20

I personally wouldn't back up to DVD. Too little data on each disk, and, what a pain in the neck!

One array system that you can build yourself is something called FreeNAS. It's a software setup based on FreeBSD. It works, and has quite a few features, but you will be looking at a "project" (maybe you want one, I don't know!). If you are going this route I'd also suggest you look at products by Synology.

Their are a ton of extern 1TB disks, by "cheap", what do you mean?

Oh, one other thing I have is a "drive dock":
http://www.amazon.com …r=8-7&keywords=drive+dock (external link)

You can just buy cheap 3.5" disks for your backups, pop them into the dock, then store them offsite (in a static bag). Its way cheaper than buying an external drive enclosure for each of your backup disks.


Canon 5D III, Fuji X100s, Sigma 15mm (Fisheye), 16-35 F2.8 L II, 24-70 F2.8 L II, 70-200 F2.8 IS II L, 100 2.8 Macro L, 1.4X TC, 3 x 600 EX-RT, ST-E3, Nodal Ninja Ultimate M2 with EZ Leveler
http://www.flickr.com/​photos/ryanruel (external link)

  
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drvnbysound
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Jun 11, 2013 07:25 |  #21

As mentioned previously, I personally stay away from RAIDs. I use them at work all the time, but for personal work... it's just too much hassle for me. Yes, a 12TB RAID is nice... until it breaks. Yes, the RAID can be setup with hot-spares (e.g. RAID 5 or 6), but it's really more effort and hassle, and when the RAID breaks, I've not only lost the past few shoots but 12TB worth! Even with the hot-spare, how long does it take for that drive to transition into the RAID? Additionally, I don't want to have to search through 12TB of data to find a particular shoot.

Again, I go with the low-tech solution... simple external HDDs. Whether bare drives in a dock, bare drives in an external enclosure, or external with a permanent enclosure. 2TB is plenty of space for me to use on a regular basis. It allows me to split up work over time; a shoot from X time ago is on another HDD, which I probably don't need access to any time soon. If a HDD fails, I can grab it's mirrored drive.

The question isn't if a HDD is going to fail, it's when...


I use manual exposure settings on the copy machine
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Littlejon ­ Dsgn
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Jun 11, 2013 08:40 as a reply to  @ drvnbysound's post |  #22

I use DVD's to back up files that are now 3 years old. My working file structure looks like this:

2013
- 01.01.2013 - New Years Day
- 01.08.2013 - Event X

I have a parent folder for each year then the date with a quick little note about whats in the folder.

When I back up to DVD's (so thats 2011 and earlier now) I just start at the beginning of the year and put as much on each as I can. I label each DVD 2011 (1of 5) 01.01.2011-04.05.2011. Most of the time I will write out a few lines of what events are on the DVD as well.

I dont tend to go back to work that old, so its just there in case I ever need it, at which point I dont mind doing a bit of searching.




  
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drvnbysound
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Jun 11, 2013 15:15 |  #23

Littlejon Dsgn wrote in post #16020150 (external link)
I use DVD's to back up files that are now 3 years old. My working file structure looks like this:

2013
- 01.01.2013 - New Years Day
- 01.08.2013 - Event X

I have a parent folder for each year then the date with a quick little note about whats in the folder.

When I back up to DVD's (so thats 2011 and earlier now) I just start at the beginning of the year and put as much on each as I can. I label each DVD 2011 (1of 5) 01.01.2011-04.05.2011. Most of the time I will write out a few lines of what events are on the DVD as well.

I dont tend to go back to work that old, so its just there in case I ever need it, at which point I dont mind doing a bit of searching.

Something to consider for this approach, is to make a text file on your working computer that keeps track of the shoots per disk and/or month/year... it would keep you from having to load each DVD (or HDD for those doing it that way) to see what is on each disk.


I use manual exposure settings on the copy machine
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Littlejon ­ Dsgn
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Jun 11, 2013 15:51 |  #24

drvnbysound wrote in post #16021385 (external link)
Something to consider for this approach, is to make a text file on your working computer that keeps track of the shoots per disk and/or month/year... it would keep you from having to load each DVD (or HDD for those doing it that way) to see what is on each disk.

I have a screen capture of the file structure before I move things onto CD/DVD's that I rubberband with the disk cases. Its works pretty well, I make sure to at a minimum have the date range thats on the CD written on the CD itself too.

I very seldome have to go back to the disks for an image. I make a family photo book every 6 months and the good family shots end up going out to all the family most of the time. Its more just landscapes that I go back for if I ever end up with a need, and some of that I keep handy on a backup HD if I like the images enough.

For me its all the family stuff that takes up the most space, because I find it hard to delet anything with people in it (just never know when that person will be gone), landscapes I am pretty good at deleting anything thats not up to my standards.




  
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spiderm0nkey
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Jun 11, 2013 18:05 |  #25

drvnbysound wrote in post #16019990 (external link)
As mentioned previously, I personally stay away from RAIDs. I use them at work all the time, but for personal work... it's just too much hassle for me. Yes, a 12TB RAID is nice... until it breaks. Yes, the RAID can be setup with hot-spares (e.g. RAID 5 or 6), but it's really more effort and hassle, and when the RAID breaks, I've not only lost the past few shoots but 12TB worth! Even with the hot-spare, how long does it take for that drive to transition into the RAID? Additionally, I don't want to have to search through 12TB of data to find a particular shoot.

Again, I go with the low-tech solution... simple external HDDs. Whether bare drives in a dock, bare drives in an external enclosure, or external with a permanent enclosure. 2TB is plenty of space for me to use on a regular basis. It allows me to split up work over time; a shoot from X time ago is on another HDD, which I probably don't need access to any time soon. If a HDD fails, I can grab it's mirrored drive.

The question isn't if a HDD is going to fail, it's when...

It's worth mentioning that the 12TB of storage we have is not all RAID. Most are just 2TB drives. We have a few 500GB drives in there that are in RAID but that's it. At the end of the day, nothing is foolproof. HDD's can fail so always have multiple backups of anything you deem to be important.


Canon 5D Mk 2 + Grip | 40 F/2.8 | 17-40 F/4 L | 85 F/1.8 | 50 F/1.4

  
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ejenner
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Jun 11, 2013 18:05 |  #26

drvnbysound wrote in post #16019990 (external link)
As mentioned previously, I personally stay away from RAIDs. I use them at work all the time, but for personal work... it's just too much hassle for me. Yes, a 12TB RAID is nice... until it breaks. Yes, the RAID can be setup with hot-spares (e.g. RAID 5 or 6), but it's really more effort and hassle, and when the RAID breaks, I've not only lost the past few shoots but 12TB worth! Even with the hot-spare, how long does it take for that drive to transition into the RAID? Additionally, I don't want to have to search through 12TB of data to find a particular shoot.

Again, I go with the low-tech solution... simple external HDDs. Whether bare drives in a dock, bare drives in an external enclosure, or external with a permanent enclosure. 2TB is plenty of space for me to use on a regular basis. It allows me to split up work over time; a shoot from X time ago is on another HDD, which I probably don't need access to any time soon. If a HDD fails, I can grab it's mirrored drive.

The question isn't if a HDD is going to fail, it's when...

x2. And I relocate my mirrored drive in case my house burns down.


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dexy101
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Jun 11, 2013 18:43 |  #27

2tb drives can be had for as little as £60 now, I recently upgraded to a couple of 2tb external drives and 3.0 usb ones at that.




  
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drvnbysound
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Jun 11, 2013 22:39 |  #28

spiderm0nkey wrote in post #16021862 (external link)
It's worth mentioning that the 12TB of storage we have is not all RAID. Most are just 2TB drives. We have a few 500GB drives in there that are in RAID but that's it. At the end of the day, nothing is foolproof. HDD's can fail so always have multiple backups of anything you deem to be important.

Absolutely. As mentioned, it's not a question of if a HDD will fail, but when. That said, my main point was that it's much faster for me to re-build a copy of a 2TB HDD (from a backup) than it is a 12TB RAID.


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Jun 12, 2013 03:27 as a reply to  @ drvnbysound's post |  #29

dexy101 wrote in post #16021964 (external link)
2tb drives can be had for as little as £60 now, I recently upgraded to a couple of 2tb external drives and 3.0 usb ones at that.

Nice to see a fellow Aberdonian on here! :) What brand of external HDD did you go for? Seems to be so many different brands and i don't want to get something that will screw up!


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tagnal
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Jun 13, 2013 16:44 |  #30

Backing up is very important. One of my friends, 3 days ago, had his hard drive crash and he just lost all his photos of his baby twin girls for the last 2 years. He is looking into data recovery but the quotes he's getting is between $1500 - $3000. Not really an option for him at this time.

RAID is really not that complicated. It can be in certain situations but for the use you would likely be using it in, you probably wouldn't even be able to distinguish it from just another external drive other than the initial setup.

What I would recommend is to get something like this:
http://www.amazon.com …ps%2Ck%3Araid%2​0enclosure (external link)

For you, probably a 2 disk enclosure would work well. I am currently using the Vantec one. There are many to choose from however. What you would do is buy three 3.5" hard drives, 2 to put into the enclosure. The third I'll explain later. You can buy any brand that you are comfortable with and any size. Just make sure that the three you buy are identical (don't have to be, but it would just make things easier for you). I personally like Seagate drives. I've had many WD, Samsung, IBM drives fail on me over the years. I've never had a Seagate fail on me yet... (fingers crossed, knocks on wood). However, other people I know have had terrible luck with Seagate yet had great experiences with WD or Samsung. So, whichever your lucky brand is, get those.

After inserting 2 drives into the RAID enclosure, set it up to run as RAID 1 (mirroring). After the RAID has built, you should be able to use it as a drive and it will look and behave as an external drive. If one drive fails, you still have an exact copy on the other drive.

Now, for the third drive, you can keep it bare and stored in a static free bag to use with a hard drive dock (http://www.amazon.com …&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck​%3Ahd+dock (external link)) or you can put it in its own hard drive enclosure. What you do with this drive is to copy all your files from your RAID drive onto this one and then take this drive and store it off-site. Keep it at work, a friend/family members house, safe deposit box, or wherever. Bring it back regularly to keep it updated. The reasons for off-site backup have been explained above I believe.

Another option instead of the 3rd drive, would be to use cloud backup. But, that depends on how you feel about storing your stuff in the cloud, your network speed, etc. Something like this might work in this case: http://www.backblaze.c​om/ (external link)


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